Papua New Guinea’s Great War; Fighting for Opportunity

Papua New Guinea’s Great War; Fighting for Opportunity

Countryside
Countryside

August 20th, 2010, 12:06 am #1



We are on the verge of untold riches. Gas, rocks, fish and our blue chip companies are raking billions of kina every year. Our country will become an El Dorado where our cities will be perched with gold. Our landscape will have opulent mansions and the people will have wealth like never before. Highways will be built and cars from every make will traverse on them. Super malls will spring up and they will be our playgrounds. However, like the enchanted city, conquistadors will come from all corners of the earth to marvel at its spectacle and burn with lust to consume its riches. They will shower us with their way of life, fill our bank accounts with emeralds and pollinate their beliefs. In all, our way of life will change.

The question on everyones lips is the change for better or for worse. I dont know but what I do know is that change usually attracts conflicts and conflicts if not managed properly, may cascade into a cesspool of war and destruction. Anti Chinese sentiments in Ramu Nickel, Highlands, Manam, Sepik and Porebada conflicts among landowners are all signs of conflicts. Even conventional challenges such as crime are now moving into another realm, high flying executives, business tycoons and rogue Politians are now the new face of raskols. There is talk of the Yakusa, Triad and Mafia converging on our shores and taking a stake of our real estate. Papua New Guinea, the drums of war are reverberating in our homeland and they will no doubt threat our way of life.

You see war is consumptive, destructive and for those unfortunate souls that have witnessed it, they have scars that will remain in their memories for eternity. Carnage, the scent of putrification, destitution and loss, war is destructive. Although nations pledge to avoid wars, they have become an integral part of diplomacy, economics, politics and even development.

Like in ancient times, modern armies fight anything and anyone. From a foreign enemy, insurgent population to fundamentalists, governments have a powerful resource. Make no mistake, Papua New Guinea has this resource. The men and women of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force are trained killers. They have been schooled in the art of war. They have hid in pillboxes with future generals, flew in cockpits with top guns, sailed the seas with admirals and have been inside some of the most secured facilities in the world where warheads containing a payload that can sink the Papua New Guinea mainland.

They are trained to have unquestionable loyalty to the people of Papua New Guinea. So when our elected leaders tell them to jump out of a plane to kill an enemy, establish a forward base to bring relief supplies to our people who have been decimated by natural disasters, catch rouge vessels that steal our marine wealth, they do it without hesitation. Whether they perish in the swamps of Western Province, drown off Nukumanu or die in the cockpit somewhere in the Owen Stanley ranges, they live to protect the freedom we enjoy.

So we have the capacity to fight. Our boys and girls in uniform can adapt operational and tactical engagements but they still remain uncertain on one crucial intell, they dont know who our enemy is and neither do we. An astute student of war will probe the question, remove the chain of command and the entire infrastructure will collapse. From hunting in the caves of Afghanistan for Bin Laden to bombing Hitlers Eagle Nest, command control must be eliminated. So where is the command control in this case? Is it the Chinese, Sepiks, Highlanders, Porebadas, Manams, foreign governments, gangsters, raskols, businessmen, Politians??

No, the enemy is us. When we stand by and allow the fabric of our democracy dwindle because an old mans insatiable appetite for power, deny health and education services to the masses because its not in my personal interest, fund gangsters to protect crime syndicates, we are all guilty for war crimes.

But there is a resistance and it is led by the millions of Papua New Guineans who rise up every day and pray for the peace of PNG. As they travail in the presence of God for hope and change, a new generation is rising. From energetic human rights supporters, internationally acclaimed environmental advocates, God fearing CEOs, patriotic government officials, intellectual freaks, coffee growers, mariners, pilots, bankers, buai sellers, fisherman, they are rising to the call.

The battlefields are road blocks where a constable refuses a bribe and charges the driver for drink driving, board members vote against a unscrupulous deal, court rooms where prosecution of criminals are upheld, district treasuries where misappropriation is averted, primary schools where children joyfully recite there ABCs, aid posts where a mothers survives child birth.

There is nothing to fear PNG been an Ed Dorado, this is our inheritance, let us cross the river and take charge of it. Sure, the current of corruption will be string, the sharp rocks of death will spike our heals, piranhas of deceit will swarm us but its worth the fight because our people deserve a nation of opportunity, security and prosperity.
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Nesian
Nesian

August 25th, 2010, 5:44 am #2

Dude, I always find your pseudo-nationalistic hyperbole to be of an unpalatable style laced with less than coherent logic. I mean, what does "streets perched with gold" or "scent of purification" actually mean?

If you want to get rid of (the) Somare(s) because they are Sepiks with a dislike for Australia than just say so, don't try to cloak your simplistic ideas in malformed narratives, one can only infer that one is fool attempting to ensnare other fools in one's foolishness.

