The place of women in modern PNG society

The place of women in modern PNG society

Mangi Nating
Mangi Nating

March 4th, 2004, 10:13 am #1

It would be interesting to gauge the opinion of all on where women stand, or should stand in our society in the twenty first century.

It does not have to be from the female perspective only.
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LunaSun
LunaSun

March 4th, 2004, 11:51 am #2

hey mangi nating,

the place of PNG women is like this today (21st century PNG).

5% Front of hubby
At the moment a few of our sisters are right up there and doing fine. Some will surely follow. I'd like to tell you that these women hold some executive positions, academic positions, and some are just good leaders. Some examples are: Susan Setae, Meg. Taylor, Prof Cecilia Nembou, Rosa Kambou, Dr. Jane Mogina, etc.

75% Beside hubby
These include the majority of PNG woman who have a good understanding relationship with their communities and families. These woman are the cream of PNG society today. They are responsible for the day to day running of their families and PNG customs. Remember some do that besides their carreers. Some of these women will some day reach the top 5%.

15% Behind hubby
Saddly, these woman will not have any opportunity of moving forward, because the hubby thinks her place is "in the house" (meri, em blong haus). Some that come from disadvantaged educational background will fall into this category also.

5% Stap longlong
These include the ones who have no idea of what's going on. They-just-hanging-loose.

This is how I interpret your posting. I refrain from posting comments on how, they should conduct themselves, what they should do/not do, or what is expected of them. I think we are moving forward (disregarding the economic situation), so one should look at the PNG women as who they are, and not what the menfolk-think-who-they-are.

What yu think ppls?

As for me, if I get married she'll have equal status with me. Should she move forward, I'll give her all my blessings.

LunaSun
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 5th, 2004, 12:32 am #3



Lunasun i hope you keep your word, its not that easy
im married with few kids have to struggle everyday to bring my family up .
two years ago my wife decided to go back to school and she graduated with papers in two different fields which made me think hard about how women can do alot of
things which we men think along the lines impossibility . i will support any female that wants to do better in life.

commenting from outside of png(migrated to NZ 20 years ago..
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Joined: January 30th, 2003, 3:42 am

March 5th, 2004, 12:41 pm #4

today and beyond 2000 PNG is moving rapidly with the world ... and women need to be treated equally in any profession ...should she be on the top let her be ....i call that professional and a country moving forward however let me bring another question whats the role of man towards women in the 21st century

Squiler



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LunaSun
LunaSun

March 5th, 2004, 12:42 pm #5


Lunasun i hope you keep your word, its not that easy
im married with few kids have to struggle everyday to bring my family up .
two years ago my wife decided to go back to school and she graduated with papers in two different fields which made me think hard about how women can do alot of
things which we men think along the lines impossibility . i will support any female that wants to do better in life.

commenting from outside of png(migrated to NZ 20 years ago..
hey,
what did i said that "i should keep my word?" all my comments were my statistical opinion of png women today...21st century!!!!

only statement i made is i'd treat my woman as an equal partner (Last Paragraph) ...which i'll keep my word on.

but thanks for your view and a big salute for your wife ...yu are one lucky hell-of-a-man with a gal like that.

LunaSun
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 7th, 2004, 8:53 pm #6


Yes you were a right last paragraph.
Its just that alot of Png men dont normally say that.
Sorry did i offend you, if i did than im sorry.
I believe we both have same views towards women.

Keep supporting.

Best regards from NZ.

RakRak.
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EQUALISER
EQUALISER

March 8th, 2004, 5:29 am #7

Woman these days can do almost anything from earning big bucks to driving tractors so watch out gents..give them equal status or else ol bai panelbitim yumi..
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LunaSun
LunaSun

March 8th, 2004, 1:31 pm #8

It would be interesting to gauge the opinion of all on where women stand, or should stand in our society in the twenty first century.

It does not have to be from the female perspective only.
hey guys,

rak rak: you are welcome, appology accepted

manki nating: if the gals panelbeat the menfolk, then dont panic. they will only be "paying back", coz they have been panelbeaten many times ... and remember in PNG, we live in a "payback" society.

LunaSun
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Mangi Nating
Mangi Nating

March 9th, 2004, 1:41 am #9

Hi LunaSun, Anonymous (assuming there is one of you), Squiler, Equalizer and all.

Lol Lunasun, I think I know of a couple of guys that have been literally panel-beaten by their wives.

...

As to the number of women getting into positions of power, it has certainly increased since Independence, except in those areas where women have traditionally been granted equal status (The Trobriand Islands for example). I'm referring here to your 'in front of hubby' classification.

I wont dispute your statistics, it's really just a matter of opinion, but I don't think you are too far out.

I'd like to raise some more issues, which I'm sure you all will have opinions on. This is just a discussion so I think it's right for everyone to have their say, even if it may not be politically correct.

