The Exile: Overall Impressions and Comments

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Joined: July 26th, 2012, 9:00 pm

September 18th, 2012, 3:41 pm #136

Dutch Lassie wrote:... the inconsistencies in their appearances, there were really confusing for me too. I had to look back, and closer and even more closer to figure out who was who for many times.
I too had this problem and found it very disconcerting. Sometimes I was able to tell who was talking from the context, but other times I never did figure out who the speaker was. Like others writing in this topic I thought that Jamie in particular changed from the early graphics to the later ones.
webgirl wrote:I want to know how any of the males in the Outlander series ever got anything done with the Clairevage popping out. lol
I personally didn't like the way Claire's cleavage was portrayed. I realize the GN is close to being a comic book and that the real world is exaggerated. BUT..... (Outlander is a real world, isn't it? :) )

On the whole I'd give it a 4 out of 10. It only ranks this high IMHO because of the graphics of the scenery.

Maybe graphic novels are just not my forte. The Exile is the first GN I've read and I'm not looking forward to the next one. On the whole I think DG got bloodied a bit by this one as the comments on CS weren't all that favorable. I really hope she's gotten it out of her system and I regret the time she spent on the GN as it took time away from the writing of Book 8.
Jerry


"Aye, I believe ye, Sassenach. But it would ha' been a good deal easier if you'd only been a witch."
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DLT
Clan Fraser
DLT
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Joined: May 26th, 2012, 7:06 am

September 18th, 2012, 5:57 pm #137

Jerry, I agree with you. I read The Exile because it was part of the series, and I did not want to miss anything, but having to always figure out who was who from the pictures did not make it an easy read. There were a couple of new angles, such as Kenneth, and more about Jamie in France, but as these story lines have not (yet) appeared anywhere else they do not seem to be fully woven into the OL tapestry, so The Exile seems to be somewhat out on a limb.
Graphic novels don't really let you get into the character's skin, like you can in text, so I'll be content if all the future books are words only. Lots of words.
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Joined: September 10th, 2012, 7:06 pm

September 26th, 2012, 3:33 am #138

I loved the exile's beautiful art work but there were a few issues I had with it. It just seemed like it stuck to the plain bare bones of the story. All of the warmth, humor, and funny supporting characters were missing.
The Most Inspiring Song Ever
My story is one of life-saving grace. Feel free to PM me and ask me about it. :)
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Joined: February 26th, 2012, 5:35 am

September 26th, 2012, 10:45 pm #139

I agree with Jerry. And for me, it doesn't help that my eldest daughter is now studying to be an Illustrator. So...I tend to be overly critical of other people's work.
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NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
NigheanDubh
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Joined: September 17th, 2009, 3:16 am

September 28th, 2012, 1:04 am #140

JerryT wrote:I personally didn't like the way Claire's cleavage was portrayed. I realize the GN is close to being a comic book and that the real world is exaggerated. BUT..... (Outlander is a real world, isn't it? )
I didn't like it either. It took away some of Claire's dignity and made her appear cheap.
JerryT wrote:Maybe graphic novels are just not my forte. The Exile is the first GN I've read and I'm not looking forward to the next one. On the whole I think DG got bloodied a bit by this one as the comments on CS weren't all that favorable. I really hope she's gotten it out of her system and I regret the time she spent on the GN as it took time away from the writing of Book 8.
I enjoyed the Twilight GNs. I think I did so because the illustrator really "got" the characters. The TwilightGN was just another supplement to our love of the romance. The characters in the TwilightGN represented the characters in the book close to how I and I understand that S Meyer saw them (at least for me they did.) It seems that the OutlanderGN was not really written for the typical fan. The GN was meant to reach a different audience and to entice that audience to try reading the novels. Of course, once they'd start reading they would be hooked, no?

