Cheyenne Blanket Strip

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Cheyenne Blanket Strip

Lazy Stitch
Registered User
Joined: 09 Jan 2016, 03:44

30 Oct 2017, 02:31 #1

Just completed this Cheyenne blanket strip as a wedding present for a couple of friends.  It's done up in 13/0 Czechs and 5/0 Italians on brain tan, using linen thread.  The strip is 56" long and about 2.75" wide.  The rosettes are 4" wide. In these photos it's laid out on the Pendleton blanket where it will live.  With luck, it will get sewn down tomorrow.

Cheyenne Blanket Strip.JPG Cheyenne Blanket Strip Rosettes.JPG
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

30 Oct 2017, 19:53 #2

Pendleton has the licence to weave Hudson's Bay Company blankets in North America.  
Your bead blanket strip is a magnificent addition.  A gift to hold forever.
Is there an interpretation of the patterns that we should learn?

I too, have used HBC blankets as wedding gifts.  
Apparently in Canada, we still get the ones milled in England.
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Lazy Stitch
Registered User
Joined: 09 Jan 2016, 03:44

31 Oct 2017, 03:21 #3

Hi Robson Valley -  Many thanks for the kind words.  Wow  -those British can sure weave some wool.  Love these Pendletons, especially this classic Hudson Bay design, which is part of Pendleton's national park series.  This is their Glacier National Park blanket, and my friends who are getting this got engaged in Glacier, so it seems a fitting blanket for them.  I have one just like it that I bought 25 years ago at the Pendleton mill, in Oregon, so now I guess I gotta get around to finally making a strip for that one!

Nothing terribly special about those designs.  The rosettes are one of numerous permutations on that design type that you see in Cheyenne beadwork, and I've seen variations on many blanket strips that are attributed as Cheyenne. The linear designs on the strip are not typical of most blanket strips, but these sorts of stripe patterns are very common on Cheyenne beadwork, particularly pipe bags and women's half leggings.  The original of this strip caught my eye, so I altered it a bit for the colors that I had and swapped out the original rosette design for these.  I have seen this same linear striped design fairly commonly on Sioux shirts, so you could also for a Sioux attribution, but I think that the rosettes push it more toward Cheyenne.  You sometimes see such mixing of designs on pieces where the tribes lived in proximity or if, say, a Cheyenne beadworker married in to a Sioux family, or vice versa.  Perhaps I should just opt for "Northern Plains"....... 
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Robson Valley
Registered User
Joined: 24 Apr 2015, 00:27

31 Oct 2017, 04:09 #4

HBC was incorporated in 1671.  I don't know when their design of indigo/red/yellow/green got started but there's nothing like it on earth.
There's so much art and carving in 4 styles here in the Pacific Northwest that it's all too easy to neglect the accomplishments of the plains people.  I'd like to learn more but so much of it is filtered and biased by the opinions of non-natives.

I'm building a collection for my own library.  I have found some very big, very obscure and modestly priced used volumes which photograph collections
in museums.  Store owner buys estate sales.  Every couple of months I drop by.  She knows what I'm looking for.
I'm travelling, living out of a suitcase again.  When I get home next week, I'll scour my titles for Cheyenne work.
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