1.
Olsem, mi tingting long ol dispela meri yu callim ol 'stap longlong'. If we hold that the family is the basic unit in society and that it is one of the greatest influences on a human being in its formative years, then surely we have to ensure that the family creates an environment where the child can grow to be physically and mentally healthy; that whatever influences it receives from home should be positive.
If ol dispela meri ol stap longlong eventually become mothers, how will they impart to their children those values that are necessary to ensure they lead productive lives?


2.
What about the effects of feminism and other related ideas. The 'emancipation' of the female from male dominated society. This could translate into expressions of sexuality (like our present contests in the clubs, pubs etc), a changed outlook on a woman's place in marriage, conflict with the traditional system of marriage, family responsibilities etc..

3.
Another issue would be changing perceptions of the place of women in society from the more educated male population, and how (if this is desirable) this 'philosophy' could be spread to other areas.

4.
Perhaps a more controversial issue, and one which I think shows my bias, is the number of women that are engaging in what is virtually prostitution, by marrying foreign men with money (Note the qualification). The primary motivation in these situations seems to be the economic payoff and no consideration is made for the offspring from such a union, that is whether the child will be confused about its ethnicity, what allegiance (if any) it would plead and to which country etc...

5.
And finally to the topical issue of Bride Price.
Is this traditional practice still relevant? I'll hold my tongue till I've heard what others think.
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Inmate
Inmate

March 10th, 2004, 3:39 am #10

Dear Mangi Nating

I couldn’t resist weighing in on the discussion so here is my take / 2 cents worth.

On “emancipation of females … and their place in a male dominated society”

Women rise only as high as we men let them to rise and this applies equally in the family unit as well as in the broader community. As an example I know a professional family where the man of the house made a conscious deliberate choice to let his better half develop intellectually and professionally, so that she could stand head to head with him in those areas. He took the role of the home-maker for several years and allowed the wife to first finish a degree and then follow that up with a postgraduate degree. There seems to have been little conflict due to those choices – in fact it has probably strengthened the family unit as both realise that each is dependent on the other for success and whatever has been attained is due very much to and belongs to all members of the family. As for the possibility of blurring their roles – that has not happen yet perhaps because of their strong religious affiliations where understanding of traditional male/female roles is firmly entrenched. I believe a strong religious base (namely Christianity) has both a unifying as well as a liberating role.
Feminism has probably contributed to the dislocation and breakdown of the family unit because it advocates a complete break with the traditional male female roles, which in turn leads to the blurring of roles and disappearance of the need for role models. Perhaps that could explain the rise in same sex relationship making headlines today. Seems to me the Christian model of marital harmony is the best – men and women being equal partners in the business of raising the family. After all Eve was formed from the bone take from Adams side (ribs) not from his foot as some men think in the treatment of their wives.

On “Women and supposed ‘Prostitution’ for economic reasons”

Most women by nature have a strong inborn instinct for preservation and ensuring the survival of the species – ie they will do everything within their power to protect and provide for their children, their husband and all that they count as precious. As such many women who marry for economic reasons could in fact be driven by the desire to provide for parents and siblings. I know of several (wife’s) cousins who married Australians and now, residents in Brisbane are the family’s sole providers. Often I believe they do so at a cost to their own happiness because many are living in relationships that are close to ‘hell on earth’. That to my mind is a selfless act and constitutes an ultimate sacrifice. Nothing could be taken away from them for making such a costly sacrifice.

As for prostitution in the normal sense of the term, I am inclined to think that it’s endurance as the oldest vice and profession is primarily due to two reasons apart from the more obvious (consequences of sin) of course. Both are male related.

 Like any commodity it can only be traded if there is demand. Men want it so it is available. Without demand it there would be no prostitution.

 Prostitution is an indictment on the part of fathers and husbands and is often the result their dereliction of duty to adequately provide and care for their dependents. Mothers and daughters are driven into despair and prostitution because of the need to provide for the family. I concede there are exceptions.

On “Relevance of Bride Price”

While this writer has never had to pay a single toea for his bride price, it is my observation after a number of years of married bliss that the institution is relevant today even though it gets abused by both unscrupulous parents as well as the groom. By that I mean some parents think the groom and his people have an endless vault of cash rivalling that of the BoPNG so they try to extract the maximum possible compensation for their daughter. On the other hand the groom thinks the bride price is a licence for him to use her as a punching bag.
Abuses aside let me enumerate my reasons even though my evidence is anecdotal.

From a parent’s point of view, a daughter is equal to several sons, therefore raising her up is prime investment. Note that this is without factoring in the Bride Price she will fetch later. The simple reasons are that they view her as more likely to be around in the time of their need –whether that be in sickness or old age, than a son. She is more likely to show sympathy, demonstrate care, tenderness and regard for their situation and actually provide for them even to their dying day than a son. As men we have shifting loyalties and a penchant for being swayed more to our wives people, even to the point of neglecting and absconding from our filial duties. Unless of course our spouses show a better spirit than us, which means they take care of both sides of the family without favour or bias. In which case the groom’s parents have really gained a daughter without losing a son. Pity the poor family blessed only with sons!


Cheers

Inmate

PS That’s a year’s write up so I think I’ll retire after posting this.
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