Difference between Papua New Guineans and Burmese people

Difference between Papua New Guineans and Burmese people

why?
why?

September 23rd, 2007, 12:58 pm #1

Burmese people: activists amongst them
Papua New Guineans: activists so few and far between, seem absent.

Burmese people: willing to risk being tortured or even their lives to protest against their government.
Papua New Guineans: Not even willing to risk lunch hour to protest.

Burmese religious people: taking a stand against injustice against humans.
Papua New Guinean religious people: silent always.

Burmese people: Will win their fight against a corrupt government.
Papua New Guineans: Not only content to let a corrupt government boss them, many voted for known corrupt pollies to give them another chance to steal!

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The Age Australia
September 23, 2007

POLICE have let about 500 protesting Buddhist monks through a roadblock to march past the house in which opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is detained.

Witnesses said the Nobel Peace Prize laureate came to her gate to greet them.

Thousands more monks and other citizens also marched on Friday in other cities in the tightly controlled military-ruled country.

The part of University Avenue, where Ms Suu Kyi's house is located, has been closed to traffic since September 17.

The monks stopped briefly in front of Ms Suu Kyi's house and said some prayers before leaving at the other end of the road, said a resident.

The road was closed again after the monks passed. Ms Suu Kyi has been in detention for more than 11 of the past 18 years.

In the central Burma city of Mandalay, a crowd of 10,000 people, including at least 4000 Buddhist monks, marched in one of the largest demonstrations against the country's strict military regime since a 1988 democracy uprising, witnesses said. At the same time, about 1000 monks, led by one holding his begging bowl upturned as a sign of protest, marched towards the centre of Rangoon from the Shwedagon Pagoda, Burma's most revered shrine, and a historic centre for protest movements.

It was the fifth straight day the monks have marched in Rangoon, and the numbers indicated that the anti-government protests were growing.

Emboldened by the monks, about 800 other people walked along with them in the drizzling rain through the heart of Rangoon's commercial district.

The monks' activities have given new life to a protest movement that began a month ago after the Government raised fuel prices, triggering demonstrations against policies that are causing economic hardship. Meanwhile, a monks' organisation for the first time urged the public to join in protesting "evil military despotism" in Burma, also known as Myanmar. A day earlier, about 1500 barefoot Buddhist monks marched more than 16 kilometres through Rangoon's flooded streets, sometimes in knee-deep water in a raging tropical downpour.

More than 1000 sympathisers marched with them.

At one point, a young man in white T-shirt and shorts flung himself to the ground, showing his devotion and gratitude by touching his forehead to one monk's feet in a Buddhist gesture of reverence.

There were several other protests on Friday, including one by 500 monks and residents in Mogok, 670 kilometres north of Rangoon. Mogok is famous for its rubies, and most of the protesters were gem mine workers. The protest movement began on August 19 after the Government raised fuel prices, but has its basis in long pent-up dissatisfaction with the repressive military regime.

Using arrests and intimidation, the Government had managed to keep demonstrations limited in size and impact, but they gained new life when the monks joined.

The Government has been handling the situation gingerly, aware that forcibly breaking up the monks' protest in predominantly Buddhist Burma would likely cause public outrage.

AP

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Ralph Hamilton
Ralph Hamilton

September 23rd, 2007, 9:45 pm #2

I have an answer,
it could be like the difference between Burmese Cats and Persian Cats.

It is the type of fur you have.

Regards......Ralph.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 24th, 2007, 1:11 am #3

Rait man Ralph...yu putim stret.

You made me laugh....thanks for making my day with that joke
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naive
naive

September 24th, 2007, 11:22 am #4

@Ralph
It reminds me of this old book I once read. This guy was dating two identical twins....and sometimes gets confused on who is who. Anyway, the only way he could tell them apart is when he is in "BED" with either of them.

...its so amazing the difference that can be found there!!

naive
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 24th, 2007, 12:05 pm #5

Burmese people: activists amongst them
Papua New Guineans: activists so few and far between, seem absent.

