PNG Women

PNG Women

Meri Wau
Meri Wau

November 26th, 2010, 4:56 am #1

When there has been a very relevant issue such as the 22 reserved seats for women,I find it hard to believe that women are not interested in posting on this issue,or other important topics.
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hah
hah

November 29th, 2010, 11:50 pm #2


I suppose the 22 reserved seats for women in the parliament is an irrelevant.

I say 'its irrelevant'.

Think of it this way - with the NA led government today all most head of department are sepiks.
And if NA wants to continue its regime in all provinces - nothing can stop them from appointing 22 Sepik women into these seats to represent 22 provinces.

How about girlie girlies - can they qualify for these seats too?

By the way - I see png democracy as womencrazy



hah

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Typical Bloke
Typical Bloke

November 30th, 2010, 4:46 am #3

If Rooney, Abaijah, Kidu won and got into Parliament through the normal process, what prevents other women from achieving the same?
I am over this idea of creating reserved seat for women, I wonder if these new positions have been costed and we know how much it'll cost to have these positions?
There is so much administrative costs already and nothing is changing on the grounds, I dont know what good these positions will do for development and it will be first in the world.

For it to even be considered or given any approval, I would suggest:
1) One of the open electorates in each province must be dissolved and the districts absorbed into surrounded open electorate to make way for this new positions or the
2) governor's seat should be reserved for the Women only

Otherwise there is no point talking, PNG is democratic country and I believe women have equal rights and therefore if they are interested they should fight it out in the normal elections to get elected.

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Stret Toka
Stret Toka

November 30th, 2010, 10:44 am #4

PNG a democratic country....come on! It is common knowlege that all pollies buy their seats for parliment....in the form of handouts and bribes....who are we kidding here. There is no level playingfield to begin with.

If reserving seats for women bypasses all that corruption then we might actually get some decent politicians and I am all for it.
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Meri Wau
Meri Wau

December 3rd, 2010, 12:21 am #5

Don't forget that the 22 reserved seats were originally supposed to replace the Governor's seats which were to be abolished but 22 strong and powerful Governors are not going to allow this to happen even though their duties are duplicated by Open Members.
How can we talk about the cost after the recent increases awarded to MP's with almost no dissension and probably no debate.Just a house full of "ayes"
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tjja tjja
tjja tjja

December 3rd, 2010, 6:42 am #6

Truely if the 22 seats are passed..we will see Mrs Somare , Mrs Chan, Auther Somare, Bryon Chan..Micheal Somare and Julius Chan all in parliament shouting "aye" to any corrupt bill more loudly then what their duing now in the seclusion of their homes..
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Meri Wau
Meri Wau

December 3rd, 2010, 11:17 pm #7

So,are you saying that all PNG politicians are being controlled by their wives sitting at home or are you saying that all women leaders will be controlled by their husbands?
From my observation,most women leaders(not all) are either widowed,divorced or too smart to have been shackled by a husband in the first place- otherwise how would they have the time to become leaders in their own right?
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ctpubprowler
ctpubprowler

December 4th, 2010, 5:36 am #8

wau! let me tell you a story.

Dont know about wives cheering ayes at homes for husbands in tambarna haus but these so called single and widowed women do gang up and pub prowl in pom ct hooking up to any very married men in clubs.

They are easy prey for club goes too. Have a list of the most notorious six single women former leaders and senior govs offices holders.
I guess they love to get noticed with those heavy make ups they wear.

Ct pubprowler
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aspless
aspless

January 17th, 2011, 8:12 am #9

reserved seats for women? then what about the other minorities? reseved seats for disabled, reserve seats for gays, reserved seats for over 40s, reserved seats for insane people. what oh no thats already done we have a full parliament of idiots. No we need for them to stand and win the normal way on merit.
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YuGuess?
YuGuess?

October 23rd, 2011, 11:04 am #10

So,are you saying that all PNG politicians are being controlled by their wives sitting at home or are you saying that all women leaders will be controlled by their husbands?
From my observation,most women leaders(not all) are either widowed,divorced or too smart to have been shackled by a husband in the first place- otherwise how would they have the time to become leaders in their own right?
You know what, the answer to directly influencing Politics in PNG could be stirring yous right in the face!

It is encouraging to see our citizens seeking to meaningfully participate in our development as a country. The focus of late is to participate in decision making at the National Parliament and much talk has been on our women folks who are seeking a position of power that will enable them to equally influence, create or enforce government policy at the local level government, provincial or national level.

The 22 Reserve Seats for Women Bill which is currently before Parliament for further deliberation is an option many women activists believe when passed will give access to our women to become more influential. However, I would like to think that women have been influencing decision making for a long time now but tediously doing this behind the scenes. Look at our prominent politicians and the women behind them. I got no doubts that these politicians would have confided with their wives on numerous policies and these women, who are currently of less significance from a public perspective, would have had some inputs that decided on the final outcome of their politician husbands’ decisions or policies.

As an indirect and alternate approach in our women folk’s attempts to gain equal influence in decision making in parliament, our women activists may want to also consider focusing on influencing our politicians’ wives. If you cannot win them over then you have a lower chance of getting their husbands to vote for the 22 Reserve Seats for Women Bill.

Should the current women’s Bill not pass then this fall back option could be pursued as a strategy in the attempts to directly influencing politics in Papua New Guinea by targeting these 'powerful' women behind the scenes.

Em olsem 2 toea tingting blo mi tasol.
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