Decidedly off topic

Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

01 Nov 2017, 02:56 #461

Here is a working man's knife we have all seen before.
The ubiquitous Opinel. This model is stainless steel.
It belongs to an archery instructor at my range.
He is an unassuming fellow originally from France.
His bow is a Firehawk made by Rodney Wright.
Rodney lives in the Eastern Townships about an hour's drive away.
I will show you a couple of his bows tomorrow.

The instructor's knife has seen some wear.
There are three nicks in the blade edge. It is sharp enough for
light cutting duty. I keep mine much sharper than that but that is me.
As said,his blade is sharp enough. Here it is below.
20171031_192518.jpg
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

01 Nov 2017, 20:20 #462

The Montec broadheads are interesting. I do not know if
all their broadheads are made this way but some at least are cast.
They use something called Monoflow technology. I guess the idea
is that one casting makes for better cohesion between molecules and
that makes for a stronger head. The Montecs certainly seem formidable.
The cut on contact point is backed up by a solid pyramid of metal.
The crux of the matter is how well does that point cut on contact.
How well do the blades behind it cut.

The answer may lie in how and at what angle the head is sharpened.
We are advised that the head is sharpened two sides at a time.
Let me explain,you take the head carefully and let it lay flat on
the stone or whatever you are using to sharpen. The head will
naturally lie on two edges. You push the head along point first.
Thereby sharpening two edges. When satisfied you turn the head
over onto the next two edges and repeat. Obviously that must be
done three times.

Even a new head is not shaving sharp.
Carefully following their sharpening procedure nets a head capable of
hacking off a few hairs. It think it is not the metal nor heat treatment that
causes the relatively poor performance. It is the obtuse angle at which it is
sharpened. If my calculation is correct the blade angle is one hundred twenty degrees.
Even if I am wrong and it is sixty degrees that is an incredibly obtuse angle.

There are upsides to this method and it's result. One being field sharpening is easily accomplished. Two is it makes for a durable point that certainly won't break or fold on
contact with bone. 

I have only hunted from a tent once. There is nothing better after a hunt than to
wind down with a cup of coffee and a bit of sharpening. I feel joyful just thinking
about it. It helps to both focus and relax the mind. A reordering reset of the mind.
It lets you know that in the morning when cold and cranky wake up where you
went to sleep that everything is good to go. Fresh socks on your feet and
a sandpaper beard on your face,unless you are a woman,😉and
your mind starts to percolate like the coffee pot. 😊
No need to worry about your broadheads. 🤔
They are on your arrows good to go. 😀

Below are a couple of pic's of Montecs.

Edited to add

Upon reading this in the morning I decided the wording was misleading.
I had mispoke myself. The Montec cast broadheads are fine broadheads.
They are not perfectly true and so should be put on a trueing stand before utilisation.
If the opportunity arises all 'heads should be trued. Not everybody has a trueing stand.
Not everyone is that painstaking either. I enjoy being as precise as possible as the situation permits.
After that I leave the world of cold logical truth behind and enter into the warm reasonable world of
knowing I have done my best and let the bow and arrow shoot themselves as much as possible.
Of course that last statement is figuratively speaking. We can get into it at another time.

A trueing stand is nothing more than four bearings set up in a jig that allows an arrow to be rolled on it.
When you roll an arrow on the jig any broadhead on the shaft will rotate as well. That means you can
place a stationary point of reference in front of the point of the broadhead and see if it appears to wobble.
One of the best points of reference is a small bottle with printing on it. You line up the printing
with the stationary broadhead. Then you rotate the arrow. The point will then either appear to be
relatively stationary or waver in relation to the point of reference.  

To fix any waver you use a broadhead wrench or a leather gloved hand to tweak the 'head into position.
It does not take very much. What appears as an evident wobble is really off by a 32nd or so.
That process should be done with every 'head.

I personally wouldn't use the Montec's on big game unless in an emergency situation.
They are not particularly sharp even if sharpened by the Archer. That is true of my particular situation.
Using a light traditional bow. Once trued,sharpened and shot out of a medium weight bow at
sport hunting distances then the Montecs are fine tough heads that will split bone with ease.
It's all relatively speaking.

