Are there PNG IT skilled people overseas??

Are there PNG IT skilled people overseas??

Under Dog
Under Dog

June 4th, 2007, 1:59 am #1

Hello ALL,

Just want to know if there are any png IT skilled people working overseas. I heard of Engineers and other professionals but am not sure about our IT graduates. It will surely be encouraging if we have people working overseas. Dont want to change course to an engineering field but want to know if i may have a chance to work overseas in the future...

istap wantaim yupela
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bex
bex

June 4th, 2007, 4:15 am #2

Am a engineering student here in QUT but haven't come across any IT professionals. I would advise you to change to engineering cos you'll probably have a higher chance of working down here then in IT
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 4th, 2007, 7:11 am #3

Hello ALL,

Just want to know if there are any png IT skilled people working overseas. I heard of Engineers and other professionals but am not sure about our IT graduates. It will surely be encouraging if we have people working overseas. Dont want to change course to an engineering field but want to know if i may have a chance to work overseas in the future...

istap wantaim yupela
You are a traitor
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Freddie
Freddie

June 4th, 2007, 5:10 pm #4

Hello ALL,

Just want to know if there are any png IT skilled people working overseas. I heard of Engineers and other professionals but am not sure about our IT graduates. It will surely be encouraging if we have people working overseas. Dont want to change course to an engineering field but want to know if i may have a chance to work overseas in the future...

istap wantaim yupela
I am a local graduate from Unitech with a Bach.Science.Computer Science, '99. I have pursued further studies and have also undergone professional certification training after graduation from Unitech, and being in the work scene.

I have worked as a professional web developer for the last 4 years (..up to present day) away from home (PNG). All in the San Diego region in Southern California (USA). I now work as a Web Application Development Consultant with Modern Solution. i.e. http://www.modernsolution.com . Modern Solution's primary responsibility and focus is on California's ever changing BioMedical Industry, and how we try to help surgeons and medical professionals market their new medical discoveries or their professional expertize. We are now heavily focused on Lasik Surgery (vision improvement) and Dentistry.

I can assure you I have made it, and anyone in PNG can make it. I live a happy and wonderful life, with a good paying job coupled with great benefits.

I know of one of my other colleagues who graduated a year behind me and we both worked together in the same company back in PNG. He now works for a mining giant in Australia, as one of their primary software developer/analyst. I hesitate to leave his name (particulars) here. There is one other guy who worked for Lihir a while back (wanpla senior ya..), who ended up finding himself a better dream-come-true job in London, as one of their MIMS (Mincom Information Management Systems) Programmer Analyst. I only heard of him and met him once, when I was back in PNG then....

There are a few perhaps the only 3 of us, or more (some others I am not aware of), that I list here. PNG (esp. Unitech, and those cross-trained on the job) trained/groomed/graduated professionals in the IT/Web/Software industry are some of the best in the industry and in the region. So do not have second thoughts. You could just be losing that wonderful opportunity to someday be wanted by big-name companies out there (worldwide).

Freddie F. Apakali
Carlsbad, CA 92008
U.S.A
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bex
bex

June 4th, 2007, 9:37 pm #5

Freddie,
Mate thanks for the info and its really encouraging. Istap wantaim you long USA
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Freddie
Freddie

June 4th, 2007, 11:52 pm #6

Thanks Bex... Would be wonderful to see a lot of us from PNG in the idustry.

-F
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 5th, 2007, 6:56 am #7

I am a local graduate from Unitech with a Bach.Science.Computer Science, '99. I have pursued further studies and have also undergone professional certification training after graduation from Unitech, and being in the work scene.

I have worked as a professional web developer for the last 4 years (..up to present day) away from home (PNG). All in the San Diego region in Southern California (USA). I now work as a Web Application Development Consultant with Modern Solution. i.e. http://www.modernsolution.com . Modern Solution's primary responsibility and focus is on California's ever changing BioMedical Industry, and how we try to help surgeons and medical professionals market their new medical discoveries or their professional expertize. We are now heavily focused on Lasik Surgery (vision improvement) and Dentistry.

