Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 5th, 2017, 3:46 pm #481

Well it isn't raining for the moment.
Even with the rain it is a pretty nice day.
Everything had a fresh scent to it,even the rain.
I know that is a funny way to describe the rain but
it's scent was noticeably fresh. The fallen leaves,air and
whatnot all had a delightful odor.

No matter what I have to hit the super-market.
The other day I think I forgot a pound of coffee there.
That is all I can think of as it sure isn't in the house.
Sometimes if it is noticed by staff the forgotten item,
if not perishable is put behind the counter for a while.

The issue is I usually wheel the cart out close to my bicycle.
Any items forgotten would be outside to be picked up by anyone.
I don't begrudge people picking something up and taking it home.
Far better than the store profitting twice from my purchase.
The fact is the second sale would be completely profit.
My preference would be someone else gets free coffee for a while.😊

So I will ask at the counter and blame no-one whatever the result.
Feces happens.😉
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 5th, 2017, 4:33 pm #482

The sly devils at Home Hardware usually slip a recipe or two into each catalog.
Maple syrup/whiskey-marinated & butterflied leg of lamb on the grill was a keeper.

This Thanksgiving, made their barley/raisin/dried cranberry stuffing for the bird.
Easy.  Excellent change from the usual bread-based offering.  I am fond of barley.

OK, here's an example of a 150g "soup kit" from a popular brand (red & white labels):
Add broth, chicken, red bell pepper and tomatoes.  Question: What else do I need?
Might be a lot of peas, beans, etc but well hidden in powdery stuff.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 5th, 2017, 6:06 pm #483

I agree there is nothing better a starter for soup than broth.
Aside from that f you are going to have to put in the basics then all you are realy paying for is flavor.
At the Bulk Barn they have huge barrels of flavor. The one that stands out the most is the almost
neon green/yellow chicken soup powder. As said there is nothing better in a daypack for instant
soup when that is what the situation demands.

Not far from the chicken soup base is a Northern soup blend with no powder evident.
It looks enheartening and would keep well when dry. I picked up half a pound to try it out.
It does call for broth but very little else. The mix looks gnarly. There is no other word for it.

Today it will be pot barley soup with the broth supplied by last night's stew.
One thing I forgot in the recipê yesterday was salt. I don't use much salt.
I like it but a little goes a long way. I would have liked to pick up celery but
it won't get used except in the soup.

Right now there is a real coffee beside me thanks to a clerk at Provigo.
She couldn't find my coffee but then you actually have to look to find something.🤔
She was staring down at closed cupboards like there were no doors on them.🙄
I asked what we could do about it. She made a call and told me to go take another tin.
It isn't as if most young people today don't care. It is that most are not educated.
Education isn't just about remembering facts. It is about problem solving in the real world.
I have my coffee. The pretty clerk😗 got a smile.😀 Tracker got a cookie when I got home.
All is right in the world.😊 
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 5th, 2017, 6:48 pm #484

With everything tossed in and simmered for 30 minutes, it's called "Spicy Chicken Tortilla" soup for 6 people.
Just me.  Positive that the cat won't touch it.

BTW the cat is learning to operate a flush toilet.  At 3AM.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 5th, 2017, 7:33 pm #485

Robson Valley wrote: BTW the cat is learning to operate a flush toilet.  At 3AM.
As long as the cat is not in the toilet at the time I am all for it. 😊

I just checked out the ingredients on that spicy northern soup mix.
Fifteen different beans,peas and lentils. It is spiced with green,red and chili peppers.
That is all there is in there. The mix isn't cheap.
Eight dollars and change a pound. Quality counts I guess.
Sure hope it tastes good.

I just put the barley to soak.
I didn't buy enough in comparison to the lamb/chicken broth but
the rest of it will go into making the northern soup.

Maybe baked beans will be on the menu soon.
I make great baked beans in my smallest slow cooker.
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 5th, 2017, 8:43 pm #486

A whole pound of dry mix is sure to go a long way in a soup.

I make my own pea soup, really like that.  Stew the peas.  Add a big handful of cooked carrot pieces and
hit the whole thing with a 600W stick blender.  Add shredded ham after that.  Measure what I eat and bag up the rest to freeze.

I use store bought baked beans but they really need help from soya sauce, Worchestershire, and garlic powder.

Manufacturing Jewellry Studio here.  I'm the only man on the island so off to shop early for all my girls.  House of Jasper.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 5th, 2017, 10:14 pm #487

House of Jasper,I like that.
Your girls will be thrilled,there is no doubt.