It's time for Tracker to get his first walk.
171495_ts-1.jpg
downloadfile.jpg
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

03 Nov 2017, 02:20 #463

Another aspect I like about the Montec is the fact it comes with a practice head.
Now I acquired these 'heads from a friend of mine. He said they wouldn't fly right.
I suggested truing them but he didn't have the time. He is a hard working individual,
with 150 acres of prime hunting land he has planted with Walnuts and
other trees to his druthers.

So he gave me the 'heads. I put them on my truing jig and
sure as shooting a couple were bald face liars as far as accuracy was concerned.
Easy enough to tweak and I had four small-game heads if you included the
practice one. It is exactly the same shape but is black anodised.
I guess the company saved by not heat treating and sharpening it.

The head was useless for big-game but perfect for small-game.
Is it good for squirrels and rabbits? Only out of necessity.
But marmots and similar sized game are hard to kill.
A marmot has small vitals and holds onto life tenaciously.
I have seen them with two fairly well placed arrows in them and
fairly snapping at me. That is why I don't mind a bit of overkill.
Better that than a suffering animal.

Below is a pic' of the Montec practice 'head.
montec-preseason-fixed-blade-broadhead-unsharpened-practice-broadhead.png
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

03 Nov 2017, 15:07 #464

It was an interesting night at the range.
Maybe ten junior and one senior archers shooting at first.
That pair of lively kids showed up a bit late. It wasn't due to a lack of alacrity. 😀
They were fairly well behaved,no admonitions necessary. At eight P.M. when the
juniors stop shooting there was suddenly no-one excepting the two other instructors.
That gave me a chance to get my bow out and have a coffee. The bow got braced.
The coffee was drunk.

I had no interest in getting the 3D critters out. Getting them out😀means putting them away.😶
My feet just don't like walking. But there were a couple of 2D targets out already. A deer at
twenty yards and a rabbit at twenty five. I let loose an arrow to warm up the muscles.
Archers rarely do that,warm up I mean. Even I don't do my isometrics,just start off slowly.
Another instructor didn't warm up and stopped soon after saying his shoulder was sore.
Too much shooting the other day. The other day he didn't warm up either.
I must remember to do those isometrics.

Nothing worthwhile mentioning about my shooting.
Maybe a dozen arrows then I stopped. From now on I will try to shoot twice a week.
That way my muscles will remember to do their job properly. 😉

Quest for Fire
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

03 Nov 2017, 15:54 #465

The exercises are terribly important.  Daily.

The shotgun that I used for trap shooting weighed a little more than 7lbs.
A practice round means that I lift that shotgun to my shoulder at least 25 times in what?  15 minutes?
A club "shoot" was 300 targets in 2 days.
Get tired in a match and you get sloppy.

The Grand Nationals are 1,500 clays and so many break straight that there's a shoot-off of another 1,500.

I had a drawing of a trap-house and a clay targt scaled down for the hallway in my house.
Over the barrel, it appeared to be 16 yards away.
I could practice the lifting 50-75 time per day.  25 and stop.  25 and stop. . . . .   typical.

I learned that I'd never be much of a shooter but I like to think that the exercise brought my average from 20+ to about 23/25 clays.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

03 Nov 2017, 19:13 #466

  • I had to post this recipe here.
  • It will get removed later
  • 3 pounds lamb shoulder chops
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • water as needed
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby Dutch yellow potatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • Add all ingredients to list
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Directions
Add a notePrint 
  • Prep
    20 m
  • Cook
    2 h 25 m
  • Ready In
    2 h 45 m
  1. Season lamb shoulder chops with salt and black pepper.
  2. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over high heat. Working in batches, cook lamb shoulder chops until browned on both sides, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Transfer chops to a stock pot.
  3. Cook and stir onion with a pinch of salt in the same skillet over medium heat until slightly softened and edges are browning, about 5 minutes. Stir butter into onion until melted; add flour and stir until onions are coated, about 1 minute.
  4. Pour stock into onion mixture; bring to a boil, add rosemary, and stir until mixture thickens, 5 to 10 minutes.
  5. Stir carrots and celery into pot with lamb shoulder chops and pour chicken stock mixture over the top. Add water as needed to cover meat completely. Bring mixture to a simmer, reduce heat to low, cover the pot with a lid, and cook until meat is almost falling off the bone, about 1 1/2 hours.
  6. Transfer meat to a plate. Stir potatoes into stew and return meat to stew, placing on top of vegetables. Simmer, covered, until potatoes are tender and meat is falling off the bone, about 30 minutes.
  7. Transfer meat to a plate using a slotted spoon. Bring stew to a boil and cook, skimming off fat, until stew is reduced and thick, 10 to 12 minutes.
  8. Remove meat from bones; discard bones and any pieces of fat. Stir meat back into stew. Stir green onions into stew and season with salt and pepper to taste.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

