CM: Part 1: Chapter 4

Laura
Clan Fraser
Joined: September 16th, 2009, 12:54 pm

September 6th, 2018, 6:25 pm #1

CM: Part 1: Chapter 4

Another great chapter chock-full of goodies.

Marguerite de Lustrac, Marechale de St Andre, came downstairs a little late; superbly corseted; a little ponderous; her aura heady as peaches, sun-ripened and perfumed in a silversmith's workshop.

Philippa to Lymond:  
'Your self-esteem has had a lifetime of steady attention.'

Philippa and Lymond regarding Austin Grey, 'a chivalrous child'.
'If you are going to marry the youth, I shan't touch him.'
'But you will be nasty to him,' said Philippa gloomily.  'You know you can't help it.'
'I shall probably be nasty to him,' agreed Lymond firmly. 'But I shan't touch him...'

Philippa at her best:
Philippa said patiently, 'All I am trying to point out is that you may please yourself. With or without a divorce, I am quite capable of making my own arrangements.'
The Ultimate Guide to Dorothy Dunnett's THE GAME OF KINGS available here.
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audiobooklover
Clan Fraser
Joined: July 19th, 2010, 10:09 pm

September 6th, 2018, 7:39 pm #2

Thanks Laura.  Some completely random thoughts:

I really am baffled about what Marthe actually wants.  Jerrott is clearly just miserable, and Marthe worked to keep Lymond in France, but does she actually want him and Philippa to stay married?

I was surprised that Lymond attacked Archie before realizing who he was.  Interesting comment about him having to choose whom he'll be loyal to.  I think Philippa is a good choice in the situation and I'm glad she has someone around she can count on (even though I don't doubt her abilities, I do think she might need help at times and she's safer with Archie there).

Does Philippa really have any interest in Austin Grey?  He seems nice enough, but he just doesn't seem to have enough spirit for Philippa.

Can someone remind me of when Lymond hit Philippa - on the jaw and the arm?

I thought when I was listening that there was a bit about whether Lymond wanted to marry Guzel and a comment that indicated something about Marthe maybe marrying Guzel instead (or something of the sort), but I couldn't find anything as I skimmed just now.  Did I imagine that?  Or can someone give me a clue?
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Joined: August 25th, 2014, 5:24 am

September 6th, 2018, 7:56 pm #3

audiobooklover wrote: Can someone remind me of when Lymond hit Philippa - on the jaw and the arm?

In DK, Lymond hit Philippa on the jaw because she refused to leave the Nixon's keep when she was ordered to, for her own safety. (Part 3, Ch 8, the Hot Trodd)

In PIF, aboard the ship, Lymond hit her on the arm when she tried to press a soothing cup of something on him. I think he was actually just knocking the cup away, but her arm got in the way.  I think it was in Ch 6, 'Leone'

And in this chapter, somewhere in the middle: 

‘She was trained at the English court,’ said Lymond pleasantly. ‘Mary Tudor on top of the ministrations of Güzel would alter anyone’s habits.’

‘I had forgotten,’ said Marthe. Whimsically, the disarming blue gaze scanned her step-brother. ‘Of course, she was taught by Güzel. Then you must certainly forget your divorce and do your duty by her, my gallant Francis. Think of the continuity!’
For a moment no one spoke. Then Lymond got to his feet. ‘I have a better idea. You marry her,’ he suggested.

It's a bit unclear whether he's referring to Guzel or Philippa, however. 
Mary

“...I prize freedom of the mind above freedom of the body. I claim the right to make my own mistakes and keep quiet about them. ... My life is at your disposal, but not my thoughts.”
Francis Crawford, in Dorothy Dunnett's Game of Kings
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audiobooklover
Clan Fraser
Joined: July 19th, 2010, 10:09 pm

September 6th, 2018, 8:36 pm #4

Thanks pagali!  

In listening, I had assumed it meant marrying Guzel, but rereading what you quoted does sound like it might mean Philippa.  At least I hadn't completely imagined the comment. . .  :lol:
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Joined: January 31st, 2017, 5:26 am

September 6th, 2018, 9:12 pm #5

Fabulous quotes!  Thank you, Laura.

A few other takeaways for me.
I have no more than you have, he said to his sister (page 45)
Telling her that he is like her in that he, too, has no name, family, history.
And I have Jerrott. (page 46)
Marthe is so jealous of what she perceives Lymond to have or to potentially have in Russia.
You will not go to Russia because your fate is here.  Or do you not know it? (page 47)
I think this speaks to Marthe's role in carrying out Camille's plans for Lymond, and why she schemed to keep him in France.  Jerrott comes across as completely clueless and certainly was when it came to the machinations of his beloved wife!