Some information I did enjoy finding out about:
I did enjoy discovering that Murtagh had actually seen Claire come out of the stones. Of course it makes sense that he would, as he came to her aid pretty quickly.
Kenneth is a total mystery.
I'm not sure I still understand the French girl incident with complete clarity.
I did enjoy some of the artistry on Jamie, in some of the frames. I agree that Jamie's look kept changing. In some frames he was the Jamie that I could imagine upon a rekilt. In other frames he looked completely different.
"'I wish to God,' said Gideon with mild exasperation, 'that you'd talk--just once--in prose like other people.'"
--Game of Kings
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Joined: September 10th, 2012, 7:06 pm

September 30th, 2012, 5:56 am #141

NigheanDubh wrote:
JerryT wrote:I personally didn't like the way Claire's cleavage was portrayed. I realize the GN is close to being a comic book and that the real world is exaggerated. BUT..... (Outlander is a real world, isn't it? )
I didn't like it either. It took away some of Claire's dignity and made her appear cheap.
JerryT wrote:Maybe graphic novels are just not my forte. The Exile is the first GN I've read and I'm not looking forward to the next one. On the whole I think DG got bloodied a bit by this one as the comments on CS weren't all that favorable. I really hope she's gotten it out of her system and I regret the time she spent on the GN as it took time away from the writing of Book 8.
I enjoyed the Twilight GNs. I think I did so because the illustrator really "got" the characters. The TwilightGN was just another supplement to our love of the romance. The characters in the TwilightGN represented the characters in the book close to how I and I understand that S Meyer saw them (at least for me they did.) It seems that the OutlanderGN was not really written for the typical fan. The GN was meant to reach a different audience and to entice that audience to try reading the novels. Of course, once they'd start reading they would be hooked, no?

Some information I did enjoy finding out about:
I did enjoy discovering that Murtagh had actually seen Claire come out of the stones. Of course it makes sense that he would, as he came to her aid pretty quickly.
Kenneth is a total mystery.
I'm not sure I still understand the French girl incident with complete clarity.
I did enjoy some of the artistry on Jamie, in some of the frames. I agree that Jamie's look kept changing. In some frames he was the Jamie that I could imagine upon a rekilt. In other frames he looked completely different.
Jamie's looks did change A LOT. And I don't like the way that the artist drew her face or her cleavage. It just seemed a little weird.

As for the french girl incident, I think Jamie fell for a french girl. Then, he goes back and discovers another man assaulting her. And accidentally shoots her while trying to help her out. It makes sense that way; when claire is learning to fight in the original novel, murtagh and the others explain how inaccurate/hard to fire the pistols of the time were.
The Most Inspiring Song Ever
My story is one of life-saving grace. Feel free to PM me and ask me about it. :)
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NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
Joined: September 17th, 2009, 3:16 am

October 2nd, 2012, 12:16 am #142

Thanks Madge. :D
"'I wish to God,' said Gideon with mild exasperation, 'that you'd talk--just once--in prose like other people.'"
--Game of Kings
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Joined: September 10th, 2012, 7:06 pm

October 10th, 2012, 4:06 am #143

You're quite welcome. I still don't understand the business with kenneth, but I think that's because I've only just started reading voyager for the first time.
The Most Inspiring Song Ever
My story is one of life-saving grace. Feel free to PM me and ask me about it. :)
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Joined: August 18th, 2014, 3:07 pm

September 19th, 2014, 10:53 am #144

Yeah!
Just received my copy of The Exile in the post! I had to order it from the US and to be honest I'd forgotten all about it so imagine my delight!!! :yipee: :teehee: :clap: :rotfl:

I've never bought a graphic novel before so this will certainly be a different experience for me; can't wait! :read:
We are all born for love. It is the principle of existence, and its only end.
Benjamin Disraeli
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motherofprayer
Clan Fraser
Joined: December 10th, 2012, 5:11 am

September 19th, 2014, 11:52 am #145

Demaris - So glad you are so excited! Let us know what you think of it!!
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Lisa SF
Clan Fraser
Joined: August 2nd, 2011, 11:43 pm

