interesting about DHEA

interesting about DHEA

BroodyHen
BroodyHen

January 22nd, 2012, 11:46 pm #1

i've been thinking about DHEA lately as there are some recent posts on this board on the subject - mostly supporting it and some great success stories. but i found this on the yahoo immune board, from a FAQ with dr beer from 2005. ok, so its old. but interesting that he thinks DHEA is so bad, isn't it? i wonder what, if anything, has changed in the last few years and sadly he has passed away, so we can't ask him for an updated opinion.
BH

13. Question:
> >
> > I just recently learned about DHEA and cortisol levels. It seems
> > there
> > is a lot of hype and negative information out there on both
sides,
> > but
> > I'd love to hear his opinion on these body functions, possible
> > conditions, and treatments.
> >
> > Answer: Elevated DHEA levels can be as effective in women as the
> BCP
> > in preventing pregnancy and even ovulation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: How do DHEA and cortisol levels corelate to pregnancy
> > success or recurrent pregnancy loss? How do adrenal disfunctions
> > affect a woman's body and pregnancy outcomes (such as Addison's
> > disease)?
> >
> > Answer: DHEA is the precursor of Estrone, Testosterone and
> Cortisol.
> > Each of these latter hormones can prevent pregnancy. DHEA unlike
> > cortisol can be produced by the ovarian follicle and the adrenal
> > gland and your doctor must find out where it is coming from. The
> > treatment is totally different. DHEA should be measured in all
> > patients with infertility or pregnancy losses. In my experience
> DHEA
> > also can produce new fat cells and new fat cells store Estrone
> > further making ovulation less efficient. I urge all patients to
> > exercise, trim some weight and measure DHEA and estrone in
> addition
> > to the tests that most doctors recommend.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: What kind of symptoms would she exhibit that might urge
> her
> > to get tested?
> >
> > Answer: New weight gain on the thighs, hips and butt. Fullness or
> > fatness in the face and belly. Ruddy complexion over the cheeks
> and
> > forehead.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: What kinds of tests can you recommend to check for
these
> > conditions?
> >
> > Answer: See above.
> >
> > Question: I've read about saliva and blood tests, but am
concerned
> > about saliva test accuracy.
> >
> > Answer: I cannot comment on the saliva tests. I can on the blood
> > tests and these are very accurate done at any time during the
> cycle.
> >
> >
> > Question: What is considered detrimental-- if levels are too high
> or
> > too low?
> >
> > Answer: Too low, rejoice. Too high seek treatment.
> >
> > Question: And what are "healthy" level ranges for women trying to
> > conceive?
> >
> > Answer: The levels vary with the laboratories doing the testing.
> They
> > should be mid range or low in women and levels vary with age.
> >
> >
> > Question: If therapies are needed, what do you recommend?
> >
> > Answer: The treatment depends on where the DHEA is produced. If
in
> > the adrenals then treatment with an adrenal suppressant such as
> > prednisone is needed. If the production is in the ovary they
other
> > therapies are effective and the ovary is easier to treat than is
> the
> > adrenal origin.
> >
> > Alan E Beer, MD
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alima
alima

January 23rd, 2012, 12:16 am #2

it is so confusing about DHEA. Some women have found success with it, and then you hear other RE's like Dr. Beer who believe it can be detrimental. I just don't know which one to believe. CHR has been doing this for a few years and they did a study where they did PGD and found that the women that took DHEA had higher levels of normal eggs (less aneuploidy than the women that did not take it). But then you hear other RE's that say they have had miserable results with it. I did recently hear that CCRM is prescribing DHEA for their DOR patients. That makes me think that it might be worthwhile. Also, the CHR success rates on their website seems to be quite high for over 40 patients (of course, it is hard to know about statistics that are posted because I think some places just skew them to show the positive).
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anne
anne