Also, it always seemed odd to me Lymond's secret hike up the hill in the first part of the chapter with Archie following him.  I take it that it was Lymond's undercover scoping out of the lay of the land as he contemplates the coming attacks.  A brief description of the Rhone, rolling country side and the Alpine snows of the gateway to Italy (page 38).  There was no insight as to what Lymond was thinking or his motivation for hiking up the hill, so conjecture on my part.  
Deirdre

"And deep within him, missing its accustomed tread,his heart paused, and gave one single stroke...
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NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
Joined: September 17th, 2009, 3:16 am

September 6th, 2018, 10:36 pm #6

Thank you, Laura for your post.  I love the choices for your quotations. 

Some thoughts:  
While reading I did some research on peaches:  
a peach is a symbol of youth and immortality. The fruit of the peach symbolizes the continuous process of renewal of life, and the peach flower - spring, feminine charm, softness, peace, wedding, and also virginity and purity.
peach symbolism
La dame must feel quite young after her evening with Lymond.  They were probably quite drunk--at least Lymond was.  
I also thought back to PiF with Kuzum squishing the peaches under his little toes.  A little connection, maybe?  Later Lymond stands by the orange trees.  The fruit is redolent of youth Philippa has to offer.  Poor Archie--Lymond felt bad about that one, I'm sure.  I love that Archie is standing firm about his loyalty to Philippa.  Do you think Lymond was surprised with the choice? Glad of Archie's response? Perhaps asked purposefully, as a way of determining if Archie could protect his wife?

Lymond complains about his self esteem when Philippa puts him in the same league as Kate.  He cares what Philippa thinks.  He even pays her a compliment, in a roundabout way, about her dress and how Philippa could wear down la Marechale "looking like that." Philippa must be looking quite fabulous, or "exquisite."  He's quite taken with her.  Philippa has to remind him to turn to the merchant bowing.  Philippa makes a remark about Lymond's own choice of wardrobe and how he never wears crewel garters and wadmoll mittens.  Lymond's response is also outrageous, but one never knows...
 These characters just leap off the page.  Very visually evocative. 

Lymond says: "Shall we go in, lewd and rude, and provoke them?" p. 44.  What does Lymond have in mind?  A continuation of Blackfriars with some lewdness with Philippa.  Philippa will have none of it.  Brava, Philippa!  Silly Lymond!

pagali wrote:  It's a bit unclear whether he's referring to Guzel or Philippa, however. 
Since Marthe was going on about Philippa's training at the seraglio and of the continuity Lymond would get, I did get the impression that it was about Marthe marrying Philippa.  (It makes sense that it is Philippa since Marthe is extolling the benefits of Lymond not divorcing Philippa, that Lymond suggest Marthe marry her (Philippa.)

Later, Lymond complains about Vish replacing him.  Marthe says she got Jerott.  I interpreted it as Marthe having been overthrown by Guzel for Lymond and she had to settle.  Now Lymond has experienced some of the same treatment.  Marthe's telling him to deal with it.   Poor Jerott--he does seem to be the butt of all the jokes. Lymond is now overthrown (in a manner of speaking) by Guzel.  
Guzel is to Marthe as Vish is to Lymond. Both Marthe and Lymond have been supplanted by their respective loves and are left with Jerott and Philippa, respectively.  It's mean of Marthe.  I believe that analogy works.  Lymond can be mean, but I think Marthe is meaner.  

Interesting how well Lymond knows Philippa, or so he believes:  He knows when she speaks with conviction and when she's being obstreperous.  Such an admission speaks tons.  I really abhor the hitting references, but it was a mother approved punch.   Kate thought Philippa needed it for her own good.  Philippa would have been burned to a crisp had she stayed at the keep.  
D2MAC:  Also, it always seemed odd to me Lymond's secret hike up the hill in the first part of the chapter with Archie following him.  I take it that it was Lymond's undercover scoping out of the lay of the land as he contemplates the coming attacks.  A brief description of the Rhone, rolling country side and the Alpine snows of the gateway to Italy (page 38).  There was no insight as to what Lymond was thinking or his motivation for hiking up the hill, so conjecture on my part.  
I came to the same conclusion.  It was part of Lymond's reconnaissance.  

