Decidedly off topic

Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 03:14 #531

My President's Choice mini Chef's knife has finally been tamed.
I bought the knife because it was made in Portugal.
I had no knives from there 'til then.

For the longest time I thought it was a dud.
It had a bit of an edge but would not take a better one.
No matter what I tried it barely sharpened and never more sharp than when purchased.

Today I looked at the recalcitrant n'er-do-good and said it's the belt for you.😮
The belt being a small belt sander. I much prefer sharpening by hand and
only shaping with the sander. Today I reshaped the blade of that knife.
Mostly I just sharpened it at an extremely acute angle,maybe sixteen degrees.
Time was taken to barely tickle the steel as the belt was fairly coarse.
Tomorrow I will check out the back of the belt for the grit size.

Now the knife cuts very well,even cheese.
I am hoping the issue with it was the hardness of the steel.
As long as it keeps it's edge I won't send it to the thrift shop.

It's maybe seven and a half inches with maybe three and a half being blade.
I can feel with my fingers that there is more work to do but this is the first
time it has felt like real work has been done.

Below are a couple of stock pic's that look like my knife. Portugal has been
vindicated in my eyes as far as being worthy of being called an acceptable knife maker.

Sorry folks Tapatalk won't accept my first pic'.🤗
I will upload a better one tomorrow.
DSC07172.jpg
20177974.jpg
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 09:56 #532

Tracker didn't get his late night walk due to the fact
I haven't been sleeping well so we got up at four thirty to ease his mind.

My next adventure in sharpening after the mini Chef's knife,
if I can find them, is to sharpen my Henckel kitchen shears.
They are a pretty pair and well made but not sharp at all.
If their main duty is to cut up a chicken then that chicken
better hope it is deceased or it is in for a long,painful death.😮

I will look up on line how to do it and
maybe find a pic' or two of the offending shears.
Feel free to divulge any tips on the sharpening process.

Edited to add

These two pic's are as close as I can come.
Too bad neither show them open so you can see the spring better.
It's amazing what can be done with a bit of rolled metal.
117.jpg
s-l300.jpg
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 15:51 #533

Lots of aquatic veg in the lake so a few handfuls added some vertical structure to the tank.
Often took a couple of minutes to find the pike.  They are such precise little editions of bigger pike!

Imagine a very smallish minnow, perhaps just 25mm. 
They swim with a sort of darting motion then they stop, then they do it again.
Then they are gone and the pike has taken their place.

Koi have never held any interest for me.  Same with aquariums in general.
However, I'm captivated by the artist's skill in paintings of Koi.
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Robson Valley
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Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 15:54 #534

The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 18:35 #535

Robson Valley wrote: The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
Robson Valley wrote: The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
I will check that out oh wise one.😉

Right now I am getting over fixing a flat on my bicycle.😐
For the third time in three weeks.😑
Two of them in the last week.😶

Never found a trace of anything that would cause a flat.
The first flat I did find a small hole in the tire that did not appear to go all the way through.
Even then I plumbed the depth with a beading needle to see if
I could feel something grate. Nada,nothing,absolutely zilch on any foreign material.

The tire got rubbed hard all the way around inside and out.
The rim likewise was checked for burrs.

I even theorised that maybe the object of my frustration was inside the tube.
It's pretty hard to believe that could happen.

Anyway it is pumped up as hard as my little hand pump can make it.
I will limp down to the bike shop top up the tire and kibutz with them.
One more flat and I am shooting the bike and buying a horse.😉

Preferably one that rides better than the one below.😮
giphy.gif
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Robson Valley
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Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 19:03 #536

One of the merits of being taught freehand sharpening was the application to all sorts of other edges around the house.

Do bicycle tires come in different degrees of durability?
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 20:45 #537

They have bicycle tires now that supposedly do not get flats.
I think there is a layer of kevlar in them. Other ideas include tubeless tires,
that have a liquid sealant placed inside on inflation.
There is also something called Slime that is an aftermarket product.

