Any book recommendations on Paleolithic America?

azmdted
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azmdted
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March 7th, 2018, 4:14 pm #1

Hi folks,

I know that the history is being revised frequently as new finds offer new theories or support old ones.  Given that, do you have any recommendations for historically accurate books that discuss the theories, archeology, technology and history of the migration and population of the Americas?  Ideally, something between a text book and historical fiction.  I always enjoyed the way Steven Ambrose wrote history, even if he may have had a few troubles along the way.

Thanks,

Ted
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Robson Valley
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March 9th, 2018, 1:09 am #2

There are rapidly changing differences of opinion regarding routes of population the Americas.
The very current archaeological literature is likely the best resource.  
Saying that, the facts won't make the textbooks for another couple of years.
The archaeological news web sites are a good read, always = fresh discoveries and publications.
Next week, everything could change.

If you want to read useful and factually accurate accounts of North American paleo culture, source books abound.
I have been content to limit my interests to the Pacific Northwest First Nations cultures
 so I have rarely looked for eastern references..
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Tomas
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Tomas
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March 9th, 2018, 10:19 am #3

Hello Ted

Here are some free online books from the 1800’s that gives a rather good over view of Ancient America with some great illustrations... it includes the Mound Builders of my native Ohio and they could be considered Paleo by culture...they hunted a now extinct woodland Buffalo....hope you enjoy....

Ancient America, in notes on American archaeology

https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_1fREA ... 0/mode/1up

https://archive.org/stream/bub_gb_1fREA ... search/249


THE MOUND BUILDERS
by J.P. MacLEAN


https://archive.org/stream/moundbuilder ... 9/mode/1up


https://archive.org/stream/moundbuilder ... /search/65


All The Best

Tomas
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azmdted
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azmdted
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March 9th, 2018, 1:46 pm #4

Thank you both for your suggestions.  I will check the online books.  I've been doing some research and decided to get:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005WVRSHA?re ... ore_sample

First Peoples in a New World:  Colonizing Ice Age America

I've been reading the sample on Amazon and I'm enjoying the author's writing style and presentation.  It's 11 years old but will at least give me a baseline from which I can then catch up with more current scholarly journals.  I like this book also because it seems to tell why the scientific community thinks what it does and not just what it thinks.  Being naturally inquisitive and skeptical I enjoy knowing the why, and the limitations.

I welcome more recommendations as well.
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Tomas
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March 9th, 2018, 11:07 pm #5

Hello Ted

Late Pleistocene archaeology and ecology in the far Northeast
by Chapdelaine, Claude; Association des archéologues du Québec


https://archive.org/details/Late_Pleist ... e_Chapdela

Journey to the Ice Age: Discovering an Ancient World
by Peter L. Storck

Description
Product description
At the end of the Ice Age, small groups of hunter-gatherers crossed from Siberia to Alaska and opened the last chapter in the human settlement of the earth. Many left little or no trace. But one group--the Early Paleo-Indians--exploded suddenly on the archaeological record about 11,500 years ago and expanded rapidly throughout North America and, eventually, into South America.

Journey to the Ice Age focuses on the Early Paleo-Indians of northeastern North America. A revealing, autobiographical account, it is at once a captivating record of Storck’s archaeological discoveries, as well as an introduction to the practice, challenges, and spirit of archaeology.
Review
All too often archaeology is presented as the fabulous and dramatic discovery of a lost civilization. The truth is that it is a sometimes dreary and inescapably human pursuit, where much of the drama exists in the rivalry between archaeologists and the politics of the profession. In Journey to the Ice Age, Peter Storck marries these harsh realities to the excitement of discovery, and ties it all together with his own experience of both. (Jay Ingram, author, The Velocity of Honey, and host of the Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet )

I love this book. If I had Peter Storck’s writing skill and his introspective view of the world, this is the kind of book I would like to write. It is at once a compelling, personal narrative and an introduction to the process of hypothesis testing and revision that archaeologists use to keep their work oriented toward a problem they wish to solve ... informative ... evocative ...insight into, the past lifeways of Paleoindian people, as well as a thorough understanding of how difficult it is to explore such ancient lifeways through sutdy of the meagre remains fond in archaeological sites that are 10 000 or more years old ... the reader learns a lot about Paleoindians and the environments in which they lived and also a lot about prehistoric archaeology (Richard Morlan, Canadian Museum of Civilization, Gatineau, Quebec Canadian Journal of Archaeology, 28, 2004)