Woot!  Another great chapter to decipher.  There is so much!   We could literally go line by line.  Another gem of a chapter.  
"'I wish to God,' said Gideon with mild exasperation, 'that you'd talk--just once--in prose like other people.'"
--Game of Kings
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Lady Jayne
Clan Fraser
Joined: October 4th, 2009, 7:41 pm

September 6th, 2018, 11:26 pm #7

Thank you for the summary highlighting choice scenes and comments, Laura. 

Here are my random thoughts --

I had also thought Lymond was suggesting that Marthe marry Guzel, but it makes more sense for him to be talking about Philippa than Guzel at this point.

So, Lymond did not know that Philippa had visited Midculter? I thought he knew everything. And Philippa had no idea her husband was in Lyon?

Philippa has noticed that Lymond does not like to be touched: "she had found that out a good while ago" (44, Putnams). This is a key observation, but she must realize the rule applies mainly to her for Lymond gives Jerott a hug. That must also be a rarity, judging by Marthe's remark that they should do it again for applause.  :lol:

I couldn't help noticing the several references to light, darkness and blindness in this chapter. For instance, after Lymond and Archie finish their conversation, Dunnett writes "Cascades of green light fell on his path and damasked all the tall tree trunks descending below him, arresting him with blinding dazzlement" (40, Putnams hc). Then there is the dark vault to reach Jerott and Marthe's abode, and later Philippa reappears to discuss Lymond's wish for a divorce -- " 'I beg your pardon,' said a firm voice from the doorway. A wash of light brought clarity suddenly into the darkening room and bestowed a robust chestnut gloss on the bare head of Philippa Sommerville entering with a candlestick in one hand. She advanced, aiming the flame at her husband . . . " (49 Putnams hc). This is St. Philippa with her halo glowing. What a vision she must be in addition to her opulent attire!

I was curious about traboules and looked them up for a visual reference. Here are two examples in Lyon. They do cast a somber glow to the area before they reach the Dame de Doubtance's Gothic home with  "the red columns with writhing forms, half beast and half human, carved on the capitals" (45 Putnams). Traboule_Lyon.jpg Traboule_in_Lyon,_France_1.jpg
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NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
Joined: September 17th, 2009, 3:16 am

September 7th, 2018, 1:44 am #8

Great point about light and dark elements in this chapter, Lady Jayne. 
It does seem like many things are coming to light with Philippa's influence.  She is not afraid to stand her ground even though she may get another aggressive action from Lymond.  It is her light that is shining in and on all the dark corners of the house to discover the truth.  
Lymond is being exposed: sleeping with people like La Dame de Marechale, for example.  I'm sure there are many. 
Thank you for the visual of the traboules.  

The DdD's house is so creepy.  
"'I wish to God,' said Gideon with mild exasperation, 'that you'd talk--just once--in prose like other people.'"
--Game of Kings
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Joined: October 12th, 2016, 1:49 am

September 7th, 2018, 2:50 am #9

This is a favourite chapter of mine...there is just so much in it including the glorious descriptive writing as Darling Dorothy shows us the green hill  of Fourviere & the vista from the city to the Alps. I had wondered why FC went up there at all and my conclusion was similar to the ideas expressed, but above all I think he was just needing time to reassess & re-group. He is not only facing this very complicated campaign with so  much at stake, there is the St. Andre situation, Marthe & Jerrott  and then above all  Philippa is here in Lyon where he has to see her! Our indomitable hero is beset & bothered  at every turn! Next he has to face another meeting with Philippa and a return visit to the House of Camille. Bewitched & bewildered?
I love the banter between FC & Phillippa as they ride towards this rather unwelcome but unavoidable tryst.
Thanks Lady Jayne for bringing in the contrast with light and dark. That is so atmospheric as well as symbolic. The pictures of Lyon and the traboules also add to the feeling of a storm approaching.
Marthe...I find her such a paradox. Her motives are so hard to unravel. I am so sorry that she & Jerott are living this life of conflict  with what seems so little intimacy  or nurture.

One of the things that really struck me is where FC hides his hands behind him and there are more  chiaroscuro images again of light & dark Vintage p. 49 
The double candlelight underlit his hair and his eyes and his cheekbones, all of them untrustworthy evidence. Philippa from long experience watched his hands, long-fingered and resilient, pressed hard on the walnut frieze of the sideboard.
Heather
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Joined: November 26th, 2016, 2:50 pm

September 7th, 2018, 3:36 pm #10

Thanks Laura and everybody for such delicious quotes. FC and Philippa together are a bit too much.
And thanks for the explanation of FC visit to the hill. I always assumed he was under the effects of stress and a headache and needed some time alone, but Lymond being Lymond, your explanation seems more likely!.

the references to darkness and light are overpowering. Philippa entering the light, as Lady Jayne says...with her halo, I found this image so strong...
I'll come back for more!

