Christmas Chipping

nogie1717
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nogie1717
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Joined: April 6th, 2016, 2:43 pm

December 29th, 2016, 8:00 pm #1

The cold and freezing rain has put a damper on what is typically the best month to hunt pheasants, but I have been able to do some knapping.  Things have been quiet on the abo side here, so hopefully some other folks will post up their work.  Thanks for looking!

This first one is a piece of Georgetown that I dug out of my increasing pile of "I'll finish it later".  Of course, I didn't finish it, but rather than try to get a nice outline, I focused more on the flaking.  I was happy with the results.  Nothing to write home about, but I'm steadily improving.  I could have taken some time to pop out the fingernail hinges, but didn't.



Here is a corner tang from a flake of Burlington I got from Marty's buck a pound deal.


And a project I've been trying to hone in on is the McKean complex (Middle Archaic) as it was fairly common in SD and the point my dad found on our farm a couple years ago (Northern Hanna) was from this group.  I would really like to study some more actual artifacts, but haven't been able to track any down.  Yet.  Anyway, here is my attempt at a McKean.

 
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jtester
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jtester
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Joined: December 26th, 2014, 5:15 pm

December 29th, 2016, 11:57 pm #2

Nice work.
Jim
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Forager
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Forager
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Joined: October 22nd, 2010, 11:42 pm

December 30th, 2016, 6:18 am #3

nogie I like the way you're thinking.

First, it is important to carefully examine artifacts and not just the spectacular ones - the 'every-day' working class points will tell you much more than the classic museum pieces about what authentic Old Time knapping looks like in realistic terms of flaking, thickness, and form. This anchors far more reasonable goals which can be built upon toward greater achievements.

Further, it is to your credit that you are looking to establish successful flaking patterns, the final trimming of such nicely reduced pieces to form is far more satisfying once the fundamental issues are attentively addressed.

Finally, for you to be advancing with such proper priorities in mind while using Old Tools is a distinguishing factor in itself. There are not very many who choose the steep trail, we look forward to seeing wherever the path takes you. Thanks for sharing your work and your motives.
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nogie1717
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nogie1717
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Joined: April 6th, 2016, 2:43 pm

December 30th, 2016, 2:37 pm #4

Thanks, Jim.

Forager, as always, your comments are incredibly helpful and encouraging. I've always wanted to get into primitive hunting and whilst looking at YouTube videos for direction on bow building, I came across a video of a guy making an arrowhead out of a bottle bottom. I thought I should try. The thought that something as simple as a bottle bottom and an antler tine has transformed so much in my life is mind boggling. I am always fascinated by the amazing work I see people do and have nothing against people using modern tools to chip beautiful works of art. But my goal isn't to be a lithic artist, rather I want to know more about the tool stone and stone tools of those who walked this land before my ancestors sailed across the Atlantic from Norway and Germany not so long ago. Well, that and I just love the satisfaction that comes from hitting a rock!!
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boletus
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boletus
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Joined: July 22nd, 2016, 6:15 pm

December 31st, 2016, 12:41 am #5

Well done, Nogie! I really like that corner tang!
-Jason
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BrewerMo
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BrewerMo
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Joined: September 26th, 2015, 3:35 am

December 31st, 2016, 2:37 am #6

Very nice work nogie👍
I started knapping for alot of the same reasons, I wanted to learn more about the artifacts I was hunting.
Keep it up.... Ryan
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1442
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1442
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Joined: February 11th, 2011, 3:20 am

December 31st, 2016, 3:16 pm #7

That is some good looking flake scars you left on it.
Are those done with pressure flaking?
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freeze cracked
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freeze cracked
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Joined: October 30th, 2012, 2:24 am

December 31st, 2016, 3:42 pm #8

ok this right here is a good posting.

i'd be trying to help keep up the activity here but it'd be expensive to pay for all the extra arm/back/neck medications for me and the nausea medications for yall.
i dream of a better world in which chickens can cross roads without having their motives questioned.
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nogie1717
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nogie1717
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Joined: April 6th, 2016, 2:43 pm

December 31st, 2016, 8:56 pm #9

Thanks for the kind words all.

1442 - Yes, that is pressure flaking.
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