Brain Drain Incentive?

Brain Drain Incentive?

under skilled
under skilled

March 15th, 2007, 10:09 am #1

Here is a thought;

Australia is having a major skilled shortage in the, construction and engineering Trades among others (esp. TAFE apprenticeships).

In June 2006 the AUSAID white paper was released - one of the main areas proudly highlighted in the brisbane public session Brisbane was the intention of raising the standard qualifications of tertiary institutions in PNG to Australian standards. This was just after proudly using a PNG nurse who came on an Ausaid scholarship who was now working in Canberra Royal Hospital as a successful example of an Ausaid scholarship.

The evening was preluded by stating that a certain high percentage of people in developing countries live on less than a dollar a day. The question was asked during the evening why there was no allocation of funding to raising the standard of vocational training in addition to tertiary institutions. (Perhaps so vocational skills may be passed on to a village level for people to help them selves?) The answer given was that Australia is facing the same issue at the vocational level ... well the answer was pretty much sidestepped.

One of the main proposed solutions to solving the skill shortage in Australia is skilled migration. This has been tried in the past with limited success, as migrants who were given the incentive to migrate (in 1990's)often found themselves unable to be employed as often employers veiwed the quality of thier qualifications with suspicion or didn't recognise them at all or just not accomodating to cultural and language differences.

So the question is posed --- Is AUSAID raising the international recognition and standing of PNG tertiary institution over other educational needs in PNG to help PNG (and assists the people who live on less than a dollar a day in developing nations through AusAid incentives) - or to Poach its bright minds -- i.e. brain drain. Is this another example of Boomerang Aid??

Further there is a need for a lot of unskilled of semi-skilled workers in Australia - PNG has the potential to fill that neiche (Papua New Guineans are known to be hard workers) through perhaps conditional or short term visas - e.g. during seasonal fruit picking periods.... why is that not happening currently?


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I know
I know

March 15th, 2007, 2:34 pm #2

I hate to tell you but there are very few PNG bright minds in PNG institutions. Most of them escape to overseas. Those going to the PNG unis rarely come from intl school curriculum so their whole education bckgrnd is substandard.
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Fynn
Fynn

March 17th, 2007, 2:44 am #3

Narrow minded comment from a narrow minded tw*t! Papua New Guineans go overseas because they can or the opportunity presents itself. Just means the ones left didn't have the opportunity or CHOSE not to go.
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underskilled
underskilled

March 18th, 2007, 3:01 am #4

I dont disagree - people leave for their own reasons. In Australia opportunities that present themselves that are not easily available in PNG - i.e. $ $ $ bills and the opportunity to apply western learnt concepts (that meet Aussie standards) in more developed western context. People who also choose to go... probably also have the money to go (pay that hefty Airline ticket, and meet immigration minimum bank account requirements)... It is funny how money seems to present opportunties; and tertiary education will often give you the skill base to required to meet the requirements of higher income jobs so that you may earn that money. Scholarships also provide a similar opportunty, but I suppose by upgrading PNG tertiary standards, money does not need to be spent on living allowances and travel for students - further, people are educated in PNG do not get a taste for western freedom.

The issue that is trying to be highlighted I think through the thread I think is that ol save ppl. who would otherwise contribute through ideas, innovation and bringing a perhaps bit more educated perspective to development issues in PNG go overseas - where their qualifications are recognised and their skills are in demand and financial (and non-financial e.g. quality of life) incentives exist to reward the migration.

So the question remains - is the AUSAID direction misguided - are there better education priorities - such as raising basic numeracy and literacy at a primary or tertiary level to give all Papua New Guienans equal opportunties rather than just those with money?? Are AUSAID dollars AIDing in the development of PNG, and helping those people that live on less than a dollar a day, or helping to meet public community services and basic human needs that government has not been successful in and private institutions do not have the capacity to do so?
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wantok
wantok

March 19th, 2007, 11:12 pm #5


Wantoks and fellow countrymen,
We left png not because we wanted to the situation actually pushed us out.
Quiet a number of us pngeans have made New Zealand our home and enjoying the fruits of what your ability can make you become.

Get out of png and see the difference.

Wantok
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Under skilled
Under skilled

March 22nd, 2007, 9:37 am #6

I dont disagree - people leave for their own reasons. In Australia opportunities that present themselves that are not easily available in PNG - i.e. $ $ $ bills and the opportunity to apply western learnt concepts (that meet Aussie standards) in more developed western context. People who also choose to go... probably also have the money to go (pay that hefty Airline ticket, and meet immigration minimum bank account requirements)... It is funny how money seems to present opportunties; and tertiary education will often give you the skill base to required to meet the requirements of higher income jobs so that you may earn that money. Scholarships also provide a similar opportunty, but I suppose by upgrading PNG tertiary standards, money does not need to be spent on living allowances and travel for students - further, people are educated in PNG do not get a taste for western freedom.

The issue that is trying to be highlighted I think through the thread I think is that ol save ppl. who would otherwise contribute through ideas, innovation and bringing a perhaps bit more educated perspective to development issues in PNG go overseas - where their qualifications are recognised and their skills are in demand and financial (and non-financial e.g. quality of life) incentives exist to reward the migration.

So the question remains - is the AUSAID direction misguided - are there better education priorities - such as raising basic numeracy and literacy at a primary or tertiary level to give all Papua New Guienans equal opportunties rather than just those with money?? Are AUSAID dollars AIDing in the development of PNG, and helping those people that live on less than a dollar a day, or helping to meet public community services and basic human needs that government has not been successful in and private institutions do not have the capacity to do so?
I note in the Post Courier this morning,

This article entitled:
"Seasonal labour eyed"
http://www.postcourier.com.pg/20070322/thhome.htm



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another wantok
another wantok

March 22nd, 2007, 11:53 am #7

Here is a thought;

Australia is having a major skilled shortage in the, construction and engineering Trades among others (esp. TAFE apprenticeships).