On a second thought... DD when describing Lymond tend to use other people perception of him, and it seems we are seeing Philippa through Lymond's eyes, don't you think? she means the light to him, and not to everybody?
Du lien de tes mains, maîtresse, je te prye.
Enlace-moy le corps, maîtresse...
Enlace-moy le corps
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Joined: June 5th, 2017, 11:15 am

September 7th, 2018, 4:33 pm #11

Here are a few random thoughts on this chapter:

Archie warns L about Marthe and tell him that it was her suggesting to Strozzi to delay the divorce in order to get L to stay in France. This is news to L; he had thought it was Jerrott.

L is surprised that his mother sanctioned P’s search in the papers. This does not fit with his  view of his mother as an adulteress.

Marthe’s mean comment: ‘The practice is to kiss the bride, Francis. You may come and shake hands with the bridegroom.’ Here she equates herself with the bridegroom and Jerrott with the bride (he has already been kissed). She certainly sees herself as wearing the trousers. She owns the house; the house must not display his name; she earns more money then him. And she lets him know it.

Marthe says she is ‘dealing in bodily and ghostly comforts’. Certainly the first part must be another blow for Jerrott.

When L mentions that P was trained by Guzel before going to the English court Marthe gets ugly towards him as well. If P was taught by Guzel, then why not consumate the marriage. It would almost be the same as in Russia with Guzel. Lymond, I think, gets extremely angry and tells Marthe to marry P instead. It would obviously also be continuity for Marthe as Guzel was also her previous lover.

At the end of the divorce discussion, Marthe is looking at P ‘with an odd look, not entirely friendly, which she [P] failed to interpret.’ At this point, I think, Marthe is starting to make sense of the strong undercurrents that abound when either L or P are discussing their relationship(s). Francis behaving as he does and now P not wanting to divorce means there is something going on between them.

Great lines:

... ‘I should wear my hair down.’ ...’As a maiden lady, you would wear anyone down ...’

P: ‘I said you were a friend of my mother’s and I was a friend of your mother’s.’  ‘I think that about sums it up,’ Lymond said. His voice was a trifle unsteady.

‘Your self-esteem has had a lifetime of steady attention.’

‘Do you consider I am old enough to stop calling you Mr Crawford?’ ‘No,’ said Mr Crawford shortly. ‘What alternatives would you suggest? Master? Uncle?’ ‘ That would certainly unsettle the Marechale, for one, ...’

‘I have a feeling that someone is going to be malicious, and we may as well set them a standard.’

‘Where the spirite is, there it is always sommer.’
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Joined: January 31st, 2017, 5:26 am

September 7th, 2018, 5:21 pm #12

NigheanDubh wrote: Great point about light and dark elements in this chapter, Lady Jayne. 
It does seem like many things are coming to light with Philippa's influence.  She is not afraid to stand her ground even though she may get another aggressive action from Lymond.  It is her light that is shining in and on all the dark corners of the house to discover the truth.  
Lymond is being exposed: sleeping with people like La Dame de Marechale, for example.  I'm sure there are many. 
Thank you for the visual of the traboules.  

The DdD's house is so creepy.  
Lady Jayne/ND:  I also caught the play on light, particularly when Phillipa rejoined the group with her group 
A wash of light brought clarity suddenly into the darkening room and bestowed a robust chestnut gloss (Vintage, p49)
I thought it was such a contrast to the overall description of the Gaultier/DdD house as dark, dirty and gloomy--and yes creepy!!
the lustreless chill of a complex house maintained by masterless servants (Vintage pg 47
Deirdre

"And deep within him, missing its accustomed tread,his heart paused, and gave one single stroke...
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Joined: January 31st, 2017, 5:26 am

September 7th, 2018, 5:49 pm #13

LadyJane:  Thank you for the pictures of the traboules. I, too, love the visual references.  There are several maps of "Vieux Lyon," and typical of DD, you can follow the route of Lymond and Phillipa from Rue Garillan, across the river to Rue Merciere to the corner of Tupin.  Looks like there is a chocolate shop there today!  
Rue Merciere .JPG
Deirdre

"And deep within him, missing its accustomed tread,his heart paused, and gave one single stroke...
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Joined: June 4th, 2014, 8:47 am

September 7th, 2018, 6:04 pm #14

Laura, thank you for the quotes--how to pick among so many! These are wonderful and also inspire discussion.