Once I was quite enamored with gem-stones especially of the moon variety.
I was quite the Lunatic for a while. (Still am really🤗)
There is a tiny shop off Saint Denis called Pierre de la Lune. (moon rock)
It was fun to go there. Now you couldn't get me downtown in a Limo' with Shania Twain in my lap........,🤔
............🤔🤔 well maybe if Shania was willing. 😍

I prefer chunky pea soup but wouldn't turn down well made purée.
Especially if there are spring vegetables in there. Habitant used to put out pea soup with spring vegetables.
Lovely stuff, the carrots being a treat.

All is on the boil for supper.
Barely was pre-soaked and warmed up in the microwave.
That way the cold barley doesn't stop the weak boil in the slow cooker.
I also discard the water the barley is boiled in. A starchy smell comes off of it.
Next time I will remember to use it to water my Plantain. 😉

At the same time the barley was tossed in a chopped up carrot,likewise an onion,
half a garlic clove,garlic powder,salt and pepper walked the plank too. I would have put
in the whole garlic clove but it went fugitive on me when I tried crushing it with my palm.😮
I am telling you that garlic is full or life.😁

A nice cup of coffee,half a movie and supper will be had.

Next comes the spicy northern soup.😀
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 6th, 2017, 12:24 am #488

The barley soup was filling but bland. No use in complaining to the chef.🤐
I know the man well and he doesn't stand still for being insulted.😮

There is another bowl left of the soup. It will get more salt and pepper.
There was more than enough meat in there,that is for sure.
Two or three morsels that would put Campbell's Scotch Broth to shame.

Tomorrow it will be italian for a change. The next night is range night.
Maybe the spicy northern soup,maybe not. Next trip to the Bulk Barn,
I will pick up some Navy beans. My slow cooker will be baking soon. 😉
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 6th, 2017, 2:33 am #489

The jeweller works in silver.  All kinds of things like rings, bracelets, necklaces and so on.
All kinds of stones from diamonds on down.
We talk about designs, she works something up and emails the pictures.
When we agree, she starts the work.

In pink silver, my anniversary ring shows the outline of the mountains all around McBride
against a hammered silver background.

She has an Etsy shop.  Some day, you may get to see my ring.

I was there today.  Bought gifts as birthday presents, had a nice visit.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 6th, 2017, 7:40 pm #490

Tracker has been sad for days now.
And not just sad but overly affectionate.
He has always been extremely affectionate but this is over the top.
He is whining and it is irritating me no end. There is little worse than a dog that whines for no apparent reason.
Well I think I finally figured it out. The dog next door is in heat. Now this isn't a nasty dog,no killer there.
She is tiny and well mannered. I had Tracker out to get some fresh air to get him out of the doldrums.
The little dog walks up to Tracker and he immediately tries to mate. I asked the guy if she was in heat.
You know the answer to that. I do not understand some people. Especially ones who know better.
If another male came around the female Tracker and he would fight to the finish to protect her.

The owner could at least mention it.
I don't expect him to hide his dog away like she has the plague.
Maybe I ask for too much. It may be a question of big city living.
People who have forgotten we were all once born in the wild,
in the heat of the moment.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 7th, 2017, 7:23 pm #491

Tracker got short shrift today by anyone's measure.
His meat treat today was a splash of lamb broth on top of his dry food.
Hardly fitting after chicken on top of his food yesterday.
He didn't seem to care and gobbled it down while drooling profusely.

I on the other hand will finally have my dumplings and barley soup.
Really I have eaten like a king with a crusty loaf and baguette accompanying lamb of varying sorts.
All without preservatives I may add. Provigo may be getting wise as their baked in store offerings
are all artificial flavor,color and preservative free. They are tasty too. Much better than the best
commercially baked breads. You should hear and scent the multigrain bread in the toaster.
The grains pop when heated releasing a pleasing odor.

Life is good.
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 7th, 2017, 9:10 pm #492

Making my own bread for the week (2 loaves) is still a pleasure after many years.
In fact, I learned to make pizza crust first.  Mix is 20 minutes, knead then 35 minute rise time.
Knock down, scale as 2 loaves, second 35 minute rise time.
Into my 350F oven for 42 minutes then turn out on a rack.

The key concept is that there's lots of time to do other things  while I wait on the dough.
 Bertinet (book = "Dough") is excellent but he insists on messing around with it over 2 days.
I prefer to use more yeast to begin with.

Have not used poolish.

I can add cinnamon & raisins or all sorts of herbs.
I can make 2 loaves of regular bread ( 20% grain mix)
or 4 loaves of French
or 6 baguettes
or 4 Fougasse
or 2 huge focaccia pan breads.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 7th, 2017, 9:51 pm #493

Robson Valley wrote: Making my own bread for the week (2 loaves) is still a pleasure after many years.
In fact, I learned to make pizza crust first.  Mix is 20 minutes, knead then 35 minute rise time.
Knock down, scale as 2 loaves, second 35 minute rise time.
Into my 350F oven for 42 minutes then turn out on a rack.