January 24th, 2012, 4:29 pm #3

i've been thinking about DHEA lately as there are some recent posts on this board on the subject - mostly supporting it and some great success stories. but i found this on the yahoo immune board, from a FAQ with dr beer from 2005. ok, so its old. but interesting that he thinks DHEA is so bad, isn't it? i wonder what, if anything, has changed in the last few years and sadly he has passed away, so we can't ask him for an updated opinion.
BH

13. Question:
> >
> > I just recently learned about DHEA and cortisol levels. It seems
> > there
> > is a lot of hype and negative information out there on both
sides,
> > but
> > I'd love to hear his opinion on these body functions, possible
> > conditions, and treatments.
> >
> > Answer: Elevated DHEA levels can be as effective in women as the
> BCP
> > in preventing pregnancy and even ovulation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: How do DHEA and cortisol levels corelate to pregnancy
> > success or recurrent pregnancy loss? How do adrenal disfunctions
> > affect a woman's body and pregnancy outcomes (such as Addison's
> > disease)?
> >
> > Answer: DHEA is the precursor of Estrone, Testosterone and
> Cortisol.
> > Each of these latter hormones can prevent pregnancy. DHEA unlike
> > cortisol can be produced by the ovarian follicle and the adrenal
> > gland and your doctor must find out where it is coming from. The
> > treatment is totally different. DHEA should be measured in all
> > patients with infertility or pregnancy losses. In my experience
> DHEA
> > also can produce new fat cells and new fat cells store Estrone
> > further making ovulation less efficient. I urge all patients to
> > exercise, trim some weight and measure DHEA and estrone in
> addition
> > to the tests that most doctors recommend.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: What kind of symptoms would she exhibit that might urge
> her
> > to get tested?
> >
> > Answer: New weight gain on the thighs, hips and butt. Fullness or
> > fatness in the face and belly. Ruddy complexion over the cheeks
> and
> > forehead.
> >
> >
> >
> > Question: What kinds of tests can you recommend to check for
these
> > conditions?
> >
> > Answer: See above.
> >
> > Question: I've read about saliva and blood tests, but am
concerned
> > about saliva test accuracy.
> >
> > Answer: I cannot comment on the saliva tests. I can on the blood
> > tests and these are very accurate done at any time during the
> cycle.
> >
> >
> > Question: What is considered detrimental-- if levels are too high
> or
> > too low?
> >
> > Answer: Too low, rejoice. Too high seek treatment.
> >
> > Question: And what are "healthy" level ranges for women trying to
> > conceive?
> >
> > Answer: The levels vary with the laboratories doing the testing.
> They
> > should be mid range or low in women and levels vary with age.
> >
> >
> > Question: If therapies are needed, what do you recommend?
> >
> > Answer: The treatment depends on where the DHEA is produced. If
in
> > the adrenals then treatment with an adrenal suppressant such as
> > prednisone is needed. If the production is in the ovary they
other
> > therapies are effective and the ovary is easier to treat than is
> the
> > adrenal origin.
> >
> > Alan E Beer, MD
would love to ask him about those who get such a good response on it. i never have so i guess i won't be trying it again. thanks very much for posting it.
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anne
anne

January 24th, 2012, 4:32 pm #4

it is so confusing about DHEA. Some women have found success with it, and then you hear other RE's like Dr. Beer who believe it can be detrimental. I just don't know which one to believe. CHR has been doing this for a few years and they did a study where they did PGD and found that the women that took DHEA had higher levels of normal eggs (less aneuploidy than the women that did not take it). But then you hear other RE's that say they have had miserable results with it. I did recently hear that CCRM is prescribing DHEA for their DOR patients. That makes me think that it might be worthwhile. Also, the CHR success rates on their website seems to be quite high for over 40 patients (of course, it is hard to know about statistics that are posted because I think some places just skew them to show the positive).
when i wrote to them years ago they recommended mega high stimms. don't know if they still do, but high stimms seem to fry more...
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