oh great, another thing to worry about...

oh great, another thing to worry about...

anne
anne

October 27th, 2011, 8:47 pm #1

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/236677.php

i've been doing this for a long time, now i'm a bit worried.
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BabyDance
BabyDance

October 27th, 2011, 9:02 pm #2

i'm not going to say it's not worrisome, however, most of us don't respond all that well to meds, so I wonder if it will have that bad of an effect on us. maybe one positive of being "AMA". not many of us are doing many high stim procedures.
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 28th, 2011, 4:16 am #3

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/236677.php

i've been doing this for a long time, now i'm a bit worried.
After I am done with embie banking, I am going to have a total removal of ovaries even if that means bringing on menopause a few years earlier than normal.

That eliminates one of my major worries.
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anne
anne

October 28th, 2011, 3:43 pm #4

i may have that done too. i've been working the girls pretty hard on and off the last eight years.
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Joined: August 6th, 2011, 6:43 am

October 28th, 2011, 4:29 pm #5

After I am done with embie banking, I am going to have a total removal of ovaries even if that means bringing on menopause a few years earlier than normal.

That eliminates one of my major worries.
Can they test your ovaries before you decide to have them removed? Hopefully they are just fine and you won't have to do that.
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 28th, 2011, 7:08 pm #6

He said ovary cancer is the most difficult to detect, the blood test is completely useless and so are U/S scans. He just conducted a big scale research on scanning women with a family history of ovary cancers, and they were only able to capture about 70% of the cases, the other 30% completely escaped the U/S because they showed normal. And the worst thing about ovary cancer is, it is a silent cancer just like pancreatic cancer, once the symptoms start to show, they are already at a late stage.

He recalled finding ovary cancer quite a few times when he did total hysterectomy (these women are post menopausal so they choose to have ovaries taken out as well), and sent the ovary tissue samples for biopsy. It was completely unexpected, and some of them were already spreading.

So his advice is, DO NOT worry about it because it is completely out of your control and early detection is unavailable, unlike paps smear or mammogram. If you decide to worry about it, take them out.
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Joined: August 6th, 2011, 6:43 am

October 28th, 2011, 7:15 pm #7

Too bad there isn't a test like mammograms or pap smears. It sounds so extreme to have surgery but in light of what he said, maybe it isn't a bad idea.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

October 30th, 2011, 3:07 am #8

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/236677.php

i've been doing this for a long time, now i'm a bit worried.
I asked Dr. Check and he said if you have quarterly US (after you have stopped TTC), it should catch tumors that might be growing. And since you are getting it done quarterly, you should be able to detect it in time. Insurance won't pay for this, but as a precaution, I would pay the $250 every quarter to get this US done.
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 7:55 am

October 30th, 2011, 3:31 am #9

I think there is a public perception that scanning (whether that's U/S, MRI, C/T or PET) is a guarantee things will be spotted. I am living with stage III cancer (not ovarian) and it was unsettling to me when my doctor pointed out that my regular scans (now annual) only pick up disease in about 70-85% of occasions. Meaning I could have a recurrence, have a scan, and the scan would still miss it. Good detection is usually a combo of clinical signs paired with some scan results, maybe some blood tests, and rechecking. Just because a tumour wasn't seen on one scan doesn't mean it's not "see-able", it just means the scan operator or the scan itself, missed it (we all know there can be lots of variation in U/S scan results) that time. Quarterly checking as you mentioned, gives you many more chances to see it on another occasion.

My "take away" message from when I was diagnosed was to keep visiting doctors if you are not reassured (it was my 4th doctor that finally diagnosed mine). There are SO many things that can happen to us (breast cancer, bowel cancer, ovarian, bladder.....there are over 200 kinds) that for me, having my ovaries removed is not something I would want to do, but I can imagine that is different for others (especially if they carry the BRCA-1 gene). I am focussing instead on living the healthiest life I can and hoping for the best.....

Al
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 30th, 2011, 4:34 am #10

I asked Dr. Check and he said if you have quarterly US (after you have stopped TTC), it should catch tumors that might be growing. And since you are getting it done quarterly, you should be able to detect it in time. Insurance won't pay for this, but as a precaution, I would pay the $250 every quarter to get this US done.
I asked the same question, but the oncologist said do NOT waste your money on scanning, because it is not precise, and small mass cannot be detected, or there may not even be a mass at all for the underlying cancer to be developing, the only golden standard is biopsy, but it is crazy to do biopsy of the ovaries every 3 months, without even knowing what to look for. Unlike paps smear or even endometrial biopsy which can be done without anesthesia at all, ovaries are a bit more difficult to get to so you need local anesthesia and sedation.

I would not trust Check's judgment on ovarian cancer detection, simply because he is not an expert in this area.
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