If an idea is logically sound it doesn't need to be wrapped in ideologies in order to be presented for analysis.
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Countryside
Countryside

August 25th, 2010, 10:09 pm #3

Dear Niesan,

I look forward to your comments because it is reflective of a growing persona of PNGns wanting hard analysis on the important issues of PNG. So while I acknowledge my commentaries are descriptive, they are intended to vividly draw the reader on developments in PNG. We must appropriately use different genres to communicate our message, I for one see this as an effective tool to get the message across. I do partake in this genre and if you are demanding for such a discussion, by all means, lets delve into them.

The post was inspired through the ability for PNG to consume the wealth that is currently growing in PNG. LNG, mining tenements and other resource, manufacturing and service sector growth is impacting many PNGns both in a positive and negative sence. There is disposable income to consume all sorts of investments. Its application and use will shape our nation. So the argument is this, how do we utilize wise use and at the moment, there is a tide of men and women making efforts to manage and use resources to benefit their people. Of course, the human mind is organic and I suspect in your case, requires some transplanting.

I must say, for someone that demands this, your current postings lack any substantive analysis. Provocative yes, chain discussions yes, but you yourself do lack any coherent analysis on your posts. Take for example your conscription post. Full of idiosyncrasies and incoherent chatter, a demonstration of a typical commentator that lacks substance. So you decide to trash others in the hope you can build a case that you have a cause. But this is it, we dont know it?. So you would probably respond with the hope and vein that more substantive analysis is required on my post and boastfully state how there should be a standard of sound discussion and all the while, you yourself lack this very standard.
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Joined: September 4th, 2002, 9:15 pm

August 26th, 2010, 7:37 am #4

Countryside!!! how does PNGScape conform to Nelsian's Standards?

To me your opening paragraph addressing scapers is a very strong warning to PNG nation not to be blinded ---- opps got to go will finish later, emergency.

7mile
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Hello?
Hello?

August 26th, 2010, 1:09 pm #5

Dear Niesan,

I look forward to your comments because it is reflective of a growing persona of PNGns wanting hard analysis on the important issues of PNG. So while I acknowledge my commentaries are descriptive, they are intended to vividly draw the reader on developments in PNG. We must appropriately use different genres to communicate our message, I for one see this as an effective tool to get the message across. I do partake in this genre and if you are demanding for such a discussion, by all means, lets delve into them.

The post was inspired through the ability for PNG to consume the wealth that is currently growing in PNG. LNG, mining tenements and other resource, manufacturing and service sector growth is impacting many PNGns both in a positive and negative sence. There is disposable income to consume all sorts of investments. Its application and use will shape our nation. So the argument is this, how do we utilize wise use and at the moment, there is a tide of men and women making efforts to manage and use resources to benefit their people. Of course, the human mind is organic and I suspect in your case, requires some transplanting.

I must say, for someone that demands this, your current postings lack any substantive analysis. Provocative yes, chain discussions yes, but you yourself do lack any coherent analysis on your posts. Take for example your conscription post. Full of idiosyncrasies and incoherent chatter, a demonstration of a typical commentator that lacks substance. So you decide to trash others in the hope you can build a case that you have a cause. But this is it, we dont know it?. So you would probably respond with the hope and vein that more substantive analysis is required on my post and boastfully state how there should be a standard of sound discussion and all the while, you yourself lack this very standard.
Countryside,

Even whilst fighting for opportunity, I would add...

We are still murdering and fighting each other off, big time over plain jealousy, ego, want, or supremacy plus some other factored motivations just like our forefathers of recent. Our forefathers had no western exposure but had always succeeded without any external influences brought on them through formal western education and church influence or other motivations.

Our forefathers had their pride and patriotism measured and dictated by big man type status or values. Bullish ways or victory over wars by tribal and enemy conflicts were their order. For competitive advantage amongst tribes, the accumulation of wealth was strengthened and determined by tribal advantage or tribal supremacy over a conquered tribe.

Perhaps we need to appreciate our anthropological heritage and cultural background plus the other factors of demography, where, why and how our forefathers migrated and ordered their lives, than shall we be able to understand the values they used to allow us to be where, how, why and who we are today.

It may be important to bragg about opportunities but how about our discussing priority shifts or emphasis by virtue of MTDS, MDG, Vision 2050 under the NA time lines as opposed to our current background?

Will stop here for the moment!


Hello?







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Countryside
Countryside

August 27th, 2010, 3:03 am #6

Hell o 7milebeach and Hello?

7milebeach, if I may start by saying that it is not PNGSCAPE moderators conforming to Nesians standard but insisting scapers to do so and I sincerely welcome the challenge. But like many of his gibberish scapes, at best, road signs, nothing of any coherent substance. But enough of this pubescent chatter, lets talk of the real stuff.