In June 2006 the AUSAID white paper was released - one of the main areas proudly highlighted in the brisbane public session Brisbane was the intention of raising the standard qualifications of tertiary institutions in PNG to Australian standards. This was just after proudly using a PNG nurse who came on an Ausaid scholarship who was now working in Canberra Royal Hospital as a successful example of an Ausaid scholarship.

The evening was preluded by stating that a certain high percentage of people in developing countries live on less than a dollar a day. The question was asked during the evening why there was no allocation of funding to raising the standard of vocational training in addition to tertiary institutions. (Perhaps so vocational skills may be passed on to a village level for people to help them selves?) The answer given was that Australia is facing the same issue at the vocational level ... well the answer was pretty much sidestepped.

One of the main proposed solutions to solving the skill shortage in Australia is skilled migration. This has been tried in the past with limited success, as migrants who were given the incentive to migrate (in 1990's)often found themselves unable to be employed as often employers veiwed the quality of thier qualifications with suspicion or didn't recognise them at all or just not accomodating to cultural and language differences.

So the question is posed --- Is AUSAID raising the international recognition and standing of PNG tertiary institution over other educational needs in PNG to help PNG (and assists the people who live on less than a dollar a day in developing nations through AusAid incentives) - or to Poach its bright minds -- i.e. brain drain. Is this another example of Boomerang Aid??

Further there is a need for a lot of unskilled of semi-skilled workers in Australia - PNG has the potential to fill that neiche (Papua New Guineans are known to be hard workers) through perhaps conditional or short term visas - e.g. during seasonal fruit picking periods.... why is that not happening currently?

There are a lot of us here in Aussie who are professionals, brought up in the villages, went to same primary schools, and went to same universities. I tell you, I am surely giving orders to people who have equal qualifications, Australians, Russians, USA, English, Scotish, Indian etc. For me people see me and not as the person from where I come from and how good my English is. Am an average Aussie speaker. We are surely sending thousands of Aussie dollars home, but lots also become stupid because there is readily available pokies and brothels.

Be encouraged. have faith. Australia need tradespeople and you could earn in 1 year what you would earn in 10 years.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

March 22nd, 2007, 5:49 pm #8

No doubt about it no matter how much you help by sending Aussie dollars home, you'd help even more by transferring skills, information and experience to other Papua New Guineans by living in PNG.
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K-RECS
K-RECS

March 23rd, 2007, 12:14 pm #9

Dollars is not always the primary motivation!.

My brother and I have studied and fortunative enought to work in Australia with the hope goal of attaining the skills, experience and knowldge but most importantly integrity that someday we can apply what we've gained back home.

I have reservations that down the line, I may perhaps pass this on to fellow PNGeans and do my part for my country.

Anyway...GOOD LUCK WITH IT.


S.Elias [Solutions Architect - Knowledge - Records Enterprise Content Solutions]
E: sean.elias@krecs.com.au
W: www.krecs.com.au

"Our strength is our ability to harness disparate technologies and make them ‘one’. We do this by providing simple solutions to further improve the effective capture, management and delivery of content across the enterprise. "




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AB
AB

March 23rd, 2007, 9:42 pm #10

Here in PNG we find many lazy PNGans who are quick to label hard-working PNGans overseas as traitors.

You know, as far as I am concerned this is one of the many reasons our country is so backward. Instead of cheering the success of other PNGans and wishing them well in their chosen proffessions either here or off-shore we are very quick to brand them as traitors. This is also one of the reasons why 6,000 chinese are coming in to work at Ramu Nickel and also why most of the businesses in PNG are owned by Asians. It is because we are so small minded as a people that we would rather support Asians than our own people!

Anonymous, I want to know, apart from draining this country's very limited services, what if anything, have you contributed to PNG?

I have met many great PNGans working in Australia. Most of them are told by their wantoks to return home and help them, etc, etc. My advice to PNGans in Australia is to stay there. Make your money and support your family here, come home on holidays but under no circumstances should you throw away your job and come back here. Ifyou return now, you would only be making a bad situation worse.

The facts in PNG are that there are 40,000 young PNGans leaving school every year and less than 500 new jobs are created per annum. Over the next 30 years there is no likelyhood of substantial new jobs being created in PNG, this is a very sad but undeniable fact. None of us ordinary citizens can change this damning statistic, only the exclusive little club of parliamentarians and their brief case carriers in Waigani.

The only way ordinary citizens can help this country is by leaving and working overseas, reducing the burden on hardly coping services in PNG and hopefully, sending money home to the relatives.

I have hundreds of former workmates from Ok Tedi working in Australia and I have personally encouraged many of them to go simply because I know that if they stay here, they are locking up jobs that other PNGans can have.

For years I was in the union movement fighting against the wage disparity between PNGans and Expats. Well today, I am proud to say that many of my friends and colleagues are now earning the salaries they (we) could never get here.

Imagine an Engineer here in PNG being paid K36,000 per annum and trying to support their entire extended family including the wife's side. Well today that same Engineer is on a minimum of A$120,000 or K250,000 per year!

Now to me, that is a bloody excellent outcome! I say good on all of you who are down there making the money, noken harim tok bilong ol jealous lain long hia husait igat liklik brain.
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