Burmese people: willing to risk being tortured or even their lives to protest against their government.
Papua New Guineans: Not even willing to risk lunch hour to protest.

Burmese religious people: taking a stand against injustice against humans.
Papua New Guinean religious people: silent always.

Burmese people: Will win their fight against a corrupt government.
Papua New Guineans: Not only content to let a corrupt government boss them, many voted for known corrupt pollies to give them another chance to steal!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Age Australia
September 23, 2007

POLICE have let about 500 protesting Buddhist monks through a roadblock to march past the house in which opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi is detained.

Witnesses said the Nobel Peace Prize laureate came to her gate to greet them.

Thousands more monks and other citizens also marched on Friday in other cities in the tightly controlled military-ruled country.

The part of University Avenue, where Ms Suu Kyi's house is located, has been closed to traffic since September 17.

The monks stopped briefly in front of Ms Suu Kyi's house and said some prayers before leaving at the other end of the road, said a resident.

The road was closed again after the monks passed. Ms Suu Kyi has been in detention for more than 11 of the past 18 years.

In the central Burma city of Mandalay, a crowd of 10,000 people, including at least 4000 Buddhist monks, marched in one of the largest demonstrations against the country's strict military regime since a 1988 democracy uprising, witnesses said. At the same time, about 1000 monks, led by one holding his begging bowl upturned as a sign of protest, marched towards the centre of Rangoon from the Shwedagon Pagoda, Burma's most revered shrine, and a historic centre for protest movements.

It was the fifth straight day the monks have marched in Rangoon, and the numbers indicated that the anti-government protests were growing.

Emboldened by the monks, about 800 other people walked along with them in the drizzling rain through the heart of Rangoon's commercial district.

The monks' activities have given new life to a protest movement that began a month ago after the Government raised fuel prices, triggering demonstrations against policies that are causing economic hardship. Meanwhile, a monks' organisation for the first time urged the public to join in protesting "evil military despotism" in Burma, also known as Myanmar. A day earlier, about 1500 barefoot Buddhist monks marched more than 16 kilometres through Rangoon's flooded streets, sometimes in knee-deep water in a raging tropical downpour.

More than 1000 sympathisers marched with them.

At one point, a young man in white T-shirt and shorts flung himself to the ground, showing his devotion and gratitude by touching his forehead to one monk's feet in a Buddhist gesture of reverence.

There were several other protests on Friday, including one by 500 monks and residents in Mogok, 670 kilometres north of Rangoon. Mogok is famous for its rubies, and most of the protesters were gem mine workers. The protest movement began on August 19 after the Government raised fuel prices, but has its basis in long pent-up dissatisfaction with the repressive military regime.

Using arrests and intimidation, the Government had managed to keep demonstrations limited in size and impact, but they gained new life when the monks joined.

The Government has been handling the situation gingerly, aware that forcibly breaking up the monks' protest in predominantly Buddhist Burma would likely cause public outrage.

AP
The difference is that we are born in our genes with being lazy and doing nothing with our lives. Even our educated poeple quickly show by their conduct in the offices that they're lazy and don't work hard they want to sit at an office all day in air con. Now that's REALLY lazy and its coming right from our educateds.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 25th, 2007, 3:06 am #6

Which Bible said, Education breeds hard-working people? You fool!

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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 25th, 2007, 7:56 am #7

In Burma, the Buddhism faith says "harming of monks is the greatest sin" so the government will never harm them.

Where as in PNG, nobdy gives a sht about anybody. Even police don't care who stands on their way; just blow the hell out of them.

Can you see the difference?
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fed up
fed up

September 26th, 2007, 8:30 am #8

difference is we **** on our harse whilst others think and act for their rights reardless of bullets or whatever.

fed up of the status quo!!
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 26th, 2007, 11:23 pm #9


The difference is PNGans are cowards....
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lazy boi
lazy boi

September 27th, 2007, 4:05 am #10

In Burma, the Buddhism faith says "harming of monks is the greatest sin" so the government will never harm them.

