Decidedly off topic

Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

12 Nov 2017, 03:10 #521

I knew there were cones that relied upon fire to open them up but had forgotten the term serotinous.
In fact it doesn't even ring a bell. My poor memory has held me back academically and in the workplace.

I hope we do come to terms with Nature as there is no other sustainable way.
I can function in either the technical world or it's natural counterpart.
Really though it is wood that I like. Making chopsticks into arrows or
broken arrows into knitting needles it is all so much fun.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

12 Nov 2017, 04:14 #522

That's OK.  Was my bread and butter, teaching Dendrology in Forest Science for decades.
Bound to mess up the best of us, yes?

We can't come to terms with Nature.  The Laws of Thermodynamics have sent us to our entropic doom.
The extraordinary chaos we create is crucial for our survival.  Extinction is the prize.

Solar powered photosynthesis drives this planet just in case anybody is watching.

Just give me a place to sit, a case of beer and some popcorn.
I'll watch.  Won't take us a million years to put it all in the toilet.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

12 Nov 2017, 08:21 #523

Robson Valley wrote: That's OK.  Was my bread and butter, teaching Dendrology in Forest Science for decades.
Bound to mess up the best of us, yes?

We can't come to terms with Nature.  The Laws of Thermodynamics have sent us to our entropic doom.
The extraordinary chaos we create is crucial for our survival.  Extinction is the prize.

Solar powered photosynthesis drives this planet just in case anybody is watching.

Just give me a place to sit, a case of beer and some popcorn.
I'll watch.  Won't take us a million years to put it all in the toilet.
Doctor David Suzuki had a show on about the health of the planet.
The jist of it was he said he had talked to the people he knew,
the right people and they said there is no hope for the Earth.
Suzuki said this right in front of his daughter who was part of the show.
Now either he was B.S.ing in front of his daughter,which I doubt or
he meant what he said. I did say that it was a show as it was meant
to be entertaining not just a bunch of facts. It may mean that what
he said could be part of the entertainment. That doesn't read right either.

Personally I will soldier on as long as I can.
Maybe it's denial or foolhardiness but I have responsibilities to my child and
all other children out there. I will do what I can as long as I am able.
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Quillsnkiko
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Joined: 22 Jun 2006, 08:25

12 Nov 2017, 08:29 #524

When I lived in Wisconsin Dells I worked in a gift shop there for a while as a part time job. We had these neat Bears...about 2.5 - 3 ft tall that were made from Fire killed pines. Each one came with a certificate that said no living tree was harmed in the making of the piece. If my memory serves me correctly..it was someplace in Colorado. 

Old Wood who sometimes posts in the leather section here lives in Montana not too far from where all those fires burned acres and acres of forests. I think he said they came within 30 miles of his home. He said the reason was partly because the forest service does not periodically burn the under story out of those forests. They were rally glad when they got a early snow..and then some rain afterwards and that stopped the fires.  I bet those area that burned will be great places to look for Moral Mushrooms in the years to come as they say they grow well in burned over land. Quills
" You can't stop the waves .... but, you can learn to surf."
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Robson Valley
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Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

12 Nov 2017, 16:51 #525

Suzuki was a very well-published geneticist.  Many believe he should have stayed with the fruit flies.

However, in the long term, I think he`s right.  You can`t run entropy backwards ( life and the living process= "the system")
without needing, requiring, an extraordinary mess in the "surroundings."  The sum of those 2 must be negative.
I do think that there's more attention being brought top focus on things such as plastic in the oceans.
That bodes well but reveals the energy price of the clean-up.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

12 Nov 2017, 19:07 #526

I saw some video of that plastic sea out in the ocean.
Aside from sea creatures dying from direct exposure,
it is the chemicals that leech into the water.

An example of direct exposure is Sea Turtles thinking plastic bags,
suspended in the water are Jelly fish their natural food.
The poor turtle not only gets no nourishment but
can die from the plastic blocking the alimentary canal.

I saw a tubeless tire on an aluminum rim floating in the mess.
There are preservatives in the rubber that are deadly.

I was an aquarist for many years and so understand what
a closed system such as the Earth can take.

The very best filters I made were ones that mimic Nature.
Aquarists often told me that under the gravel filters were weak,passé.
I learned how to supercharge them for much less than the fancy filters of today.
All you need is increased waterflow through the gravel which is the permanent filter material.
The increased water flow was achieved with inexpensive impellers which have almost no moving parts.

Technology is good,knowing how to have the least impact on Nature is infinitely better.

Below are a few pic's of our sea of shame.
Plastic-sea-1-512.jpg
images.jpeg
319097_10150302240051261_586211260_8415279_1572907418_n.jpg
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

12 Nov 2017, 19:37 #527

I have scuba-diving family in Grand Bahama.  There's a Green Sea Turtle that hangs on a particular reef, it has a plastic 6-pack beer ring
on a back leg.  They actually practice on dry land what they will do to cut it off if they ever catch the turtle.