I imagine mountain bike tires are pretty durable.
All that tread means it is less likely for something to pierce.

My tires are hybrids which have much less tread than a mountain bike but more than a road bike.
Really there is very little tread. Bikes as in cars often come with very basic tires.

Oh yes I forgot,there are also thicker tubes which are harder to pierce.
All those upgrades are fairly expensive.

The tire I am looking at for the rear which is almost finished is as expensive as a car tire.
Maybe the rubber is thicker. It is certainly a better looking tire.

I have to formulate a plan to beef up the whole bike.
This constant reparation business is ludicrous.
For the price of the new rear rim I may have been able to buy a better bike.

The upside of that is the reason I need more bike in the first place.
It is so much fun to ride I am doing a lot more of it than planned.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 23:45 #538

Both McBride and Valemount have mountain bike clubs. 
They are enthusiastic enough to have quite new and very widespread trail riding networks.
Paid construction crews as well.   Many more km in the works for next summer.

Watching some of the GoPro video makes my crotch ache.  No.  Not for me.

McBride is maybe 600 people and we have a bicycle sales and service business!  
One man show, used/rebuilt bikes for sale, etc.  Sure was busy this summer.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

14 Nov 2017, 10:20 #539

Robson Valley wrote: Both McBride and Valemount have mountain bike clubs. 
They are enthusiastic enough to have quite new and very widespread trail riding networks.
Paid construction crews as well.   Many more km in the works for next summer.

Watching some of the GoPro video makes my crotch ache.  No.  Not for me.

McBride is maybe 600 people and we have a bicycle sales and service business!  
One man show, used/rebuilt bikes for sale, etc.  Sure was busy this summer.
It is good to hear there are established trails.
There are more than a few riders out there who promote riding in bike parks.
Even though a Mountain bike is much less destructive than an off-road motocycle,
a bike chews up quite a trail. I realise it is impossible to only ride on established trails.
If we limit most of the damage to parks then it is not really damage as the trails are maintained.

It is so good to hear of used bikes being repaired instead of rusting away.
Even if it is just the parts that are re-used it is a valuable resource.

As for your sore crotch?😮
Anyone who invents a seat that truly eliminates crotch crushing will be rich.😀
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

14 Nov 2017, 16:21 #540

The used bike guy set up his own little business.  Reputation for tinkering.
Locals started bringing in family bicycles for "tune-ups."  Then he refurbished some for sale.
By the looks of things, he parted out a lot of bikes for the bent rim folks.

I have no idea what sort of land use permits the mountain bike crowd needed to have to build their trail system.
They had a good brochure with a map and pictures.  Was told it did attract some tourism = all good.
Valemount is about 90 minutes east of me.  I'm sure that they did a lot of talking with each other to get people to
ride both trail systems.

I had a middling Kuwahara MB back in the early days. 
Decided to ride it on frozen logging roads, looking for grouse.
Only did that once.  It was a street bike.
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Quest for fire
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Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

14 Nov 2017, 18:06 #541

Cipaille pronounced sea pie is a French Canadian dish though the name drives from an English dish called Sea Pie.
The French dish is also called six pates which stands for six doughs.
The original dish had mostly wild game in it.
Anything from Grouse to rabbit to moose.
I have had it a few times and it is great.
Think of it like a deep dish pie as that is as
close as I can come to describing it's goodness.

It is much better prepared in an oven or dutch oven but except for the top crust I bet you
I could slow cook it. Below is a recipé for the modern version. Just substitute the meats
you think would go good in it and maybe adjust the spices used accordingly.

It is hard to say what is the best about this homestyle goodness.
The richness of the crust or the wonderfully different tastes and textures of the various meats.

