Prediction Time! Who Do You Feel Will Appear on This Year's R&RHoF Nominee Ballot?

Prediction Time! Who Do You Feel Will Appear on This Year's R&RHoF Nominee Ballot?

Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 06:12 #1

Well, there's snow somewhere, so it's time to take out the bats, make snowballs, and then start swinging at pitched snowballs to see which one of us can make the most snow go forward.

In other words, it's time to make predictions as to who will appear on the R&RHoF ballot.


However, I'm doing a protest prediction this time.


Yeah, the last time I did a protest prediction, I wound up getting five right anyways.  


But that time, my prediction was actually half a protest prediction, and half a serious prediction.


Okay, okay, the protest side actually wound up getting three out of the five right.


So, does that mean that I'm actually going to do better if I make the entire prediction a protest prediction?


Not if the type of acts I'm protesting about are the pre-Beatles acts, I'm afraid.


They just don't get nominated anymore, and when they did, the voters avoided them like the plague, and voted for five white acts and one black act on average every year, all of which came after the Beatles.


Which is why I'm protesting, because there are plenty of pre-Beatles' acts deserving of the R&RHoF honor.


And some of them are still alive!


Not that being alive is a requirement for the voters to induct you - see Chris Squire and Tupac Shakur for just two recent examples.


But, before I get to the prediction, let's clear up a few things.


By "pre-Beatles act", I mean an act that charted on a Billboard chart before the Beatles released "I Want To Hold Your Hand" in January, 1964.


No, I'm not counting "My Bonnie" by Tony Sheridan backed by the Beatles.


The other point I want to clear up is that I'm protesting all kinds of things about the R&RHoF voters, primarily.  They avoid inducting many black acts of all kinds, so I protest the voters not inducting black acts.  Kind of hard to question that when half the ballot are black acts every year, yet the voters inducted one black act to five white acts on average, but hey, other dudes prefer their opinions. . . .  I'm protesting the lack of alternative-related acts being inducted.  I'm protesting the lack of electronic dance music-related acts being inducted.  I'm protesting how few women are inducted, although they managed to gather their wits and induct Joan Baez last year, finally a good move on the voters part.  I used to protest the lack of British acts, but in 2015 they inducted Deep Purple and in 2016 they inducted Electric Light Orchestra and Yes, so the voters seem to have managed to improve on that front.  And I used to protest prog acts, but they've so vastly improved on that front, I'm expecting the Moody Blues any time now and hoping they'll actually get around to Jethro Tull and [gasp!] King Crimson.


But this year, because both the nomcom AND the voters have neglected pre-Beatles' acts, I'm protesting the lack of pre-Beatles' acts on the ballot, and I'm protesting that when they did get on the ballot, the voters decided neglecting the giants whose shoulders they stand on was a great idea. . . .


So, let's not be like that.  Let's instead honor those who came before and blaze the trails we so easily walk over now.  Let's go over some of these, shall we?


1.  Ivory Joe Hunter


So many artists have covered "Since I Met You Baby".  So many artist have covered "I Almost Lost My Mind".  And then there's "I Quit My Pretty Mama" or "It May Be Silly" or "I Need You So" or "Empty Arms". . . .  He was one of Elvis' favorite songwriters, even inviting him over to Graceland to discuss songs.  You don't find many songwriters who could write song after song that are immediately country, blues, jazz or R&B all at the same time.  This guy stands out from all the others.


2.  Johnny Burnette & the Rock 'N' Roll Trio


Through their versions of "The Train Kept A-Rollin'" and "Honey Hush", not to mention "Lonesome Tears In My Eyes" and "Tear It Up", they influenced everyone from Elvis Presley, who used to occasionally get on stage and sing with the band back in Memphis before he became famous, to British Invasion acts such as the Yardbirds, the Beatles and Ritchie Blackmore of Deep Purple, to the Burnette brothers writing songs for Rick Nelson and Dorsey Burnette writing "Magnificent Sanctuary Band" that Donny Hathaway picked up and many artists covered, to all the rockabilly revival acts from the 80s on. . . their influence is widespread, and it continues, and they deserve to be inducted.


