chicken fat mushroom

rokchipr
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rokchipr
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10:58 PM - Oct 03, 2014 #1

Anyone familiar with Suillus americanus AKA chicken fat mushroom? I've got a good crop of what I am nearly certain are this mushroom several times a year growing under my Eastern white pine. There are some aging ones under the tree now but it is supposed to rain here tonight and tomorrow so there should be some fresh ones popping up in a few days. I'll attempt to get pictures posted.
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Forager
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Forager
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11:37 PM - Oct 03, 2014 #2

I have collected and partaken of this species. Inoffensive but nothing to write home about however plentiful the production. Still, their value may lie in fleshing out a pan of mixed mushrooms or drying for storage to be mixed in with later-season stews or soups where they contribute or support rather than 'star' in a recipe.

I feel the same about Honey Mushrooms (Armillaria melea) which are painfully taking the place of a number of my favored Hen sites. When I visit them I pat them on their heads wishing them well, glad to see their success but they do not feel the edge of my stone knife nor the confines of my paper bag.




Edit:  Be sure to peel off the slippery cuticle of the cap (it separates readily) as it will contribute nothing to flavor or texture, the literature suggests that it offers only GI distress.  Please let us know your opinion of this one if you choose to try it (and I suspect you will). 
Last edited by Forager on 11:47 PM - Oct 03, 2014, edited 1 time in total.
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caveman2533
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11:38 AM - Oct 04, 2014 #3

Blaise,
Taylor and I were out for a bike ride thru the neighborhood and of course I always have an eye open for mushrrooms. Found  on the corner of one street what I believe to be this same mushroom. There were a lot of them but they were not growing under pines, under maple. They did not look appealing to me so I did not at the time  bring any home for a spore print.  They still don't sound appealing but I may go back and  pull one for a spore print, just to check it off the list. After the fresh rain we are having I want to get out and check for others tomorrow.
Steve Nissly
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caveman2533
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11:07 PM - Oct 04, 2014 #4

I went back today to collect one and do a spore print and the owner had mowed the yard. I did find one that had been spared the edge of the blade and the print of the tire. I also discovered that lo and behold there was also a white pine tree there and a red maple growing side by side, So the statements I was reading online about it growing only under white pine were upheld.
Steve Nissly
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rokchipr
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rokchipr
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11:12 PM - Oct 04, 2014 #5

Thanks for your assessment Forager. I'm convinced we already know the most choice edible fungi but as you have correctly surmised I am still hoping to expand my experience with these offerings from nature. Then again they may be something of a delicacy to my palate. I enjoy the jellies and wood ears that you also find undesirable! Thanks for the caution on peeling the cap, I was aware of the possible GI disturbance on consuming the surface membrane. If there are any available to bring along next weekend I'll certainly add some to my camp gear to have you confirm my ID. On another topic do you enjoy durian? Most find it particularly offensive but I have enjoyed it with gusto on many occasions.

Steve, I know we use the same mushroom field guide so be careful in your identification of this species. I've puzzled over this one on several occasions before arriving at this conclusion. There are several Boletes and Suillus that look similar. Spore print color variations are close and difficult to determine so unless you have very good color acuity correct identification depends on differences in morphology and habitat. There is the barest suggestion of veil remnant on the edge of the cap but none on the stem of this one. The flesh bruises somewhat slowly to a pinkish brown. The pores are attached to the stem and may even descend slightly.

Thank you both for your input.
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rokchipr
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rokchipr
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11:14 PM - Oct 04, 2014 #6

Hans found a large bearded tooth today on a walk!!
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caveman2533
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3:17 AM - Oct 05, 2014 #7

Score on the bearded tooth. Don't worry Blaise, I don't plan to eat any of these Chicken fats. Don't even look appealing to me, just trying to figure out what they are.
Steve Nissly
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