How can we solve our problems?

How can we solve our problems?

M Saweri
M Saweri

January 25th, 2012, 3:36 pm #1

A year ago i posted the question, how can we improve our country. There were good arguments that have circulated throughout the threads but what i have read makes me more skeptical and quite disconsolate at our future. Many of the people posting wrote, this is too hard and too expensive, they argued that our terrain is too rugged and we spend too much money on imports etc, it saddens me that we think things are too hard. The US grew remarkably because there was not the attitude of 'it's-too-hard-leave-it-alone' but the 'how-can-i-make-it-better", PNG people lack the can-do attitude that makes other countries so successful, i have an idea of how we can get PNG on track in the next 10 - 20 years, but how am i going to get it implimented? The answer seems obvious, stand for a membership into the house of assembly. Although i stand a very poor chance at the moment. Our ideas and our solutions need to be put to a member of parliament who is a can-do man/woman, not a paper-pusher.

I've learnt in practical medicine, when something needs to be done but you don't have the right equipment you have to improvise.

Our terrain is difficult and dangerous, the landslide at Komo (24/01/12) proved this, but we have people who thrive on problem solving, who have lived with such a huge poverty gap that kid's know how to build their own toys, PMV drivers know how to patch up the PMV whatever the problem. Sometimes our solutions are not elegant or even practical but often they work due to the vigil we keep as our own bread and butter is riding on it.

Our elite are very conscious of the services that are around them, but i know a lot of Drs want to serve the populations outside POM and other major centres. But many don't want to get stuck where there is no good school for their children. So a good int'l school is built and all of a sudden the Dr comes, businesses see this opportunity and follow. We need to provide the impetus that allows this migration.

So how can we solve the problems we face in this our homeland?
Quote
Share

Memkit
Memkit

January 26th, 2012, 5:18 am #2

That is a very profound observation. It reveals one of the reason why we are not progressing as a country. We generally have a docile and pessimistic attitude to development issues.

The geography of our country is such that building infrastructure and providing service for our people is difficult to say the least.

But we have no room to be pessimistic because we have no other option. If we say it cant be done then we will continue to wallow in poverty, high maternal mortality and illiteracy rate and most of PNG will remain inaccessible.

We have to do something. We have to start somewhere even if we do not have the ideal material. Make do is better than nothing.

Quote
Share

yes we do
yes we do

January 27th, 2012, 12:44 am #3

No we don't have to do anything. Goodness knows we haven't done anything up to now. We can continue as before, indefinitely. We've already become much much poorer per person than we were at independence (in terms of overall wealth, not just money wealth). Why wouldn't we let this continue until we have nothing?

I certainly see that as an option (ie do nothing) because thats the option we've been following all along.
Quote
Share

Mangi Nating
Mangi Nating

January 30th, 2012, 9:28 am #4

A year ago i posted the question, how can we improve our country. There were good arguments that have circulated throughout the threads but what i have read makes me more skeptical and quite disconsolate at our future. Many of the people posting wrote, this is too hard and too expensive, they argued that our terrain is too rugged and we spend too much money on imports etc, it saddens me that we think things are too hard. The US grew remarkably because there was not the attitude of 'it's-too-hard-leave-it-alone' but the 'how-can-i-make-it-better", PNG people lack the can-do attitude that makes other countries so successful, i have an idea of how we can get PNG on track in the next 10 - 20 years, but how am i going to get it implimented? The answer seems obvious, stand for a membership into the house of assembly. Although i stand a very poor chance at the moment. Our ideas and our solutions need to be put to a member of parliament who is a can-do man/woman, not a paper-pusher.

I've learnt in practical medicine, when something needs to be done but you don't have the right equipment you have to improvise.

Our terrain is difficult and dangerous, the landslide at Komo (24/01/12) proved this, but we have people who thrive on problem solving, who have lived with such a huge poverty gap that kid's know how to build their own toys, PMV drivers know how to patch up the PMV whatever the problem. Sometimes our solutions are not elegant or even practical but often they work due to the vigil we keep as our own bread and butter is riding on it.

Our elite are very conscious of the services that are around them, but i know a lot of Drs want to serve the populations outside POM and other major centres. But many don't want to get stuck where there is no good school for their children. So a good int'l school is built and all of a sudden the Dr comes, businesses see this opportunity and follow. We need to provide the impetus that allows this migration.

So how can we solve the problems we face in this our homeland?
Hi Saweri,

I'd be very interested in reading your ideas about development.