I can assure you I have made it, and anyone in PNG can make it. I live a happy and wonderful life, with a good paying job coupled with great benefits.

I know of one of my other colleagues who graduated a year behind me and we both worked together in the same company back in PNG. He now works for a mining giant in Australia, as one of their primary software developer/analyst. I hesitate to leave his name (particulars) here. There is one other guy who worked for Lihir a while back (wanpla senior ya..), who ended up finding himself a better dream-come-true job in London, as one of their MIMS (Mincom Information Management Systems) Programmer Analyst. I only heard of him and met him once, when I was back in PNG then....

There are a few perhaps the only 3 of us, or more (some others I am not aware of), that I list here. PNG (esp. Unitech, and those cross-trained on the job) trained/groomed/graduated professionals in the IT/Web/Software industry are some of the best in the industry and in the region. So do not have second thoughts. You could just be losing that wonderful opportunity to someday be wanted by big-name companies out there (worldwide).

Freddie F. Apakali
Carlsbad, CA 92008
U.S.A
A bit easier to get into the Australian work force compared to USA work force or other parts of the world.

Australia has a huge shortage of skilled workers and are seeking professionals from all over the world, paying airfares, relocation expenses, visa applications ect.

Whereas to get into the USA work force, one generally has to be sponsored to get in ...ie wife/husband, scholarship, work sponorship.
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FYI
FYI

June 6th, 2007, 8:18 am #8

Hello ALL,

Just want to know if there are any png IT skilled people working overseas. I heard of Engineers and other professionals but am not sure about our IT graduates. It will surely be encouraging if we have people working overseas. Dont want to change course to an engineering field but want to know if i may have a chance to work overseas in the future...

istap wantaim yupela
The economic powerhouses in the world can only maintain their dominance by attracting non-citizens with expertise and talent in IT and associated electronic fields.

There are several reasons for this:

(1) Attracting the best possible non-citizens means that their talents are gained by the successful attracting country, while lost to the countries they might have otherwise gone or returned to. Because it is a double effect (gain for one country, loss for another), the results of hiring non-citizens is magnified far more than when a citizen is hired by countries in Europe, North America, or Asia. America's IT industry is a perfect example. Non-citizens have been crucial in allowing the USA to maintain its first class status in the world. Because many of those non-citizens have come from Asia economic tigers, their capture by the USA has simultaneously hurt their countries of origin, much to America's benefit.

(2) Non-citizens in the IT industry contribute to economic health of Europe, USA, etc. For example: The USA has a large trade deficit which is troubling. However, the one area where the USA is still competitive despite its high labour costs is in the service industry. IT non-citizen experts are contributing hugely to software development and other services. Because these are the American products that people overseas most want to buy (America's heavy industry is no longer economically competitive with its products), the contribution of non-citizens greatly helps the USA and other nations to earn the foreign revenue necessary in offsetting balance of payments deficit.

(3) It was customary that non-citizens that schooled in Europe, USA, Japan, etc., to go back to their countries of origin. In some way or another their education has been subsidised, and that investment becomes lost when these people go back. The country where they are educated will benefit far more if those non-citizens can remain in the country where they were schooled and contribute to that country's economic growth. Whether or not the non-citizen would be a valuable asset in their country of origin is immaterial from this perspective. The greater goal is simply to recoup the investment in their education. That is best achieved by providing employment to the highest quality non-citizens, encouraging them not only to abandon plans to return to their country of origin, but also provide economic and other incentives that encourage them to become citizens of the countries where they have schooled so that their residence becomes permanent.