September 19th, 2014, 2:41 pm #146

Demaris, enjoy! It's a different way to approach the story... but it's pretty fun to see yet another representation of what happened. :)
"There are no faster or firmer friendships than those formed between people who love the same books." - Irving Stone

Just another reader with a blog... check it out here.
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Joined: August 29th, 2014, 4:02 pm

September 19th, 2014, 2:50 pm #147

Demaris, I hope that you enjoy The Exile. I needed several tries to enjoy it. I suppose that I am "graphically challenged". I do recommend that you also read the short story "Virgins" to compare information in these publications with Outlander.
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Joined: July 26th, 2012, 9:00 pm

September 19th, 2014, 5:20 pm #148

I'm not especially fond of The Exile but did find it interesting. Graphic novels are a whole new approach to fiction.
Jerry


"Aye, I believe ye, Sassenach. But it would ha' been a good deal easier if you'd only been a witch."
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Joined: December 13th, 2011, 12:17 am

September 19th, 2014, 8:10 pm #149

The Exile just got checked into my library last night. lol Thumbed through it today.
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Joined: August 9th, 2017, 7:04 pm

July 8th, 2018, 5:11 pm #150

I bought this book hoping it would add some new dimensions to my understanding of Outlander from Murtagh's perspective - and it did - but also expecting to be a bit underwhelmed by the artwork, having read through the comments here. 
Honestly, I hated the artwork.
There were some panels at the beginning, where the faces were rendered with more care and detail; here, I liked the artist's take on Murtagh's face. But he did not sustain this level of detail and care with the rest of the novel. The faces were all too similar, and I could barely tell one character from another. They all have quite flat faces, long hooked noses and 'down' mouths, like upturned 'u's, and all the men had slicked-back mullets... not remotely characteristic of the period, when men would have worn their hair long, but styled in a tail or queue. Many gentlemen (such as Ned Gowan and the Duke) would of course have worn wigs... 18th century wigs, with tails.
And speaking of anachronistic styling...
I was particularly disappointed by the costuming. I'll point out these:
- the British soldiers were wearing uniforms typical of the 1840s (Crimean War) - over 100 years after the events of OL!
- the Scots were all dressed in short-tailed jackets with broad shoulders typical of a Victorian ghillie, but with extra tartan. Again, these jackets were not in fashion for maybe another 120-130 years.
- the women's clothes! Most of them looked barely dressed! They seemed to be wearing white shifts with puffed sleeves (Early 19th Century, Regency period) but this was *all* they wore! Geilie was not dressed like the wife of the most important and respected official in Cranesmuir, but a tavern wench from the early 17th century, or perhaps the generic  'tavern wench' costume you can buy off Amazon for £19.99....
- Ned Gowan's Late Victorian/ Early Edwardian beard!! Any respectable gentleman of this period would have been clean-shaven and bewigged, not sporting a beard like Sigmund Freud!
- What on earth was The Duke of Sandringham wearing??? See above for the facial hair, but he seemed to be dressed in a kind of court-jester all-in-one, like Harlequin?? He looked like he had been styled on Falstaff...

Really, I do find  these costuming and styling errors unforgivable. How easy is it to google 'British army uniforms 1740'? Or to research 18th century costume? It's just lazy and disrespectful to the author of the novel (DG). I notice that DG gave a lengthy explanation to readers about why Claire's dress in the opening scenes did not have a peony print as described in OL, but was plain blue. She did not - presumably because she *could not* - comment on why none of the rest of the clothes or styling were suited to the time period of Scotland in 1743. I can only assume she was as disappointed as I felt with the artist's rendition of her characters and scenes.

 I think, when written work is rendered into a visual art form, be it TV, film or graphic novel, attention should be paid to details which help to bring the time period to life with accuracy, to respect the original work, and the intelligence of the readers and viewers.
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