Where as in PNG, nobdy gives a sht about anybody. Even police don't care who stands on their way; just blow the hell out of them.

Can you see the difference?
No, you're wrong, maybe they're not supposed to be beating up monks but that is happening at this very moment and the monks keep demonstrating. See the article below. Which shows once again, that we Papua New Guineans have none of the bravery of these monks and none of the bravery even our ancestors had. Instead we have become frightened of authority, even corrupt people we are frightened of.

This following article has incredible pictures of what is happening, check them out:
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/arti ... article.do


www.thisislondon.com
London, Thursday 27.09.07
Burma: Protesting monks are beaten by security forces
26.09.07

• UK and international community call for 'restraint' by the junta • Desmond Tutu likens the protest to anti-apartheid movement • Military finally appears on the streets of Yangon

Burma's protesting monks have been been baton-charged and sprayed with tear gas after they defied the military's ban on demonstrations.

More than 10 monks were beaten by the country's security forces and over 200 are said to have been arrested in Rangoon.

Earlier, soldiers and armed police patrolled monasteries and other flashpoints as a night-time curfew ended and morning began.

Burma's military leaders imposed the curfew and banned gatherings of people after 35,000 Buddhist monks and their supporters defied warnings and staged another day of anti-government protests yesterday.

Witnesses said many of the monks had been wearing surgical masks as a precaution against teargas attacks.

Armed riot police and soldiers poured into the Burmese city of Rangoon early today amid fears that eight days of peaceful protests led by the monks will end in bloodshed.

Signs that dictator General Than Shwe was preparing to defy worldwide opinion and crush the protesters emerged late last night as the military government banned all assemblies and issued a curfew.

Soldiers drove through the streets with loudspeakers announcing a ban on meetings of more than five people and a 9pm to 5am curfew.

With the first beatings of the monks, the scene was set for what many fear could be a massacre of pro-democracy campaigners. Tens of thousands have joined the monks in the past few days.

Last night security forces had surrounded Rangoon's Sule Pagoda, the focus of the mass protests, and appeared to be ready to seal off the area, witnesses said.

Detained democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who appeared outside her house at the weekend, is said to have been moved to the notorious Insein prison.

Yesterday the international community urged the government not to repeat the bloody crackdown of 1988, in which 3,000 pro-democracy protesters died.

George Bush condemned the military rulers for imposing a "a 19-year reign of fear" and the UN human rights investigator for Burma said he feared "very severe repression".

"It is an emergency," Paulo Sergio Pinheiro said.

The notorious 22nd army division, which took part in the 1988 bloodshed, was among units heading to Rangoon yesterday after leaders of the hardline junta, which has ruled Burma for 45 years, held an emergency "war cabinet".

As darkness fell over the city, eight truckloads of riot police, carrying shields, batons and rifles, moved in to the city centre while five military trucks packed with soldiers arrived in a downtown area.

The Burma Campaign UK said its sources had reported the junta placing an order for 3,000 maroon monastic robes and telling soldiers to shave their heads. It is thought the soldiers could be ordered to infiltrate the monks.

The pro-democracy protests have spread to 25 cities and towns across Burma.

Foreign Secretary David Miliband joined those urging restraint and added that Aung San Suu Kyi should be allowed to take her place as elected leader.

President Bush announced new U.S. sanctions against Burma's military rulers during his annual address at the United Nations.

Yesterday, tens of thousands of orange and red-robed monks ignored the warnings and threats of the junta to lead more protests across the country.

In Taunggok, a coastal city 250 miles north-west of Rangoon, up to 40,000 monks and civilians took to the streets.

One monk said: "The protest is not merely for the wellbeing of people, but also for monks struggling for democracy and for people to have an opportunity to determine their own future."


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