The key concept is that there's lots of time to do other things  while I wait on the dough.
 Bertinet (book = "Dough") is excellent but he insists on messing around with it over 2 days.
I prefer to use more yeast to begin with.

Have not used poolish.

I can add cinnamon & raisins or all sorts of herbs.
I can make 2 loaves of regular bread ( 20% grain mix)
or 4 loaves of French
or 6 baguettes
or 4 Fougasse
or 2 huge focaccia pan breads.

You have me thinking about bread for this Wynter.
I would like to try ciabatta buns if that is how it is spelled.
Have you got a recipé for them? They are a bit hard on the teeth when stale but
wonderful for an italian sausage sandwich.

Happiness is a rapidly boiling slow cooker.
Mine is almost roiling which is fantastic for the old pot.
I wear out slow cookers. Dumplings are cooking as we speak.
The recipé called for 1/2 cup of milk but my nutritionist says milk is a no-no.😶
So I compromised using 1/2 1% milk and 1/2 water. 🤗

I threw in a bit of garlic powder and a teaspoon of parsely.

The dumplings started cooking the moment they were in.

I saw a T.V. show about Newfoundland.
They showed a huge pot of maybe two gallons with what looked like small cauliflower boiling on top.
Somebody in the know told me they were probably dumplings in pea soup.
Our neighbors on the Rock know how to live well.

Off to the range tonite well fortified against the chill.
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 8th, 2017, 12:29 am #494

Ciabatta.  No, never made that.  Very slack soft dough = hard to work with.
My bread formula is 100% mine.  I had nobody to ask so I just messed with it
from half a dozen sources until I got something that worked, every time.

I was making really good pizza crust and also pasta so the bread wasn't too big a stretch.
Both the pizza and the pasta are largely my inventions as well.
As you can imagine, I wasted a lot of flour and tossed out a lot of dough, trying to figure out what to do.

"Put it in the fridge", they said.  "That's how you stop it from rising", they said.
The dough rises right through the rack above the bowl and envelops the food jars
like some alien might.

Learn to make a reliable and respectable bread.
Then start messing with options.
90% of the time, I did not comprehend the offered instructions until I'd made bread for a year.
Lots of internet recipes are deliberate upscrews or just bad or just no proof reading.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 8th, 2017, 3:51 am #495

Robson Valley wrote: "Put it in the fridge", they said.  "That's how you stop it from rising", they said.
The dough rises right through the rack above the bowl and envelops the food jars
like some alien might.
My first laugh of the day. 😄

The dumplings were very good if a bit bready.
I may like them slightly undercooked.
It may also have been a pinch too much baking soda.
I am afraid the recipé got winged then stuff was added from there.
All in all the soup was very good. The sauce if that is the right word,
was thick and rich with a pleasing color. Any shepherd would be,
glad for a bowl of it on a chilly night.

I managed to find flour without preservatives in it though it was bleached with chlorine.
It is my hope the chlorine off gasses in the heat of preparation.

Next is bannock or those ciabattas.

Edited to add

As you mentioned sometimes preparation isn't worth the result.
What a rigamarole to make ciabattas. Maybe once in my life for fun...........maybe.

Below are pics and a recipé for ciabattas.

Well darn it the whole recipé didn't paste. What can be seen is too much all by itself.
YIELD: 2 loaves UNITS: US
INGREDIENTSNutrition
  • FOR SPONGE
  • 1⁄8teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2tablespoons water(105-115 F)
  • 1⁄3cup room-temp water
  • 1cup bread flour
  • FOR BREAD
  • 1⁄2teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 2tablespoons warm milk (105-115 F)
  • 2⁄3cup room-temp water
  • 1tablespoon olive oil
  • 2cups bread flour
  • 1 1⁄2teaspoons salt



DIRECTIONS
  1. Make sponge: Stir together, warm water and yeast.
  2. Let stand 5 minutes, until creamy.
  3. Transfer yeast mixture to another bowl and add room-temp water and flour.
  4. Stir for 4 minutes.
  5. Cover bowl with plastic wrap.
  6. Let stand at cool room temp at least 12 hours and up to 1 day.
  7. Make bread: Stir together yeast and milk in small bowl and let stand 5 minutes, until creamy.
  8. In bowl of standing electric mixer, with dough hook, blend together milk mixture, sponge, water, oil and flour at low speed until flour is moistened.
  9. Beat on medium for 3 minutes.
ciabatta-recipe-fp.jpg
Ciabatta-Bread-Recipe.jpg
default_c5ce5903390b7e96210741403f78d5fd_ciabatta bread.jpg
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 8th, 2017, 6:09 am #496

I can do that.  Olives, cheeses, grapes and a glass of white for lunch.
For many people, this may be a very difficult pace to slow down to.
You need some old retired geezer like me to orchestrate the meal.