Hello? I couldnt agree more with your comments. Socials impact, cultural studies are just as important as environmental assessments. Although conducted for best industry practices, they indeed need to move into mandatory requirements when development plans and projects are formulated. These studies may indeed provide the basis for further consideration and direction to develop initiatives to assist our people in adjusting cultural, social and economic behavior.

Some of those reports are quite interesting in that vaulers have written how the loss of culture through development affects social behavior. Ranging from shifting of values and its impact on leadership, wealth and property. Whether conquistadors inspired or not, we are the only ones that will resolve these changes. It does help when people are looking beyond themselves to address these issues and it is these courageous PNGns we should support.
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Quite Frankly...
Quite Frankly...

August 27th, 2010, 1:35 pm #7

Countryside,

Ultimately your diatribes will be evaluated not as you think they should be evaluated but as the audience evaluates them. You may look upon some of the audience with disdain but frankly, there is a common thread I can see which strongly indicates that your postings are mostly ignored because they look like just so much pomp and pretense. Reading some of your postings, I can't help but wonder if you're Paulius Matane's hidden twin, or maybe got a transplant of some of his brain cells. He too has excelled over the years at pretentious and pompous essays to us, telling us how we should be behaving or what we should be examining in our future.

I would appreciate it a lot more if you led us through action. I don't mean the action of typing out another essay, but rather, some kind of action that you're actually doing to fight the corruption cancer of our nation. Instead of creating blogs, you've hitched a ride on some of them. Instead of finding innovative ways to attack the corrupt amongst us, you give us nebulous challenges to do it for ourselves.

I also wonder why, if you're such an enthusiastic columnist, why you don't have a regular column in The National or Post Courier? In the end, it seems that you only make a half effort in the directions you pursue. That is not inspirational.

While Nesian may be rude in his remarks to you, I can't help but agree more with him than with you.
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Hello?
Hello?

August 27th, 2010, 9:05 pm #8

To countryside,

I have left my email... if you drop into Port Moresby, let me know, you have something to offer this great land...

Thanks

Hello?
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Countryside
Countryside

August 27th, 2010, 10:56 pm #9

Countryside,

Ultimately your diatribes will be evaluated not as you think they should be evaluated but as the audience evaluates them. You may look upon some of the audience with disdain but frankly, there is a common thread I can see which strongly indicates that your postings are mostly ignored because they look like just so much pomp and pretense. Reading some of your postings, I can't help but wonder if you're Paulius Matane's hidden twin, or maybe got a transplant of some of his brain cells. He too has excelled over the years at pretentious and pompous essays to us, telling us how we should be behaving or what we should be examining in our future.

I would appreciate it a lot more if you led us through action. I don't mean the action of typing out another essay, but rather, some kind of action that you're actually doing to fight the corruption cancer of our nation. Instead of creating blogs, you've hitched a ride on some of them. Instead of finding innovative ways to attack the corrupt amongst us, you give us nebulous challenges to do it for ourselves.

I also wonder why, if you're such an enthusiastic columnist, why you don't have a regular column in The National or Post Courier? In the end, it seems that you only make a half effort in the directions you pursue. That is not inspirational.

While Nesian may be rude in his remarks to you, I can't help but agree more with him than with you.
Dear Wantok,
Opinions, comments and criticism are welcome as they are indicators to improve defficneices exissitng in ones character. As mentioned, Im delighted that there is an active community of PNGns are wanting to probe discussions that need to be debated. Its also exciting to see the exchanges of views from fundamentalists, reformists, revolutionists and outright radicalists. Itll be interesting however, how many readers work in government. I say this because as one myself, I gain an interesting view from the people I serve, responding actively to the decisions I advise on. With the internet penetrating all parts of country and therefore information is becoming readily accessible to our people, these are effective tools to communicate to our people.

The public service is no doubt a challenging place both in terms of remuneration and delivery. My officers are faced daily with the unfortunate reality to choose which clubs to join. They are in all cases corrupt, short term and end up tainting their skills. So as a person that sees this daily, I can only pray and inspire them. We are changing mindsets, fueling options and giving them hope that our country has much to offer. So I write these essays in the hope that irrespective of the great challenges we have, we must inspire to continue finding ways to fight them. For some of us, this is the only way to fight corruption.

Yes, my peicies have a Matane like notions and I acknowledge it is not for the hardy intelligentsia that demands hard core debates on the tough issues. And again, I am delighted to see that this is what PNGns are demanding. I will indeed take your comments onboard in my future works.
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Stret Toka
Stret Toka

August 30th, 2010, 9:08 pm #10

Countriside....have you ever thought of being a whistle blower??? Maybe using this forum and places like Wikileaks to bring attention to the plight of the PNG Public service. Just a thought!

Stret Toka
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