Coppicing, pruning for arrow production

ramaytush
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ramaytush
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Joined: 12:42 AM - Nov 11, 2010

7:42 AM - Dec 24, 2017 #1

I am starting coppicing some hazel bushes. Does this help them to grow straight long shoots for arrows? It would be nice to encourage shoots or cultivate them rather than walk around the woods all day looking at 100 bushes to find 3 shoots. Other plants we have are oemleria cerasiformis(osoberry), cornus (dogwood), rubus spectabilis (salmonberry) and ocean spray. I would also like to try to coppice some choke cherry and serviceberry. Hopefully someone has some answers. This is a long term experiment
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ramaytush
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ramaytush
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Joined: 12:42 AM - Nov 11, 2010

7:43 AM - Dec 24, 2017 #2

Also has anyone used eucalyptus shoots from a stump?
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Quest for fire
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Quest for fire
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Joined: 6:19 AM - Mar 22, 2007

3:59 PM - Jan 03, 2018 #3

Raymatush I think everyone here is enjoying the last of the holidays.
Your ideas sound good. I too wonder what eucalyptus would be like.
I never heard of it being used for arrows before but then it doesn't grow here.😉
Last edited by Quest for fire on 2:21 AM - Jan 04, 2018, edited 1 time in total.
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ww
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ww
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9:07 PM - Jan 03, 2018 #4

does grafting and cloning have a place in a long term experiment?
https://courses.cit.cornell.edu/hort494/mg/index.html
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mstu
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mstu
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2:15 AM - Jan 18, 2018 #5

I've been harvesting crepe myrtle shoots for several years; they coppice regularly either when pruned high or at the base where they've been nicked by a string trimmer. In my experience, there's some difference from plant to plant, but I think it's at least as much about the lighting conditions of a specific plant. One plant can make as many  as a dozen good shoots, though more typically it's one to three per plant, and some either grow too curved or too branched and don't have any really good shoots on them.

Michael
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Steve Martin
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Steve Martin
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Joined: 11:16 PM - Feb 09, 2012

3:33 AM - Jan 29, 2018 #6

If you send a question to www.badgers.org.uk you may find some folks who have more experience with compiling.  I believe some monasteries have been compiling for several hundred years and have records as to tree species, time to cut certain size growth, etc. 
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Steve Martin
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Steve Martin
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3:34 AM - Jan 29, 2018 #7

Computer thinks it is smarter than me and changed "coppicing" to compiling.  I didn't catch it.  My apologies!
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Teach
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Teach
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8:31 PM - Jul 24, 2018 #8

Steve Martin, my apologies if I'm wrong. But should your link not read www.bodgers.org.uk ??? With an "o" and not an "a"? Cheers
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Archeryrob
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Archeryrob
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8:16 PM - Jul 25, 2018 #9

I would trim russian Olive and Southern arrowwood shoots that were straight. knock the leaves and small branches off and let them grow another year and harvest them. The best grow from inside larger shrubs, IMO.

Never did coppicing but it should make a lot of straight shoots
My ranting and ramblings on stuff I do. https://archeryrob.wordpress.com/
Primitive archery information I have written https://boweyrsden.wordpress.com/
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