Below are comments on a recipé that looks like a good one.
I can't get the recipé itself to copy. Anyone interested can look up cepaille recipés.
The pictures have to be clicked on so I will post a few pic's of what it can look like.
Imagehttp://fiestafarms.ca/custom/uploads/20 ... d-mere.jpg[/img]
 
If it is your turn to host the gang for the Super Bowl party, or any similar gathering, preparing dinner for a large crowd can be a daunting task; you have to come up with a menu that you’re pretty sure everyone will like, something that is delicious and familiar but not old hat or boring. Sometimes it’s exciting to serve something new, something that your guests have never had before. And when it comes to hosting, spending time with your guests is the main idea, you don’t want to spend all your time in the kitchen fussing over cheese soufflé or worrying about whose steak is medium rare and whose is medium well. Maybe next time you have a crowd over for supper, why not put a distinctively Canadian spin on it and serve them Cipaille?
 
Cipaille is a traditional French Canadian dish hailing from the Gaspesie and is also known  in different areas of Quebec as cipâtes or six-pâtes (literally, “six doughs”). The name Cipaille is pronounced “Sea Pie,” derivative of the old English dish, Sea Pie, a layered meat or fish pie served to British sailors in the 1700s.
Essentially it is a large, one-pot dinner made in a Dutch oven that has up to six layers of meats of different animals, separated by layers of pastry. Think of six meat pies, all cooked in one pot, one on top of the other and you get the idea.
Originally cipaille was made with wild game; hare, elk, venison, moose, duck and partridge were all readily available and they would all go into the cipaille along with onions, celery, carrots and potatoes, and aromatic spices like cinnamon, savory, thyme and juniper berries, each layer separated by a layer of pastry. The entire dish is topped with a final layer of pastry, and hole in the middle allows the cook to pour in the stock or water that the cipaille will cook in.
 
Imagehttp://fiestafarms.ca/custom/uploads/20 ... 0x620.jpeg[/img]
 
Today it is more common to use more readily accessible meats like pork, beef, veal, chicken and rabbit, but if you are lucky enough to get ahold of some wild meats you will have a cipaille that is truer to its heritage. Furthermore, you don’t have to actually make six layers, 2 or 3 is more typical these days. The great thing about this dish is its variety, you can make up any combination of meats that strikes your fancy, although if you are making it for the first time, maybe start out simple.
One thing is for certain, though, this dish will be a hit at your next gathering. Thanks to a few hours of slow cooking, your house will be filled with the most tantalizing of aromas when your guests arrive, and all the work will be done, so you can hang out with your guests and not be hidden in the kitchen. Cipaille is rustic, hearty and delicious, and will feed the most ravenous of crowds. Served with an obligatory salad and ice-cold beer, it just might be the perfect dinner for the big game.
As you might expect, considering the variables in terms of meats and number of layers, finding a definitive recipe is probably impossible. We like this version as it calls for the traditional game meats like elk, partridge and moose. If these are hard to get in your neck of the woods, check out this more modern recipe which calls for pork and turkey.
cipaille1.jpg
cipaille-sans-gluten.jpg
Cipaille 2.JPG
Last edited by Quest for fire on 15 Nov 2017, 14:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

14 Nov 2017, 21:16 #542

Tracker's meat treat today was a sardine in tomato sauce and a fresh slice of crusty bread.
Tracker declined to comment on the snack as he was too busy chomping on a couple of dog biscuits.

He is shedding like crazy and has dandruff to boot. That is why he got the oily sardine.
It is much better to give sardines before the shedding starts but his master forgot.🤗 

If I remember he will get another sardine tomorrow.

Quest for Fire

P.S. 

No where in ths post was it mentioned that I made two toasted and
buttered crusty loaf and sardine sandwiches with red velvet cake for afters.
I wonder who got to eat those? 😊

P.P.S.

Mine didn't look quite as good as this but here is a Red Velvet cake.
Red-Velvet-Layer-cake-resized.jpg
Last edited by Quest for fire on 15 Nov 2017, 14:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Robson Valley
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Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

14 Nov 2017, 22:15 #543

No need for any bready thing to go with that!
I like braised meat for all you can toss in with it.
3 hrs and we eat.

Local pork & chicken, might find some elk, used up all the bear.
Lots of bison and lamb as well.  Might find some venison, easy to get more.

