Telikom of the future

Telikom of the future

A.S
A.S

July 4th, 2006, 10:42 am #1

Wantoks

This is not a an official Telikom posting. This posting is an experiment to see if I can generate ideas from young creative Papua New Guineans who have constructive, imaginative, ideas as to how Telikom can become an enabler of PNG's national development - what Telikom can do to enhance the country's development by assisting PNG overcome the technological divide. Put down your ideas and suggestions here.....

Thanks

Anthony Smare

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mangi antap
mangi antap

July 4th, 2006, 5:02 pm #2

Majority of our people live in villages with no access to phones and I feel Telikom has no credibility until it does something for average PNGs. Rural development keeps people in the village.

Long lasting satellite phones for rural areas should be the highest priority to be addressed before any further improvement of town services. To overcome problems with pay phones should require the phone cards use only. Village trade stores could sell the phone calls. To lower vandalism maybe phones could be requested and managed by local churches only and the phone installed right next to the church.

My thoughts.
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Ralph Hamilton
Ralph Hamilton

July 4th, 2006, 10:24 pm #3

Telephone to heaven,
Always on the line...la-la-lala

Eat your heart out Johnny Cash

Hehehe......Ralph.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 5th, 2006, 1:20 am #4

Majority of our people live in villages with no access to phones and I feel Telikom has no credibility until it does something for average PNGs. Rural development keeps people in the village.

Long lasting satellite phones for rural areas should be the highest priority to be addressed before any further improvement of town services. To overcome problems with pay phones should require the phone cards use only. Village trade stores could sell the phone calls. To lower vandalism maybe phones could be requested and managed by local churches only and the phone installed right next to the church.

My thoughts.
It has to be PNG, it is the most difficult country in the world.

Hope there's a better network and phone companies in PNG. Does PNG own a phone network company or nogat? Olsem mi laik save.
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responder
responder

July 5th, 2006, 1:38 am #5

Before it was PTC belongs to the state, then it was sold in the privatisation process when the govt approves it, now its a private company called TELIKOM. Olsem kampani blo PNG steret. So rural communication must serve the best interest of the company and not the state=people.

Em tasol.
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JY
JY

July 5th, 2006, 2:05 am #6

Wantoks

This is not a an official Telikom posting. This posting is an experiment to see if I can generate ideas from young creative Papua New Guineans who have constructive, imaginative, ideas as to how Telikom can become an enabler of PNG's national development - what Telikom can do to enhance the country's development by assisting PNG overcome the technological divide. Put down your ideas and suggestions here.....

Thanks

Anthony Smare
Lets have the District roll-out of Telikom services similar to the Treasury roll-out which was done recent in some parts of the country. Every district and sub districts should have access to telecommunication services. Firstly, land-line telephones (not mobile phones) must be installed, this is because cost of call using the land-line telephone is much cheaper than the mobile phone call charges. Secondly, this same telecommunciation infrastructure can be used for internet services, which can be deployed to governement establishments and schools within the districts or sub districts.

The roll-out should be through microwave instead of satellite. The reason are;

1. Road network in the country is very limited and people will have difficulty getting to the nearest service centre, this means that we need many installations to extend the service.

2. It would be cheaper to extend the current microwave coverage than to use satellite terminals becuase of reason number 1.

3. Satellite system has bandwidth limitations as a result would be difficult and may be too costly to upgrade to carter for increase number of users.

What I can see as a suitable solution for data networks is to have one high bandwidth connection to a service provider. This cannection can be from the provincial capital or and nearest point of connection. The connection to districts can be done through WiMax. WiMax is a new technology basically aiming Metropolitant Area Network (MAN). This provides a better quality of services for the data, and even voice if Voice-over-IP (VOIP) will be implemeted. This is probably the cheapest means of extending the data and voice services to outlying rural districts. WiMax uses microwave and thus require license to operate and that has to be purchase from PANGTEL, unlike the Wireless LAN that uses 2.4 GHz in the ISM band which is free to operate.


Lets have more from you guys.
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Passing By
Passing By

July 5th, 2006, 4:53 am #7

Wantoks

This is not a an official Telikom posting. This posting is an experiment to see if I can generate ideas from young creative Papua New Guineans who have constructive, imaginative, ideas as to how Telikom can become an enabler of PNG's national development - what Telikom can do to enhance the country's development by assisting PNG overcome the technological divide. Put down your ideas and suggestions here.....

Thanks

Anthony Smare
Telikom is a commercial entity. Their priority is to make profit. Not investing in networks that cannot sustain itself! Any Rural network or Community Services Obligation (CSO) should be encourage, but with total Govt support in terms of Tax credit scheme, letting Telikom retain portions of the Dividence it pays to the Govt or assisting Telikom(or any other competitor) access donor Aid funding. Otherwise it will be unacheivable simply because it would be uneconomical.
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wire
wire

July 5th, 2006, 6:23 am #8

Wantoks

This is not a an official Telikom posting. This posting is an experiment to see if I can generate ideas from young creative Papua New Guineans who have constructive, imaginative, ideas as to how Telikom can become an enabler of PNG's national development - what Telikom can do to enhance the country's development by assisting PNG overcome the technological divide. Put down your ideas and suggestions here.....

Thanks

Anthony Smare
I think microwave would still be a better option for PNG simply because of cost factor. For remote locations, where fear of vandalism exists, the service should be located in places like schools, mission stations, or even in the middle of villages where there are always people around.
The current microwave links should be extended to areas which are not currently covered and receivers should be placed in such locations as mentioned above.
We should then encourage tradestore owners in rural areas to sell Telikad for people to use

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datacomms
datacomms

July 5th, 2006, 6:30 am #9

Wantoks

This is not a an official Telikom posting. This posting is an experiment to see if I can generate ideas from young creative Papua New Guineans who have constructive, imaginative, ideas as to how Telikom can become an enabler of PNG's national development - what Telikom can do to enhance the country's development by assisting PNG overcome the technological divide. Put down your ideas and suggestions here.....

Thanks

Anthony Smare
I think the idea here is to have Telecommunication available to the majority of Papua New Guineans. Most who are disadvantaged at the moment are in the rural areas. So we should think of ways of making telecommunication available to them all the time..ie having the service operating all the time..
The cost factor should be considered as well from Telikoms side as well as the users end.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 6th, 2006, 2:56 am #10

It is always more expensive to provide services to low density (ie rural) populations compared to urban ones. That's why privatisation can be such a disaster to rural people because once the whole operation become profit making, rural services are discarded to focus more on the more profitable urban services.

In the end, whether Telikom serves the majority of the people of PNG depends on the extent to which government regulates basic utilities, such as water, power, fuel, and telephones. In other countries, those operations may be private but the companies are held to a ceiling profit, and they may be required to dedicate a proportion of their resources to the unprofitable rural services.

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