03 Nov 2017, 20:31 #467

OK.  Thanks, the lamb is downstairs in the freezer.

For many years I have done this with pecans as a Christmas treat.  Just last week, I was in the city.
Pecan halves were $16.50/lb and walnut halves were $4.50/lb.
So ( methinks), I should try to use walnuts just for the experiment.

You have to measure everything.  You will be stirring nonstop in a big pot and there
is NO CHANCE to measure anything = done in 10 minutes = fast & furious or it is all burnt.

2 tbsp cooking oil in a deep pot (mine is 12" x 12")
2 tsp cumin seeds + 2 tsp mustard seeds ( or more, not all of it sticks.)
2-4 tsp mild curry powder
soya sauce bottle with the top off
1+ tsp plain fine grain salt.
4C nuts (the more grooves, themore spices they hold
plain sheet pan, preheat the oven to 350F

Start the oil heating in the pot, adding a few seeds
When they commence to popping, add the rest of the seeds and start stirring.
When they pop and spit hot oil, dump all the nuts in on top and keep stirring to coat.
Sprinkle in all the curry powder and stir to coat.
Shake in the salt and maybe 2-3 tbsp soya sauce (keep stirring all the time) to act as glue as it dries
to hold the spice & seeds on the nuts.

OK.  Off the heat, spread on the sheet pan, into the oven and watch =
maybe 8 minutes is enough to see a few start to blacken on the edges.

That's it.  Experimental batch #1 of walnuts goes this afternoon.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

04 Nov 2017, 04:07 #468

Eight minutes in the oven was effective.  Curried walnuts are rather good.

Next is a mixed batch of pecans and walnuts, simply oiled, salted and roasted.
I think the walnuts cook as well as the pecans so a mix is reasonable.

Then a batch of original recipe with pecans.

I will eat some bison, first.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

04 Nov 2017, 13:09 #469

Robson Valley wrote: Eight minutes in the oven was effective.  Curried walnuts are rather good.

Next is a mixed batch of pecans and walnuts, simply oiled, salted and roasted.
I think the walnuts cook as well as the pecans so a mix is reasonable.

Then a batch of original recipe with pecans.

I will eat some bison, first.
Delicious recipes there.
I may try some in the future. All except the walnuts.
I like them but they are not good for
someone with a thyroid condition.

The lamb stew recipe got tried out late last night.
It advised letting the stew cool and then reheat it.
One of those it is better the next day deals. A lot
of substituting and doing without went on. I had
no flour for a thickener and so theorised that a slice of bread would work.
It apparently did as the house was filled with the delicious scent of dumplings.😀

No celery in the house either but I did without that.🤗
The lamb looked to be roughly cut up boneless shoulder.
There was just a half pound in all so it got cut up fairly small.
My favorite chef's knife made short work of the lovely meat.
Just enough fat to make for an interestingly tasty, texture treat.

Half the onion and garlic got dumped in the crock raw.
The other half sautéed as the meat braised.
Lovely garlic I may add. None of those dinky,
pallid Chinese shameful offerings.
Local purple giants with cloves so firm
they wouldn't crush between thumb and forefinger.
I had to slice them in two to remove the skin.

I may end up getting flour today and make dumplings.
My stew donuts are not very good but good enough.
A real comfort food and fond reminder of my childhood.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

04 Nov 2017, 16:22 #470

Lots of my recipes are the "better tomorrow" type.  Makes round #2 such a pleasant surprise.
I'm buying local garlic.  Two types: hard stem and soft stem ( after drying.)  The soft stem is the really hot stuff.
Many growers, going rate is $12/lb.  5lbs easily last me a year to the next crop.  The grower I deal with planted 4,000.