I'd need to stuff a lot of local root veg in there.
One large glass of red would go well.

I'll pass on the cake.  Grand idea but I can't do the icing.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

15 Nov 2017, 14:36 #544

Your excellent ideas on the Cipaille denotes a cook that has done a lot of good cooking.

How can richness of taste be communicated?
The crust even when a heavy one has this undefineable taste that says fine eating.
The only taste that compares but still lacks is the crust of a modern Yorkshire pudding.
Not to be confused with the original version that I have never even seen and only tasted in my dreams.

I myself should stay away from the cake because of the icing.
Perhaps for a different reason than you.

Right now all this talk of food has me yearning for breakfast.
The fine crust on this breaking of fast will be the crust on
toasted crusty loaf slices slathered with rich peanut butter.
Yum,yum.😊

P.S.

Apparently cepaille is spelled cipaille.
I have corrected the error in the original post.

There are a couple of recipés to make this treat in a slow cooker.
When I find one that seems to assure a good crust it will be given a go.

This will be the first time I try making dough for a crust.
The closest I have come were homemade tortillas which were excellent B.T.W.😀
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

15 Nov 2017, 16:27 #545

I have a chance at a moose in a year or two.
This may not come to pass as it is often a case of asking again and again before getting a positive response.
Even when getting permission to hunt it is no sure thing. The land owner can change his mind,
other hunters in the area may object and so on ad nauseum. But there is a chance.

A buddy of mine has fine hunting land well to the east of Montreal.
If you travel an hour and a half in almost every direction from the city you get good hunting land.
My buddy's land is over two hours away. There are many whitetail deer and moose.
He has hesitated to take a moose because of the daunting logistics involved.
Moose weigh a lot and prefer swampy or lake filled land.

You almost have to have a four wheeler or be prepared to carry a two hundred pound plus hind quarter twice,
along with all the other work. It takes two hunter's tags per moose. That gives a chance for more hunters to
get some meat. My buddy is a younger and stronger but not so experienced traditional archer and a fine shot.
I am an older,not so strong archer with a fair amount of experience and still a fine shot. We complement each other.   

Will the hunting opportunity come to fruition? That is impossible to predict.
I know you have to keep on trying if you want things to work out.
That is my specialty. 😊
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

15 Nov 2017, 17:50 #546

Don't stop.  Keep working towards the hunt.  There's no guarantee of success but that's no reason not to be optimistic.
White-haired old friends of mine always go out, fully prepared.  Yes, each rides a big quad.

They got their moose a couple of years back, mature bull and a big one.
Younger hunters stopped to watch the old guys deal with a dead moose.
Gutted, onto clean tarp to be skinned.
Next, out comes the big battery-powered DeWalt reciprocating saw.
Cut the entire moose into manageable pieces.  Into the muslin game bags.
Load the quads and go.

How can richness of taste be communicated?  Not in theory.
Grouse is more like farm chicken thigh.
Bison has a darker, bigger "meat-taste" than cow.  Elk is delicate by contrast.
Moose and venison are in between.  Moose gravy cannot be matched on earth.

I don't have enough pastry made for cipaille.  Need a new batch.
I'd rather make pot pies with chopped game and veg, really.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

15 Nov 2017, 20:39 #547

Pot pies are certainly a worthy endeavor.
In fact except for size they are very much like a Yorkshire pudding.
I had that a couple of times when stationed in Halifax.
Great hot food for a cold dismal day.

Your mentioning how the older gents processed the moose inspired me.
I happen to have a relatively new tarp that is just hanging around.
It's too big by twice but that means I could make two tarps with it.

Yes that hunt is something to look forward to but wouldn't be
a great disappointment if it didn't work out. I don't even need to make the kill.
The fact is my bow is borderline in power for a moose. Most provinces require a minimum of forty pounds.
Mine is forty pounds at my drawlength. I believe one province Newfoundland demands forty five.
That is countered by the fact I have confidence in my abilities and sharpen broadheads better
than they do at the factory. If my partner makes the kill then so much the better.

