Another shaving horse

BillOregon
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BillOregon
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Joined: March 14th, 2004, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2008, 4:16 pm #1

Built this one yesterday using Tom's fine plans as a basis, but modifying the dumbhead design so as to avoid getting it out of a 4 X 6. As result, mine likely will not be as durable as Tom's. I also took into consideration his comment about wanting to be able to adjust the angle of the work board, accommodating this by allowing a slip-fit of the 2 X 6 brace and pegging it with red osier dowels greased with home-made bullet lubricant. Now my only excuse for not turning out some bows is my utter lack of skill; I have the equipment.


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BillOregon
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BillOregon
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Joined: March 14th, 2004, 12:00 am

November 10th, 2008, 5:21 pm #2

Well, it feels very good to be making a pile of yew shavings with the drawknife again. I can already see room for improving the horse. First, I need to narrow and reshape the tongue of the work board to allow getting more angle with the drawknife on the piece being worked. I also will add leather padding to better grip the work, and suspect a sprinkle of powdered ponderosa pine pitch would give a more rosin-like grip. Further, I find myself scooting backward as I push forward with the feet on the bottom of the clamp. Two solutions: add a bumstopper that my tush can brace against, or hit the pints and chips hard and put on some tummy. The latter sounds more fun, the former more sensible.
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Rocks in Head
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Rocks in Head
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Joined: January 29th, 2007, 2:10 pm

November 13th, 2008, 5:16 pm #3

That looks great. I think you just inspired me to put one together. been wanting to for a long time now. Id be interested to see your improvements too.
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BillOregon
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BillOregon
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Joined: March 14th, 2004, 12:00 am

November 13th, 2008, 6:10 pm #4

Rocks: Still working out the bum stopper, but adding leather to the clamping surfaces helps hold the work and prevent dents. By the way, I used 2X12 fir for the bench, 48 inches long with 15-inch legs.
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spoons
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spoons
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Joined: January 28th, 2009, 1:49 am

March 28th, 2009, 1:42 am #5

Try using one foot on the treadle keep the other kind of under you pushing with both , it tends to help hold you where you want to be. Have used many of these horses since the first back in 70 , Like to make the height of the table as an extension of your arm when sitting on the seat. A suggestion add a triangular brace on both sides of each end with the legs or else its going to get wobbley might also cut an inverted v in both legs will help set evener on the ground Also you might try moving the pivot point on the treadle upward to give yourself more mechanical advantage , so you dont have to push so hard to hold the piece of work. Look at the horses on my posts that follow.
Last edited by spoons on April 13th, 2009, 10:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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spoons
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spoons
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Joined: January 28th, 2009, 1:49 am

April 13th, 2009, 2:44 am #6

Here are some images of my own shaving horse as well as History1800's and YounGrasshopper's. Mine is the "lightweight" of the bunch. YounGrasshopper's was completed this past week. I have step-by-step images of YounGrasshopper's as we built it. The horse with the bow staves leaning against it is History1800's. It was his preference to have just the 3 legs. Note the cat with it's front feet on the treadle...it's really all the pressure you should need!


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YounGrasshopper
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YounGrasshopper
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Joined: April 13th, 2009, 2:56 am

April 13th, 2009, 2:56 am #7

I took Spoons advise and built my treadle longer and heavier to use little force to keep my piece stable to work on. Less fatigue on my legs for all day projects.
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