I have a soft rubber tube, a bit bigger than a bratwurst. 
Put garlic clove inside and roll on the bench = makes most of the paper come loose.
Dumbs it down, I know, but I do a few heads when I think of it and freeze it all.
Going to get smashed beyond recognition in a recipe, anyhow.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

04 Nov 2017, 17:06 #471

Nah on the dumbing down there.
As long as it isn't silicone rubber I am all for it.
I know silicone is supposed to be safe.
It just feels dead to me something other.
I hate to put it like this but it almost feels soul-less like touching a corpse.
I know it is just me but plain rubber has been in use for hundreds upon hundreds of years.
We know it's properties and the effects of those properties.

Silicone especially when in touch with hot foods,especially liquids,offgasses.

On the plus side of garlic and my overly fastidious nature is
it is supposed to be that there are compounds within garlic that mix when it is partially crushed.
Kind of like when we masticate it. Short of chewing on raw garlic which I hate,
except for miniscule amounts in a salad dressing,I like to believe that little,
hands on crush has a health benefit.

Right now I am wondering if a latex bicycle inner tube would work as a garlic skinner.
Hah,I can see what my bike mechanic will be thinking when I tell him why I want to,
use his discarded inner tube.😮

I know I harp on preservatives a lot but they are devastating and pervasivie.
They are in flour now which can also have chlorine in it. I am presuming
they use chlorine as a cheaper way to whiten or bleach flour instead of,
using hydrogen peroxide which at least has known health benefits.

I think the Bulk Barn has flour without preservatives.
I don't use much and can take what is needed.
That way nothing goes to waste.😉 
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

04 Nov 2017, 17:34 #472

I can buy "unbleached" flour in 10kg bags in the store.  Do not know how honest they are.
I use a fair amount of flour as I make my own bready things, pizza crusts and pasta.
There's some sort of a very pleasant "Zen-thing," working with the dough.

Bicycle inner tube would be just about the right size for garlic.  No idea how it works but it does.

I commonly slice the garlic cloves.  Very distinctive shaped slices. 
That way, anybody who won't eat them can recognize the slices and pick them out.

BTW, if you buy Robin Hood brand "Best For Bread" flour grain mix,
The flax seeds are not supposed to have 6 legs and walk around.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

04 Nov 2017, 18:33 #473

The word for the day is surreptitious. It is a good idea I looked it up,
as the fact it is not spelled surrepetitious was hidden from me.😉


sur·rep·ti·tious·ly
ˌsərəpˈtiSHəslē/
adverb
  1. in a way that attempts to avoid notice or attention; secretively.
    "Mary surreptitiously slipped from the room"
Furthermore the Mot a Completér today was raquettes which is french for snowshoes.
I wasn't sure if I was right as I didn't get all the letters and don't look up the clue unless it is necessary.
I did get r a q u e right away so that kind of narrowed it down.

Let it be known I am not a puzzle wizard.
I enjoy doing what I can. The Mot a Completér also helps my french.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

04 Nov 2017, 18:38 #474

Robson Valley wrote:Bicycle inner tube would be just about the right size for garlic.  No idea how it works but it does.

I commonly slice the garlic cloves.  Very distinctive shaped slices. 
That way, anybody who won't eat them can recognize the slices and pick them out.

BTW, if you buy Robin Hood brand "Best For Bread" flour grain mix,
The flax seeds are not supposed to have 6 legs and walk around.
I imagine the rubber has great purchase on the skin of the garlic.

Your comment on Robin Hood flour was my first smile of the day. 😊
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

04 Nov 2017, 23:25 #475

The flour was annoying.  Not a whole lot left in the bag, anyway.
Hope the next bag is cleaned, I need to make bread.

So I mixed the bad stuff up stiff with some powdered beef stock
and made doggie cookies out of it.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

05 Nov 2017, 00:21 #476

Robson Valley wrote: The flour was annoying.  Not a whole lot left in the bag, anyway.
Hope the next bag is cleaned, I need to make bread.