I have four F.R.S. radios that ensure constant communication is possible.
That means there is no likelihood of us killing two moose by accident.
The more important aspect of radio communication is in case one of us gets hurt.

Here I am talking with alacrity😀about an event two years in the future that may not occur.
Even theoretical hunting is good for the spirit.😊
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

15 Nov 2017, 22:00 #548

I used to buy those pot pies years ago and reheat them in a toaster oven.
Forced me to slow down, put the brakes on the day and the week                                                                                                                                                and wiggle my toes for a while.  No radio, no TV, just sit.
Boiling, I'd crack the crust and push in 2 tbs frozen mixed veg.
The pie cools as the veg cook and supper with a salad is ready.

BC Regs allow a 40lb bow for everything but bison (50).
Crossbows are 120-150.  Too complex for me.
My Rem700BDL in .30-'06 was good for everything.
I have only 2/12 shotguns left.  Grouse with trap loads makes a rewarding day.

Don't worry about the time.  Two years happens quickly.  Go there, have a look around.
Where are the best observation spots without showing your self?
Buy a licence, take some flu-flu and bash some grouse for supper.

Those FRS radios are gold.  One of my old pals banged a good mule deer buck.
Field dressed it, loaded in on the back of his quad and away he went.
Up a rock and the quad went over backwards, unbalanced. 
Straddled two big rocks with my friend trapped underneath in the gap in the middle.
Could reach the radio and was able to call for help.  Roughed him up pretty good.

Snow flurries and +2C windy rain.  So gloomy, I just thought it was supper time!  (2PM)
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

15 Nov 2017, 22:18 #549

The dark is coming quickly here as well.
Four in the P.M. is awful dim shooting time.
I would stay on stand 'til the full half hour after sunset.
It made for a dark walk back to the truck but being in the woods is what it's all about.
I can fling an arrow pretty good in low light conditions but would never do it on a deer unless in an emergency situation.

It is good you mentioned the grouse.
Never hit anything in a tree except a farmed wild turkey.
Some people look down on farmed shoots and say it is not hunting.
They are right,it is certainly not hunting but is the very best practice for hunting.
You see killing an animal is not a done deal even with an arrow in the vitals.
Very often the nerves die slowly and the animals movements disconcert the shooter.
I had one new shooter swear he would never hunt when he saw a hunter slit a turkey's throat.
Better to learn that there than deep in the bush.

I will carve up some etha-foam into 2D bird shapes and stick them in scenery trees.
Excellent practice for aerial shots. I have had the pleasure of doing that in 3D tournaments.
Dem darn boids can be hard to hit. I will have to make up some flu-flus.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

16 Nov 2017, 00:06 #550

Mountain turkeys (Merriams) in south eastern BC like to graze uphill in logging clear cuts. 
They can run down hill for a faster takeoff if needed.  Get above them and you got it made.
Firearms give you no guarantee that the prey is dead.  I hunt turkey with 1 9/16 oz #4 hot 3" x 12 ga loads.
X-full turkey chokes (G. Trulock).  First bird needed 4 neck shots.  Too close and most of it missed him.

Deer are like that too.  Thought that I put a 165gr in the engine room at 100+ yards.  Buck didn't move.
Oh well, go again.  Blat!  Then he runs maybe 20 yards.  2 holes x 2" apart.

Our grouse ( Ruffed, Dusky & Franklin) are forest birds.  They are runners, only roosting in trees at night.
They can submarine through the understory and outrun any human ever born.
Today, Nov.15 is the official end to the grouse season.
However, we have at least 2 species of Ptarmigan up top to hunt until mid February.

Dark?  You want dark?  With mountain ranges both east and west of us, they clip 30-60 minutes of sun off both ends of the day.
On December 21, the solstice, I have observed the sun to set behind the west range at 1:52PM.  

Go.  Take the dog.  Putz around in the woods.  Game trails?  Tracks?
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