3.  The Clovers


Harold Winley is still alive, so there is a chance to honor not only one of the best vocal groups, not only one of the most successful vocal groups, not only one of the most covered vocal groups (think "Hey, Miss Fannie", "One Mint Julep", "Your Cash Ain't Nothing But Trash" and, of course, "Love Potion No. 9"), but you could honor these guys while one of them somehow managed to stay alive this long.


4.  John Coltrane


My Favorite Things and A Love Supreme are stupendous albums from a stupendous jazz legend who was contemporary to rock, who deeply influenced rock and continues to be honored and admired up through today.  


5.  Nina Simone


How many acts have found heaven in the voice of Nina Simone?  How many acts have covered "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood", or "To Be Young, Gifted And Black"?  Nina Simone has given inspiration and influence to many acts, it is long past time for her to be honored by this Hall of Fame.


6.  Dick Dale


Talk about still being alive. . . the king of the surf guitar is still alive, still touring, still saying too much about his colostomy bag. . . still playing a guitar strung with piano strings, still playing way too loud, still wowing the audiences. . . and still talking about himself in third person. . . hey, metal, punk, alternative - whether they acknowledge him (many do) or not (some don't), they were influenced by the sound this man created from his guitar with lots of echo and lots of distortion.  Listen to "Let's Go Trippin'" and "Misirlou" to hear a lot of what came after.  


7.  Link Wray


He died only 12 years ago.  Okay, for a lot of people, that's half their lifetime ago, but even those 20 somethings revere the distortion heavy guitar work this man created, summed up in his first and biggest hit, "Rumble".  And, speaking of "Rumble", the title of that track is the title of a new documentary about the influence of Native Americans on rock history, and that documentary has stirred up a lot good will for Wray.  Of all the acts I've placed on this protest ballot, Link Wray probably has the best chance of actually winding up on this year's ballot.  If he does, it will be the second time around for him.


8.  Ben E. King, solo


Let's add another member to the Clyde McPhatter Club, that Club that consists of all the people who have been inducted into the R&RHoF more than once.  How about the guy who gave you the smash that we all know by heart, "Stand By Me"?  Sadly, he died only two years ago, but I still hope the R&RHoF will honor once again the man who gave us "Spanish Harlem", "I (Who Have Nothing)", "So Much Love", "Til I Can't Take It Anymore" and "Supernatural Thing".  He was in no way a one hit wonder when he was with the Drifters, and he was in no way a one hit wonder when he went solo.


9.  Merle Travis


What do James Burton, Duane Eddy, Link Wray, Lonnie Mack, Ben Sidran and Mark Knopfler, along with a slew of other guitarists, have in common?  Okay, they play guitar.  Duh.  What I'm talking about is all these guitarists took inspiration from all the albums that Merle Travis released AFTER his heyday.  Couple that with all the acts who covered Travis' hits from his heyday, and add on top of that how, if he didn't help create the first solid body electric guitar, he did help create one of the earliest solid body guitars, and this country artist made an indelible, intrinsic mark on rock history, making him deserving of induction.


10.  Esther Phillips


From the time that she sang all those #1 comic R&B hits with the Johnny Otis Orchestra as Little Esther all the way to her jazzy, sometimes disco albums in the 70s, Esther Phillips, with that unmistakable voice and phrasing could sing almost anything.  Anything.  She was such an inspiration that the nomcom nominated her in both the first year and the second year of the R&RHoF's existence, and it's high time to nominate her once more so she can exist along with her peers in the Hall of Fame.


11.  Dionne Warwick


Okay, I'm pushing things here.  Warwick's first hits, "Don't Make Me Over" and "Anyone Who Had A Heart", charted in 1963.  But even acts who started in 1963 who have not yet been inducted into the R&RHoF are being neglected, and few acts have had as many hits as Warwick.  At the time, her sound was considered chic and soulful, and there is no question that, even more than Dusty Springfield and Gene Pitney, Dionne Warwick was the muse for Bacharach and David.  Many artists have covered her songs and have found inspiration from her.  These days, people talk often about Janet Jackson or Whitney Houston, and deservedly so.  But both Jackson and the late Houston would testify to the influence of Warwick.  Warwick is still alive.