Increased water flow through gravel is what sustains salmon embryology. 
ANY sediment load and they all die as the water stagnates to become anoxic (BOD?)
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

12 Nov 2017, 22:34 #528

That is the first time I read the term anoxic.

My grqvel needed very little solid refuse removed as I had Koi which as you know
descend fron carp that are known poop disturbers.😊 I would sometimes add a charcoal
filter into the impellers just to negate any possibility of liquid chemical waste.
Even though you can recharge charcoal by drying and heating it I found it
more economical to pry open the tiny plastic filters and replace the charcoal.
Really it is pennies a month.

My biggest Koi was a rescue. It waw destined to be pirahna food.
I know all animals have to eat but that is no way to go.
I had two other Butterfly Koi,one black one gold.
Three fish in an aquarium so big we had to move it in by a double window.
Understocking is one of the best ways to ensure a healthy aquarium.

I could gaze for hours at the languid movement of the fish.
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Robson Valley
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Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

12 Nov 2017, 23:42 #529

Years ago, I had a lakeside summer cottage.
I had a big aquarium.  Each summer, the game was to stock it with a showcase of lake-dwelling life.
I'll say 12 x 16 x 24" long.

We have video of a big conical snail catching and eating a small minnow, tail first.
A Northern Pike the size of a 4" pencil, ambush hunting in the veg.
Crayfish killing minnows by pinching their heads.

Easy to waste(?) a day watching.  People would drop in, just to see the local wildlife in the tank.
The water was pure bacterial poison.  Used ice blocks to try to keep the temp below 70F.
Changing 2/3 of the water every week seemed to help a lot.

Many decades ago, I remember Koi that lived in a pond in a greenhouse.  Under the center bench.
Gloomy, they swam in slow motion.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 03:00 #530

Robson Valley wrote: Years ago, I had a lakeside summer cottage.
I had a big aquarium.  Each summer, the game was to stock it with a showcase of lake-dwelling life.
I'll say 12 x 16 x 24" long.

We have video of a big conical snail catching and eating a small minnow, tail first.
A Northern Pike the size of a 4" pencil, ambush hunting in the veg.
Crayfish killing minnows by pinching their heads.

Many decades ago, I remember Koi that lived in a pond in a greenhouse.  Under the center bench.
Gloomy, they swam in slow motion.
I would have liked to see that tiny pike hunting.

Koi is definitely not for everyone.
I got into it as I met a man who made his living raising them.
He was one of the shooters at a gun range where I worked.
We only had a chance to talk for a few minutes but
anyone who can drive a Rolls Royce by raising
over sized goldfish gets my attention.

He talked to me of computer supervisation of dissolved oxygen and I was intrigued.
Not so much because it was computer oriented but that such care was taken.
He told me that some people could breed Koi so precisely that they could
predict that the offspring would have a dot in a certain place.
Such doings are not for me but I appreciated it.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 03:14 #531

My President's Choice mini Chef's knife has finally been tamed.
I bought the knife because it was made in Portugal.
I had no knives from there 'til then.

For the longest time I thought it was a dud.
It had a bit of an edge but would not take a better one.
No matter what I tried it barely sharpened and never more sharp than when purchased.

Today I looked at the recalcitrant n'er-do-good and said it's the belt for you.😮
The belt being a small belt sander. I much prefer sharpening by hand and
only shaping with the sander. Today I reshaped the blade of that knife.
Mostly I just sharpened it at an extremely acute angle,maybe sixteen degrees.
Time was taken to barely tickle the steel as the belt was fairly coarse.
Tomorrow I will check out the back of the belt for the grit size.

Now the knife cuts very well,even cheese.
I am hoping the issue with it was the hardness of the steel.
As long as it keeps it's edge I won't send it to the thrift shop.

It's maybe seven and a half inches with maybe three and a half being blade.
I can feel with my fingers that there is more work to do but this is the first
time it has felt like real work has been done.

Below are a couple of stock pic's that look like my knife. Portugal has been
vindicated in my eyes as far as being worthy of being called an acceptable knife maker.

Sorry folks Tapatalk won't accept my first pic'.🤗
I will upload a better one tomorrow.
DSC07172.jpg
20177974.jpg
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 09:56 #532

Tracker didn't get his late night walk due to the fact
I haven't been sleeping well so we got up at four thirty to ease his mind.

My next adventure in sharpening after the mini Chef's knife,
if I can find them, is to sharpen my Henckel kitchen shears.
They are a pretty pair and well made but not sharp at all.
If their main duty is to cut up a chicken then that chicken
better hope it is deceased or it is in for a long,painful death.😮

I will look up on line how to do it and
maybe find a pic' or two of the offending shears.
Feel free to divulge any tips on the sharpening process.

Edited to add

These two pic's are as close as I can come.
Too bad neither show them open so you can see the spring better.
It's amazing what can be done with a bit of rolled metal.
117.jpg
s-l300.jpg
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 15:51 #533

Lots of aquatic veg in the lake so a few handfuls added some vertical structure to the tank.
Often took a couple of minutes to find the pike.  They are such precise little editions of bigger pike!