This is two books in one, a journey through time to meet the people living on the beaches of ice age lakes, and a personal journey of the scientist who found them. Storck’s narrative is a delightful tale of science in action and a lifetime dedicated to the people of long ago. It has forever changed my view of the Ontario landscape. (Bob McDonald, host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks)

This is an autobiographical account by a curator of the Royal Ontario Museum, relating his archaeological discoveries while tracing the peoples who came over to America from Siberia at the end of the Ice Age. It is an exciting and education read. A truly wonderful book. (Ronald F. MacIsaac The Lower Island News 2006-06-01)

This book will open the consciousness of North Americans to the ancient world that surrounds their daily lives. Familiar landscapes will carry new significance as the settings for primeval iceberg-laden seas, exotic animals, and peoples whose way of life is totally alien to that of the modern world. (Robert McGhee, author of Ancient People of the Arctic)

At the end of the Ice Age, small groups of hunter-gatherers crossed from Siberia to Alaska and opened the last chapter in the human settlement of the earth. Many left little or no trace. But one group – the Early Paleo-Indians – exploded suddenly on the archaeological record about 11,500 years ago and expanded rapidly throughout North America and, eventually, into South America.
Why was this group so successful? To understand this, we need to know how they coped with change and different Ice Age environments. This book, by archaeologist and curator Peter Storck, focuses on the challenges faced by the Early Paleo-Indians of northeastern North America. A revealing, autobiographical account, Journey to the Ice Age is at once a captivating record of Storck’s archaeological discoveries, as well as an introduction to the practice, challenges, and spirit of archaeology.
Whether you’re in your teens or in your 80s, if you’ve ever wanted to roll back the present and see the landscape of the past, this book is sure to delight you. Designed to take readers on their own journey to the Ice Age, the book includes a guided tour across ancient beaches, through glacially scoured valleys, and up into formerly remote highlands – places evocative of another geological epoch and which contain hidden traces of Southern Ontario’s, and Canada’s, founding peoples. Of interest to both professional and amateur, student and teacher, specialist and novice, this personal, often evocative, account is bound to satisfy anyone who’s ever yearned to ask an archaeologist: How do you know where to dig? Why do you do what you do? Or what does it all mean?

Review
"I love this book! If I had Peter Storck's writing skill and his introspective view of the world, this is the kind of book I would like to write. ' Journey to the Ice Age' has an interesting structure. Along with the Acknowledgements, it provides essential background information. Eight chapters follow, each of which interweaves the story of Peter's personal experience with three other elements: 1) partial reprints of ROM (Royal Ontario Museum) newsletters, often written from the field; 2) summaries of facts the reader needs to know to follow the story; and 3) illustrations with lengthy, informative captions. Peter's sense of humour shines like little sparkles in the midst of his well crafted prose. Who else could refer to the birth of his first child as a visit 'by my avian namesake' (p40)? ."― Choice
"A passionate yet consummately erudite account of Storck's intellectual odyssey from young scientist to pre―eminent scholar of Ice Age archaeology . . . combined with a remarkably intimate portrait of the Ice Age people that Storck has been tracking for his entire professional career."―Bradley Lepper, Ohio Historical Society

Book Description
Peter Storck takes readers on an fascinating odyssey in this personal account of the archaeological discoveries that highlight his 30 year career.
About the Author
Peter L. Storck is Senior Curator Emeritus at the Department of Anthropology, Royal Ontario Museum.

Tomas
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Tomas
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March 10th, 2018, 12:10 am #6

Hello Ted

Here is a novel suggestion..some in the scientific community now cite the concept of studying the descendants of still living cultures to understand how their Paleo ancestors may have lived.

Below are examples of the genetic links between ancient Siberian people and the near cousins Native Americans.

The suggestion is that study and experience of the Siberian people can give insights into any discovery about the Paleo-Americans....hope you enjoy this suggestion....

Native Genetics

https://www.google.com/amp/s/phys.org/n ... enetic.amp

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.rbth.c ... 141559/amp

Altai

http://www.pavelfilatov.com/gall/Altai_People/mini.php

http://osoznanie.org/1536-sila-shamanskih-obryadov.html

Chuckchi



All The Best

Tomas
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azmdted
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March 10th, 2018, 12:48 am #7

Tomas,

Thank you for all the information, it’s much appreciated. 

Ted
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Robson Valley
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March 12th, 2018, 9:19 pm #8

Here's a primary source which could fill in some information from the Pacific Northwest.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesup_Nor ... Expedition
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