12.  Big Mama Thornton


Two words.  "Hound Dog".  Three more words.  "Ball & Chain".  Thornton was the teacher to many rock acts from Elvis Presley to Janis Joplin  to James Taylor (yes, he said so himself) to the late Amy Winehouse, and those particular two songs have been covered innumerable times such that they are indelibly etched into the vocal chords of rock and roll.  Most people would be surprised that she's not already in, so nominate and induct her already, please!


13.  The Spinners


Let's push things a little more.  Their first hit was in 1961 with "That's What Girls Are Made For", and although that's not one of the classic songs that people know them for, the fact that they go back that far seems to have lumped them into the same category as any other pre-Beatles' act despite their huge success in the 70s with songs with Bobbie Smith singing lead vocal and Phillipe Wynne singing lead (as in high) tenor (hey, Bill G, I'm helping to set that record straight!), not to forget Pervis Jackson on bass.  Did I mention Henry Fambrough is still alive?  With "I'll Be Around", "Could It Be I'm Falling In Love", "One Of A King", "Game People Play", "The Rubberband Man" and "Then Came You" with the above-mentioned Dionne Warwick, it's not hard to understand why the nomcom put them on the ballot three times already.  It is hard to understand why the voters passed them up all three of those times, though.


14.  Patsy Cline


Almost everything I said about Nina Simone, I could say about Patsy Cline, except Simone was a soulful, bluesy jazz while Cline was unabashedly country.  But what a voice!  And a voice that inspired so many rock acts through the decades since she died.  Why she isn't already inducted is something that can drive you "Crazy", I say. . . .okay, okay, don't "Fall To Pieces" on me. . . .


15.  Roy Brown


"Good Rockin' Tonight" was not first recorded by Elvis Presley, nor was it first recorded by Wynonie Harris, although the song was written for and offered to him first.  Roy Brown wrote the song, Roy Brown released it first, and Roy Brown is widely acknowledged as being the first singer to take the gospel sound and stamp it into a rhythm and blues song, a sacrilege in its day but the standard since then all the way through today.  Brown kept the hits rolling with "Long About Midnight", "Rockin' At Midnight", "Hard Luck Blues", "Love Don't Love Nobody", but if you want to hear how playfully raunchy Brown and his Mighty Mighty Men could be, listen to "Butcher Pete" parts one and two.  Great stuff.  Great artist.  Please get him inducted already.


16.  Sonny Boy Williamson


I'm talking about the second Sonny Boy Williamson - the first one is, without a doubt, an early influence on rock history, while the second one was its contemporary.  But whether he gave rock its "Eyesight For The Blind", "Don't Start Me Talkin'", "All My Love In Vain", "Your Funeral And My Trial" and so many more, Williamson has to be the only essential, through and through bluesman to not yet be inducted into the R&RHoF.  "Bring It On Home", R&RHoF, "Bring It On Home". . . .


17.  Chuck Willis


Aside from Chic, who still deserve to be nominated even though the R&RHoF inducted Nile Rodgers by himself, Chuck Willis has been nominated six times to Chic's eleven times, and neither have been inducted yet.  Willis sang and had a number of hits, including "C.C. Rider" (which gave him the title of the King of the Stroll) and "Hang Up My Rock & Roll Shoes", "It's Too Late", "Don't Deceive Me (Please Don't Baby)" and "You're Still My Baby", and he also wrote "Oh What A Dream" for Ruth Brown and "Close Your Eyes" for the Five Keys.  All of these songs have been covered numerous times.  It's no wonder the nomcom kept nominating him.


18.  The Shangri-Las


Shadow Morton should already have been inducted into the Musical Excellence category.  The Shangri-La's, the crown jewel of his career, should already have been inducted into the R&RHoF.  They have yet to be nominated.  "Leader Of The Pack", "Remember (Walking In The Sand)" and "Give Him A Great Big Kiss" have been covered many times, and their all leather, tough girl act set them apart from their contemporaries, influencing other rock acts through the years.  Mary and Betty Weiss are still alive.