Quote
Share

M Saweri
M Saweri

January 30th, 2012, 11:05 am #5

It's all in my previous post under, My Plan. Of course its just a crude, rough sketch but that's how i operate, have a general goal but be flexible so when encountering problems solutions permeate easily.
Quote
Share

requiem
requiem

January 30th, 2012, 11:26 am #6

A year ago i posted the question, how can we improve our country. There were good arguments that have circulated throughout the threads but what i have read makes me more skeptical and quite disconsolate at our future. Many of the people posting wrote, this is too hard and too expensive, they argued that our terrain is too rugged and we spend too much money on imports etc, it saddens me that we think things are too hard. The US grew remarkably because there was not the attitude of 'it's-too-hard-leave-it-alone' but the 'how-can-i-make-it-better", PNG people lack the can-do attitude that makes other countries so successful, i have an idea of how we can get PNG on track in the next 10 - 20 years, but how am i going to get it implimented? The answer seems obvious, stand for a membership into the house of assembly. Although i stand a very poor chance at the moment. Our ideas and our solutions need to be put to a member of parliament who is a can-do man/woman, not a paper-pusher.

I've learnt in practical medicine, when something needs to be done but you don't have the right equipment you have to improvise.

Our terrain is difficult and dangerous, the landslide at Komo (24/01/12) proved this, but we have people who thrive on problem solving, who have lived with such a huge poverty gap that kid's know how to build their own toys, PMV drivers know how to patch up the PMV whatever the problem. Sometimes our solutions are not elegant or even practical but often they work due to the vigil we keep as our own bread and butter is riding on it.

Our elite are very conscious of the services that are around them, but i know a lot of Drs want to serve the populations outside POM and other major centres. But many don't want to get stuck where there is no good school for their children. So a good int'l school is built and all of a sudden the Dr comes, businesses see this opportunity and follow. We need to provide the impetus that allows this migration.

So how can we solve the problems we face in this our homeland?
Of course, people who face greater problems can work much harder to develop solutions that people who don't have those problems don't have to worry about. Our terrain is exceptionally bad, one of the worst in the world, in terms of cost-effective infrastructure. The only way to build infrastructure is to spend huge amounts of money. Most countries in our state of development simply don't have that amount of money to spend on infrastructure, and even in Europe, even today they'd never build a highway through the Alps mountains in areas that were as rugged as much of our country.

So the solution IS more money, and we are fortunate to have the natural resources that it might be possible to earn that money but NOT as long as we ship out raw resources at cheap prices (as opposed to getting the value added from downstream processing) and we mis-use and overharvest our renewable resources so that they are depleted. We also have to learn to live within our means. We will never grow enough rice to support the country (it takes too much work) and we cannot afford the horrendous imported rice bill that we now pay. The obvious solution is to go back to homegrown PNG foods and stop taking the easy way out that comes from quick cook rice. But aren't we too lazy to make any of those sacrifices? Or is the problem that our leaders don't challenge us to sacrifice the way leaders have stimulated their people to move forward in other countries?
Quote
Share

M Saweri
M Saweri

January 30th, 2012, 3:06 pm #7

Actually, they built roads through the alps, in the early 1900's, and they are still in use today. They also built the highest rail line in china, the dutch built great dykes to hold back the sea so that almost 20% of their land is below sea level. The world has many great marvels that were built with ingenuity and hard work, they take years to accomplish and much money, yet they can be done, so long as people want them. The Sydney Harbour Bridge took 8 years to build, and many thousands of people come every year to stare at it. What if we had a great bridges and passes, roads and links that both allowed tourists access to the remote areas of PNG culture and allowed the remote areas have access to medical supplies etc?
Quote
Share

AAA
AAA

January 30th, 2012, 9:10 pm #8

They built very limited roads thru the alps and pretty much avoided the very rugged terrain when they designed where the roads would be put. If there had been communities scattered all thru the alps like there are in PNG no way in hell would each of those communities have ever gotten a road the way communities in PNG expect.
Quote
Share

Ralph Hamilton
Ralph Hamilton

January 31st, 2012, 12:08 am #9

You must be joking,
plenty of countries have mountains like PNG, if not higher.

The only thing unique about PNg is that someone want "Compensation" for every inch of road (or Whatever) Built. This is what is unique, and also stops many projects form getting off the ground. To say PNG does not have the wealth to do this, is also laughable. It has. Just the money goes elsewhere.

If the people have the will, it will be done. However, I don't think the majority have the will. They may complain, but they prever their isolated villages. That way they can ignore the outside world. Be warned - the world is there and will not go away. Ignore it at your peril. King Canute failed in trying to turn the tide back, too.

Insularity is death......Ralph.
Quote
Share

Definitely a joke!!!!!
Definitely a joke!!!!!

January 31st, 2012, 12:25 am #10

I think the joke actualy concerns aussies who promise to look into things for papua new guineans who beg him for help, after which he 'disappears' for awhile, after which he reports to the 'boss' about what is going on while ignoring those who asked the aussie in the first place to investigate. What a joke that fellow is cuz he says one thing, then does another. Like a hypocrit at worst, dishonest at best......................................but he'll always come back armed with an excuse or a putdown just to show us....................
Quote
Share