(4) It has been demonstrated time and time again that new ideas and ways of thinking are enhanced by non-citizens employed in the USA, Japan, Europe, etc. Again it is immaterial whether that creativity would be put to better use in the developing countries from where these non-citizens often come. The issue is the ability for the USA, Europe, Japan, etc to maintain their IT lead, which is critical in the shifting economies of the 21st Century. Staying in first place requires fresh ideas; fresh ideas in turn, require fresh blood, and this fresh blood is most likely to come from expertise that originally came from outside the IT leader nations, particularly from India and Asia. Only the cream of the crop of non-citizens should be retained by these IT dominant nations as a matter of strategy, because that will enhance the contribution that non-citizens make to maintaining IT leadership in the Europe, Japan, and the USA.

It cannot be overstated that IT and associated endeavours are now the lynch pin in national economies of the nations often termed as "developed." The successful recruitment of non-citizens is fundamental to these nations remaining as the economic and intellectual power houses of the world, as well as remaining the main owners of intellectual property that can be harnessed to further boost the economic interests of the IT dominant nations.

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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 6th, 2007, 8:33 am #9

You are a traitor
Anon, you are a narrow minded, pea brained individual.

Mind your business, it's his/her choice if they want to work overseas.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 6th, 2007, 12:15 pm #10

The economic powerhouses in the world can only maintain their dominance by attracting non-citizens with expertise and talent in IT and associated electronic fields.

There are several reasons for this:

(1) Attracting the best possible non-citizens means that their talents are gained by the successful attracting country, while lost to the countries they might have otherwise gone or returned to. Because it is a double effect (gain for one country, loss for another), the results of hiring non-citizens is magnified far more than when a citizen is hired by countries in Europe, North America, or Asia. America's IT industry is a perfect example. Non-citizens have been crucial in allowing the USA to maintain its first class status in the world. Because many of those non-citizens have come from Asia economic tigers, their capture by the USA has simultaneously hurt their countries of origin, much to America's benefit.

(2) Non-citizens in the IT industry contribute to economic health of Europe, USA, etc. For example: The USA has a large trade deficit which is troubling. However, the one area where the USA is still competitive despite its high labour costs is in the service industry. IT non-citizen experts are contributing hugely to software development and other services. Because these are the American products that people overseas most want to buy (America's heavy industry is no longer economically competitive with its products), the contribution of non-citizens greatly helps the USA and other nations to earn the foreign revenue necessary in offsetting balance of payments deficit.

(3) It was customary that non-citizens that schooled in Europe, USA, Japan, etc., to go back to their countries of origin. In some way or another their education has been subsidised, and that investment becomes lost when these people go back. The country where they are educated will benefit far more if those non-citizens can remain in the country where they were schooled and contribute to that country's economic growth. Whether or not the non-citizen would be a valuable asset in their country of origin is immaterial from this perspective. The greater goal is simply to recoup the investment in their education. That is best achieved by providing employment to the highest quality non-citizens, encouraging them not only to abandon plans to return to their country of origin, but also provide economic and other incentives that encourage them to become citizens of the countries where they have schooled so that their residence becomes permanent.

(4) It has been demonstrated time and time again that new ideas and ways of thinking are enhanced by non-citizens employed in the USA, Japan, Europe, etc. Again it is immaterial whether that creativity would be put to better use in the developing countries from where these non-citizens often come. The issue is the ability for the USA, Europe, Japan, etc to maintain their IT lead, which is critical in the shifting economies of the 21st Century. Staying in first place requires fresh ideas; fresh ideas in turn, require fresh blood, and this fresh blood is most likely to come from expertise that originally came from outside the IT leader nations, particularly from India and Asia. Only the cream of the crop of non-citizens should be retained by these IT dominant nations as a matter of strategy, because that will enhance the contribution that non-citizens make to maintaining IT leadership in the Europe, Japan, and the USA.

It cannot be overstated that IT and associated endeavours are now the lynch pin in national economies of the nations often termed as "developed." The successful recruitment of non-citizens is fundamental to these nations remaining as the economic and intellectual power houses of the world, as well as remaining the main owners of intellectual property that can be harnessed to further boost the economic interests of the IT dominant nations.
Papua New Guinean donations to the rich.
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