I'm convinced that the past 5,000 - 8,000 years of bread making with a bowl and a stick cannot be lost.
I have two( ! ) big electric mixers which do a great job.  I use them for most bready things.
No mixer?  No problem.  I can do all bready things just as well.

I have never used the mixers for pizza dough.  Just a big bowl and a stick.
Still amazes my family to watch grandpa make pizza dough with no modern complications.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 8th, 2017, 4:41 pm #497

Robson Valley wrote: I can do that.  Olives, cheeses, grapes and a glass of white for lunch.

I have never used the mixers for pizza dough.  Just a big bowl and a stick.
Still amazes my family to watch grandpa make pizza dough with no modern complications.
Your light lunch sounds terrific.
I am not drinking right now but a dry white seems like the perfect beverage.
The wine cleansing the palate for the next olive.

I check the labels whenever provided and was apalled to read that
no matter what olives I tried there was no vitamin C. Lately I checked and
there is not a signifigant amount to begin with. Less than one milligram usually.
Olive's nutritional benefits lie elsewhere.

I am not a fan of all olives but the sun dried Maroc's are a treat.
A nice blue cheese,olives and a buttered crusty bun are wonderful.
Perhaps even a little pool of balsamic vinegar to dip the bread in.

When you say you use a stick to mix your dough do you speak of
a wooden spatula or an actual stick?

I can imagine a debarked stick would mix well.
The dough wouldn't have a lot of area to adhere to either.
At the end of the mixing you could even give rover a treat in the form of the stick.😊
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 8th, 2017, 5:41 pm #498

Several years ago, I decided that I wanted to carve "something" and see if I could sell some sort of carving.
Coincidentally, I was able to buy beautiful straight grained, custom milled birch planks, about 1.5" x 6" x 5' - 7'.
Cutting the 14" blanks on a table saw, I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks.  Got bored and quit.
About $0.15 wood in each one and sold for $12.00 after about 90 minutes carving work.

Shaped with spokeshaves, the handles are just strong, round sticks.  They are ideal for heavy dough ( pizza, pasta, cookies, etc.)
Paddle spatulas are too hard on my arms so I had turned them around to use just as a stick.
However, most store-bought ones are weak and break.  Mine are 3/4" - 7/8" diameter.

They have an oven-baked olive ol finish which is impossible to wash or boil off.
Quote
Like
Share

Quest for fire
Registered User
Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: March 22nd, 2007, 6:19 am

November 8th, 2017, 6:41 pm #499

Robson Valley wrote: Several years ago, I decided that I wanted to carve "something" and see if I could sell some sort of carving.
Coincidentally, I was able to buy beautiful straight grained, custom milled birch planks, about 1.5" x 6" x 5' - 7'.
Cutting the 14" blanks on a table saw, I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks.  Got bored and quit.
About $0.15 wood in each one and sold for $12.00 after about 90 minutes carving work.

Shaped with spokeshaves, the handles are just strong, round sticks.  They are ideal for heavy dough ( pizza, pasta, cookies, etc.)
Paddle spatulas are too hard on my arms so I had turned them around to use just as a stick.
However, most store-bought ones are weak and break.  Mine are 3/4" - 7/8" diameter.

They have an oven-baked olive ol finish which is impossible to wash or boil off.
I was going to say most wooden spoons and spatulas seem barely adequate for a heavy dough.
I as well like formidable kitchen cutlery. My olive wood spoon is nice,too nice to risk breaking.

I had never heard of a baked olive oil finish. It sounds just the ticket.
Do you just wipe the oil on and off?
Is there more than one coat?
Quote
Like
Share

Brian T
Registered User
Brian T
Registered User
Joined: April 24th, 2015, 12:27 am

November 8th, 2017, 8:59 pm #500

I was carving the spoons and forks a dozen at a time.
Preheat your oven to 325F.  You need cake racks over a big sheet pan.

This finishing technique takes advantage of Charles Law of gas physics.
Namely, that hot gases expand and cooling gases contract.

Slather the woods with the veg oil of your choice.  Slop it on, lay them on the rack over the sheet to catch the drips.
Into the oven for no more than 3 minutes and 30 seconds by the clock.
4 minutes and they begin to cook like french fries.
Take them out, let them cool.

What happened?
In the oven, the outer wood air was heated and expanded.
I expect that you will see bubbles on the oil.
Out of the oven, the remaining wood air contracts and sucks the oil down into the wood.

1.  Unless you reheat the wood to 350F, the oil won't move.
2.  It can't go rancid because the oil _replaced_ the air/oxygen.
3.  You can't wash it off.
4.  It won't come out in boiling water/soup.
5.  Soup juice can't get into the wood to decompose and go black like the bottom of your compost bin.
Quote
Like
Share