So I mixed the bad stuff up stiff with some powdered beef stock
and made doggie cookies out of it.
Ah I see,your reference to six legged critters was of the moment.😮
At least bowser will profit from the flour's demise.😉

The lamb stew was good enough but no more.
What I should have done was make a full sized stew with very little meat.
All that is left after two bowls is half a gallon of broth.
What I will do tomorrow is make dumpling soup.
An old timey recipé I just made up.😊

Next time a small amount of lamb stew meat comes on special,
I will add parsnip if the price is not outrageous.
Boy as a child I remember deep fried parsnip chips.😀
Now parsnip is sold in a bag with premium stew veggies.🙄
Sometimes there are even purple carrots in there.😮
A proper Scotsman would get the apoplexies at the sight.🤐
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

05 Nov 2017, 01:00 #477

There's a garden here that sends out a weekly grocery list.  Package deals.
I get red, white, purple, yellow and orange carrots in the same bag.

The true merit is that it forces me to eat well, to use what all I buy.

Parsnips, turnips, yams, and carrots make fries to die for.
They are such a shock to newcomers.
I set my fryer to "stun" and made beet chips last week.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

05 Nov 2017, 02:43 #478

Robson Valley wrote: Parsnips, turnips, yams, and carrots make fries to die for.
They are such a shock to newcomers.
I set my fryer to "stun" and made beet chips last week.
I will have to try all of those french fried delicacies.

My Ex used to make pickled carrots that were very good.
She used French's Kosher Dill spices. My friends in the country quite liked them.

Barring inclimate weather I will make a couple of trips for provisions. At the very least margarine and that flour.
Up here we call dumplings Grandmas and their dry baked counterparts Grandpas.
I will sleep on whether they will be plain flour or with something added in.

If you ever make a watery chili make corn meal dumplings and dump them in.
I had just such a chili and the corn dumplings were the perfect solution.
They absorbed all the excess liquid and were quite tasty.
I tend to make dumpling dough a bit stiff.
They hold together well that way.

Aylmer soups are on special.
The store is not showing the reduced price on their mushroom soup but I know their antics.
Checking the mushroom soup on a scanner revealed their ploy.
Two cans of soup with only one can of water makes for a delightful treat on buttered toast.
Comfort foods make nasty Wynter winds into mild summer zephyrs.
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

05 Nov 2017, 02:55 #479

I will try to get to the grocery store on Monday.   I bought some "dry soup mixes" a while back.
By the time I add all the stuff that they claim is missing, why bother?  5X the price of starting from scratch!

-20C at sunrise today.  Had a ptarmigan roosting in a spruce tree out front yesterday morning.
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Quest for fire
Registered User
Joined: 22 Mar 2007, 06:19

05 Nov 2017, 12:24 #480

Robson Valley wrote: I will try to get to the grocery store on Monday.   I bought some "dry soup mixes" a while back.
By the time I add all the stuff that they claim is missing, why bother?  5X the price of starting from scratch!

-20C at sunrise today.  Had a ptarmigan roosting in a spruce tree out front yesterday morning.
-20 C already? 😮
Man,Nature doesn't fool around in your neck of the woods.
In Québec we are still waiting for the first frost. My buddy on the Reserve used to hit the States quite frequently.
He would get these fifteen bean soup mixes. I got him to pick me up a pound bag once.
Most of what you had to add was what you wanted not needed.
Those soup mixes were great. Nothing at all like what you get at,
the super-market. Even the best are very much like those chicken,
soup mixes which are mostly flavor and chicken fat.
Good in a hunter's daypack in case of an extended stay.
Even better if unwanted visitors show up at the house. 😊
In and of themselves more of a pot-pouri than something edible.😶

It is raining where I live.
Hard enough that I wish I had not worn my wholy,unholy,holey crocks.😮
They will stay wet for half the day.😐 I will still make at least one journey by
bicycle. At the very least to the super-market for margarine and bread.
If I still have the gumption the Bulk Barn will get visited.
I am still up in the air about dumplings. During the night
barley came to mind to make the broth a true Scotch Broth.

As far as the dumplings are concerned I was thinking of adding
a small amount of tomato sauce to the mix. It just came to me that the
Bulk Barn has tomato soup mix. If I go the dumpling route there may well be
more than one kind of dumpling in there.😊

Of course all that depends upon my testicular fortitude.😉
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