PNG Professionals Vs Expatriates

PNG Professionals Vs Expatriates

Mosong
Mosong

July 12th, 2011, 10:26 pm #1

The current labour policy framework in PNG was adapted from Australia in the 1960. There is a huge gap with the expatriate and learned / educated PNG professionals.

Do you think it is about time PNG professional stood up and addressed this matter?
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Wel
Wel

July 13th, 2011, 3:11 am #2

Bro..mi lukim go na give up na mi resign from formal employment and I'm, now planting Oil Palm in Kimbe.
Our Govt can't even look at such things and address it at all
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West
West

July 15th, 2011, 3:40 am #3

Our workers have no voice, we need political activists and lobbyist to get workers rights and wages protected and enhanced. The so called unions are useless dogs..all bark with no bite.
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Mangi Nating
Mangi Nating

July 16th, 2011, 4:38 am #4

The current labour policy framework in PNG was adapted from Australia in the 1960. There is a huge gap with the expatriate and learned / educated PNG professionals.

Do you think it is about time PNG professional stood up and addressed this matter?
Papua New Guinean workers are second class citizens in their own land. In other countries (say the U.S) there was institutional racism that kept the non-white population out of the top jobs. Not so today.

In Papua New Guinea, we ourselves have kept apartheid-era style systems of pay that discriminate based solely on the color of one's skin. If you are a Papua New Guinean with the same level of education and training, you will get paid 1/20th the salary of an expatriate simply because you are not white.

It is mind-blowingly stupid why we should let this injustice prevail in the 21st century. The only way I see now for a Papua New Guinean to get equal pay with other HUMAN BEINGS dammit - is if he or she emigrates and works abroad.

And I will go mad if I hear one of these idiots with ties in Waigani ask, "WHY THE BRAIN DRAIN?"
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Talapia
Talapia

July 16th, 2011, 9:53 am #5

Where are the workers Unions? I think they are the people who are supposed to look at this and come up with some better ways of protecting nationals.
I know of cases were expats come in as consultants and end up occupying a full-time position.
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let's NOT look at govt for examples
let's NOT look at govt for examples

July 16th, 2011, 11:13 am #6

Papua New Guinean workers are second class citizens in their own land. In other countries (say the U.S) there was institutional racism that kept the non-white population out of the top jobs. Not so today.

In Papua New Guinea, we ourselves have kept apartheid-era style systems of pay that discriminate based solely on the color of one's skin. If you are a Papua New Guinean with the same level of education and training, you will get paid 1/20th the salary of an expatriate simply because you are not white.

It is mind-blowingly stupid why we should let this injustice prevail in the 21st century. The only way I see now for a Papua New Guinean to get equal pay with other HUMAN BEINGS dammit - is if he or she emigrates and works abroad.

And I will go mad if I hear one of these idiots with ties in Waigani ask, "WHY THE BRAIN DRAIN?"
I hate to say it but we ARE famous for being very unproductive. In other words, we have the skills and training but we take buai breaks, we talk with other workers, we come in late, we leave early.

Should we be paid the same if our producitivy is lower than those who manage to get the work done?

Look at our government for zillions of beautiful examples of the low productivity of well educated and trained Papua New Guineans.

Well, what do you think?
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em
em

July 20th, 2011, 4:59 am #7

Where are the workers Unions? I think they are the people who are supposed to look at this and come up with some better ways of protecting nationals.
I know of cases were expats come in as consultants and end up occupying a full-time position.
Where are the workers unions? They're wherever the workers create them. Don't expect any kind hearted soul (especially the employer) to put a union in place. It always takes hard struggle on the part of workers to establish unions. No pain, no gain.
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Mangi Nating
Mangi Nating

July 20th, 2011, 9:06 am #8

I hate to say it but we ARE famous for being very unproductive. In other words, we have the skills and training but we take buai breaks, we talk with other workers, we come in late, we leave early.

Should we be paid the same if our producitivy is lower than those who manage to get the work done?

Look at our government for zillions of beautiful examples of the low productivity of well educated and trained Papua New Guineans.

Well, what do you think?
I couldn't help but chuckle when I read your remarks.

So typical.

Typical of so many Papua New Guineans who immediately rationalize the discrepancies as being our fault. Oh, it's because we take so many buai breaks and come in late and leave early. Bullsh1te. That isn't the reason and if you thought about it hard and long enough, you would know that that "argument" doesn't hold any water.

The reason there is a discrepancy is not due to productivity but race. These lies - which is really what these rationalizations amount to - are nothing but a very thin disguise through which the expatriate workforce has managed to maintain what is a very inequitable system. There is an anecdotal story of a worker in one of the provinces (he was from Milne Bay) who had an expatriate sounding name and was paid the "expatriate wage". As soon as they found out that that "cheeky darkie" was not white, they immediately reduced his wages to the national level. Productivity had absolutely nothing to do with it my friend. And it has nothing to do with the perpetuation of this injustice in Papua New Guinea (the land that time and the civil rights movement forgot).

I do not believe that this issue will be addressed in my working lifetime because too many Papua New Guineans believe that they are worth less than their expatriate co-workers and are ignorant of history - both our own and world history. Unfortunately what this means is that those Papua New Guineans who can will leave this country to work abroad and be paid the same as their "national" co-workers in Australia or New Zealand or wherever.


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j
j

July 22nd, 2011, 9:33 am #9

The current labour policy framework in PNG was adapted from Australia in the 1960. There is a huge gap with the expatriate and learned / educated PNG professionals.

Do you think it is about time PNG professional stood up and addressed this matter?
stop worrying about it go overseass. I left 7 years ago now very well paid, have a big office and drive co car 24/7. oh I'm taking a week off on golfing holiday in Central QLD coast. Get the picture!
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Overseas
Overseas

August 27th, 2011, 11:37 pm #10

I encourage you skilled PNGuineans to go overseas to work. I work overseas and have a company vehicle and I'm a senior staff in the company. I supervise white guys and looks funny sometimes when we are on a job site. People ask who the supervisor is and they point at me.

And to tell you the truth, this white guys are dumb as **** too.

So there you have it, being white doesn't mean they know it all.
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