Imagine a very smallish minnow, perhaps just 25mm. 
They swim with a sort of darting motion then they stop, then they do it again.
Then they are gone and the pike has taken their place.

Koi have never held any interest for me.  Same with aquariums in general.
However, I'm captivated by the artist's skill in paintings of Koi.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 15:54 #534

The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 18:35 #535

Robson Valley wrote: The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
Robson Valley wrote: The first thing to do with the kitchen shears is to measure the included bevel angles of the edges.
Even if the true edge-of-the-edge is dull, doesn't matter.
I will make a wild guess to say it's between 30 and 40 degrees each.
I will check that out oh wise one.😉

Right now I am getting over fixing a flat on my bicycle.😐
For the third time in three weeks.😑
Two of them in the last week.😶

Never found a trace of anything that would cause a flat.
The first flat I did find a small hole in the tire that did not appear to go all the way through.
Even then I plumbed the depth with a beading needle to see if
I could feel something grate. Nada,nothing,absolutely zilch on any foreign material.

The tire got rubbed hard all the way around inside and out.
The rim likewise was checked for burrs.

I even theorised that maybe the object of my frustration was inside the tube.
It's pretty hard to believe that could happen.

Anyway it is pumped up as hard as my little hand pump can make it.
I will limp down to the bike shop top up the tire and kibutz with them.
One more flat and I am shooting the bike and buying a horse.😉

Preferably one that rides better than the one below.😮
giphy.gif
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 19:03 #536

One of the merits of being taught freehand sharpening was the application to all sorts of other edges around the house.

Do bicycle tires come in different degrees of durability?
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

13 Nov 2017, 20:45 #537

They have bicycle tires now that supposedly do not get flats.
I think there is a layer of kevlar in them. Other ideas include tubeless tires,
that have a liquid sealant placed inside on inflation.
There is also something called Slime that is an aftermarket product.

I imagine mountain bike tires are pretty durable.
All that tread means it is less likely for something to pierce.

My tires are hybrids which have much less tread than a mountain bike but more than a road bike.
Really there is very little tread. Bikes as in cars often come with very basic tires.

Oh yes I forgot,there are also thicker tubes which are harder to pierce.
All those upgrades are fairly expensive.

The tire I am looking at for the rear which is almost finished is as expensive as a car tire.
Maybe the rubber is thicker. It is certainly a better looking tire.

I have to formulate a plan to beef up the whole bike.
This constant reparation business is ludicrous.
For the price of the new rear rim I may have been able to buy a better bike.

The upside of that is the reason I need more bike in the first place.
It is so much fun to ride I am doing a lot more of it than planned.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

13 Nov 2017, 23:45 #538

Both McBride and Valemount have mountain bike clubs. 
They are enthusiastic enough to have quite new and very widespread trail riding networks.
Paid construction crews as well.   Many more km in the works for next summer.

Watching some of the GoPro video makes my crotch ache.  No.  Not for me.

McBride is maybe 600 people and we have a bicycle sales and service business!  
One man show, used/rebuilt bikes for sale, etc.  Sure was busy this summer.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

14 Nov 2017, 10:20 #539

Robson Valley wrote: Both McBride and Valemount have mountain bike clubs. 
They are enthusiastic enough to have quite new and very widespread trail riding networks.
Paid construction crews as well.   Many more km in the works for next summer.

Watching some of the GoPro video makes my crotch ache.  No.  Not for me.

McBride is maybe 600 people and we have a bicycle sales and service business!  
One man show, used/rebuilt bikes for sale, etc.  Sure was busy this summer.
It is good to hear there are established trails.
There are more than a few riders out there who promote riding in bike parks.
Even though a Mountain bike is much less destructive than an off-road motocycle,
a bike chews up quite a trail. I realise it is impossible to only ride on established trails.
If we limit most of the damage to parks then it is not really damage as the trails are maintained.

It is so good to hear of used bikes being repaired instead of rusting away.
Even if it is just the parts that are re-used it is a valuable resource.

As for your sore crotch?😮
Anyone who invents a seat that truly eliminates crotch crushing will be rich.😀
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

14 Nov 2017, 16:21 #540

The used bike guy set up his own little business.  Reputation for tinkering.
Locals started bringing in family bicycles for "tune-ups."  Then he refurbished some for sale.
By the looks of things, he parted out a lot of bikes for the bent rim folks.

I have no idea what sort of land use permits the mountain bike crowd needed to have to build their trail system.
They had a good brochure with a map and pictures.  Was told it did attract some tourism = all good.
Valemount is about 90 minutes east of me.  I'm sure that they did a lot of talking with each other to get people to
ride both trail systems.

I had a middling Kuwahara MB back in the early days. 
Decided to ride it on frozen logging roads, looking for grouse.
Only did that once.  It was a street bike.
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