My random thoughts on this chapter:

I agree that Lymond is surveying the town and planning the defenses on his walk. But I, as with some of you, also thought that Lymond escaped the Hotel St. Andre because of the stress and pressure he was under and because he felt one of his headaches coming on. He seems to be trying to ward it off. In fact, I think he was experiencing the signs of incipient blindness and is trying to prevent a full-blown attack:
The monk, turning, dipped both his hands in the water and then, shaking free of the stifling hood, cupped his face in its sweet, mossy coolness. His hair, burnished gold in the sunshine, was innocent of any tonsure. And the supple fingers, laced over his eyelids, identified him to Archie Abernethy as clearly as the rich fabric glimpsed under the habit.

Dunnett, Dorothy. Checkmate: Sixth in the Legendary Lymond Chronicles (The Lymond Chronicles Book 6) (p. 38). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. 
First, Lymond is cooling his face with the water (trying to prevent a headache), but much more telling, this finger are covering his face, something he has done more than once in the past when the blindness threatens or strikes. I also wondered if his vision was clouded, which was why he didn't recognize at first it was Archie. Lymond's definitely not entirely blind, but he seems to be on the verge of another blinding headache.

I think the incipient blindness theory is supported by this exchange with Archie a little later in their conversation:
[Archie] said suddenly, ‘Why did you come to the hill?’ Lymond looked at him, and for a moment perhaps, might have answered.
Lymond thought about telling Archie the truth, but changed his mind.

I love Archie and Lymond's verbal sparring! Archie is one man who is unintimidated by FC. Don't you love it when Archie described Lymond's sojourn in Russia as blowing his tucket (tooting his own horn)? 

If we had any doubt about Marthe's scheming, it's gone now.  However, we still do not have a clue as to Marthe's motives. Lymond doesn't seem to know either. 
‘If we’d known ye were in Lyon, she’d never have come here. She was going to Blois to track down some bluidy papers, but Mistress Marthe answered her letter first, and told her to come here to begin with.’ His black eyes rested on Lymond’s downcast blue ones. ‘She means you and Mistress Philippa to meet in her house.’ ‘By shifty means and crooked ways. I have realized that,’ said Lymond. ‘Ah, and who is he apart, marked out with sprays of olive and offering sacrifice? [why this allusion to Virgil, Aeneid, referring to Caesar Augustus?]

Dunnett, Dorothy. Checkmate: Sixth in the Legendary Lymond Chronicles (The Lymond Chronicles Book 6) (p. 39). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. 
Francis and Philippa! They are irresistible together, so perfectly matched. I love this little line because it shows us how well suited she is to FC. 

"Bow. To your right. Someone is bowing to you."

Like a good partner, Philippa understands what he needs and how he should behave even when he is not aware of it himself. And Philippa is not afraid to give Lymond direction. It's a very "wifely" moment. So subtle yet perfectly pitched!

Yet another example of how smooth and classy Philippa is. Jerott doesn't recognize her at first and did not know Marthe had invited Philippa to their house at the same time as Lymond. How embarrassing, how humiliating for Jerott to be made a fool of by his wife. But Philippa, realizing this, smoothly covers for Jerott:
"Jerott’s right hand jerked and then remained still, trapped under Philippa’s tranquil fingers. She leaned up and kissed him on the other cheek. ‘We’ve been working on this for days. Did we succeed in surprising you?’"

This is so kind on Philippa's part, to make it seem that Marthe's mean-spirited exclusion of Jerott, designed to embarrass him in front of Lymond and Philippa, was all part of a pleasant surprise. Philippa is a class act.

I do think we may have a motive for Marthe marrying Jerott:
Lymond said, ‘Why did you want me to stay in France? You know that Prince Vishnevetsky has taken my place in Vorobievo?’ With slow charm, Marthe gave him a smile.And I have Jerott,’ she said. ‘How cheaply you rate me. ...’

Dunnett, Dorothy. Checkmate: Sixth in the Legendary Lymond Chronicles (The Lymond Chronicles Book 6) (pp. 46-47). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. 
Guzel has replaced Lymond with Vish, and Marthe, by marrying Jerott, has replaced Lymond as Jerott's idol. When Marthe says that Lymond rates her "cheaply," I think she means that he doesn't seem to realize the enormity of what she has done. By marrying Jerott, Marthe has supplanted Francis as Jerott's "true love," a truly dastardly thing to do to Jerott because she does not love him. The key to me is this: "With slow charm, Marthe gave him a smile." She is smiling what must be an evil smile because she is at last revealing to her brother her twisted scheme to make him pay for taking Guzel from her, even though it means using and destroying an unwitting Jerott. This may be why she married Jerott--to get back at Francis for taking Guzel from her.
"Look up," said the Master, "and see them. The teaching stars, beyond worship and commonplace tongues. The infinite eyes of innocence." Dorothy Dunnett, Game of Kings
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NigheanDubh
Clan Fraser
Joined: September 17th, 2009, 3:16 am

September 8th, 2018, 1:21 am #15

What most excellent comments and observations. 
lormza wrote:  "On a second thought... DD when describing Lymond tend to use other people perception of him, and it seems we are seeing Philippa through Lymond's eyes, don't you think? she means the light to him, and not to everybody?"
I see what you're saying.  Lymond sees her as above him.  So we are in Lymond's pov.  Is that the slippery third?

Overthehills wrote: At this point, I think, Marthe is starting to make sense of the strong undercurrents that abound when either L or P are discussing their relationship(s). Francis behaving as he does and now P not wanting to divorce means there is something going on between them.
Certainly Marthe would detect the sexual tension between the two, especially emanating from Lymond.  It must be tough for Lymond to endure such scrutiny from his sister.  Even Jerott has to ask why Lymond is still there and whether he plans on bringing Philippa back to Russia.  

"Lymond turned to the woman he now called his step-sister and Philippa, her skin chilled to goose-flesh, watched them together."
Philippa is definitely freaked out looking at the two of them.  Where are their genes coming from?  That they both look so alike?
"They were so alike: pretty as jonquils with their white skin and blue eyes and pale perfumed heads, gliding the gloom of the courtyard."
Vintage p. 45.
Here is another play of light against the dark.  Chiaroscuro as Lady Jayne and Hevva pointed out.  The description is almost spooky. 

Some jonquils:

I didn't remember the look of them.

D2MAC, many thanks for posting the map.  I was wondering how that route would have gone.  There would be a chocolate shop there waiting for us.  How did the DdD know?   :grin:

Clewless wrote: First, Lymond is cooling his face with the water (trying to prevent a headache), but much more telling, this finger are covering his face, something he has done more than once in the past when the blindness threatens or strikes. I also wondered if his vision was clouded, which was why he didn't recognize at first it was Archie. Lymond's definitely not entirely blind, but he seems to be on the verge of another blinding headache.
That interpretation of the blindness coming on makes sense.  His motivation was to scout out the territory which Lymond always does, and to also remove himself to get some relief before the headache would leave him paralyzed.  I have to wonder how he was able to move so quickly and throw Archie and use his strength to get him up from the ledge he was about to fall from.  Would Lymond have been so in tune to his surroundings if he were feeling unwell?  And was Lymond dazzled as he is walking through the ferned wood or was it the migraine causing that impression of light--seeing stars from the pain.  Or also a bit of a hangover from all the drinking he did to bed the Marechale?

After Lymond's remark about himself and Philippa provoking the Blythes, I got the impression that Lymond held out his arm for Philippa to take.   
"She refrained, with not difficulty in grasping his sleek, grogram arm and march forward instead, out of the the tunnel and into the Gaultier courtyard." p. 44
I wonder if this interpretation of Lymond holding his arm out for her is plausible*.  Philippa is too miffed with his attitude to take part of it and moves ahead without him.   Any ideas about this little scene?

*ETA:  Lymond doesn't like to be touched, unless he initiates it, as he did by kissing Philippa's hands in the last chapter.  I believe, the "shall we go in lewd and rude and  provoke them?" (44) would have included holding out his arm for her to grasp.  He did touch her too, earlier, when he mounted Philippa on the chestnut (Lymond rides a chestnut usually)
"With the skill born of long experience, Lymond lent himself to all the introductions, circumnavigated the subsequent questions with steely courtesy, and mounting his bride on the little chestnut they brought out for her, rode beside her down the precipitous slopes..." (p.41)
"'I wish to God,' said Gideon with mild exasperation, 'that you'd talk--just once--in prose like other people.'"
--Game of Kings
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