19.  Lowell Fulson


"Tramp".  Otis Redding and Carla Thomas, right?  Well, Lowell Fulson wrote it, and Fulson recorded it first, and his version is just as great even though it's not as familiar.  But as many times as that song has been covered, Lowell Fulson also wrote, recorded first AND had the biggest hit with "Reconsider Baby", one of the most covered songs in rock history.  Fulson's range went from blues in the 50s to funky blues in the 70s (listen to "Bending Like A Willow Tree", which was covered by Albert Collins).  This great man deserves more recognition, more talk and an induction into the R&RHoF.


20.  The Marvelettes


Didn't necessarily placed them as a pre-Beatles' act, eh?  Well, they had 7 hits before 1964, and the Beatles did cover "Please, Mr. Postman", so of course they are a pre-Beatles' act.  And, despite being nominated twice, of course the voters didn't induct them.  Despite having often covered hits like "Beechwood 4-5789", "Too Many Fish In The Sea", "Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead", "Don't Mess With Bill" and "The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game".  Despite being one of the great Motown acts.  If they induct the Marvelettes, unlike with all the other acts I've listed here, there could be four living members showing up - Georgia Dobbins, Juanita Cowart, Katherine Anderson and Wanda Young Rogers - depending on who the R&RHoF decided would be inducted, a decision which lately seems to have more to do with the paranoia and incompetence surrounding the E Street Band induction than it does with obvious common sense.  But that's beside the point.  The Marvelettes are worthy.


21.  Billy Ward & The Dominoes


Talking about the Clyde McPhatter Club, how about we induct Clyde McPhatter one more time into the Clyde McPhatter club?  "Sixty Minute Man" should be the boast of every man (and Ruth Brown's "5-10-15 Hours" should be the reply of every woman. . .).  The Dominoes crossing over with the playfully raunchy "Sixty Minute Man" to reach #17 in prim and proper 1951 was unheard of, along with wonderful classics like "Do Something For Me", "That's What You're Doing For Me", "I'd Be Satisfied" and "Have Mercy Baby", not to forget Jackie Wilson on "Rags To Riches", and you have one of the best vocal groups sitting on the outside, despite having been nominated once.  Please put them in.


22.  Junior Parker


Junior Parker started as Little Junior Parker with a string of early rhythm and blues hits that, because times change and people forget their music history, people would mistakenly call them blues today - "Feelin' Good", "Next Time You See Me", "In The Dark", "Annie Get Your Yo-Yo", but, in particular, "Driving Wheel".  In the sixties, though, he would turn to funky soul, recording album after album that may not have set the charts of the day on fire, but went on to be influential among funk and rap acts ever since.  Please don't exclude Parker from the R&RHoF.


23.  Gene Chandler


Did you think I'd forget the Duke of Earl?  No, I would not forget the Duke of Earl.  With as many acts as he has personally touched, with as many acts as have covered his songs, with as many acts as he has collaborated with, why in the world has the R&RHoF neglected to add the Duke of Earl to its ranks of performer inductees?  I don't know, but I hope the nomcom and the voters would rectify this situation.  And they should do it now while Chandler is still alive.


Now, there are many, many more I could add to this list, just as you can add to this list.  I had an idea of making this list 75 acts long just recently just because.  But, in the end, I limited it to these 23 acts.  Either way, I feel very strongly that I've shown there are plenty of acts contemporary to rock and roll that came to the fore before the Beatles.  So, please, get the ball rolling again and start nominating these acts.  And hopefully the voters will also change their minds and start inducting these acts every now and then.


So, here's my protest ballot, a nominee ballot longer than all but the first two nominee ballots.  I hope the R&RHoF considers them when it's time to nominate and, if nominated, when it's time to induct.


Now, what are your predictions?
Last edited by Charles Crossley Jr on 01 Aug 2017, 12:00, edited 2 times in total.
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Bill G
Registered User
Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 01:25

01 Aug 2017, 08:01 #2

I am not optimistic .

 The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has , with the changes in the President/CEO, and the removal of the board members most likely to nominate Soul/R&B acts, Pre-Beatles acts, and women,  The "Hallowed Hall" will continue with it's 5 White Rockers/ 1 Rap act formula it has followed for the last several years.
 
Everybody has seen it, and anybody who has observed the HoF's actions over the last half-decade-plus is highly doubtful that things will change in 2018. The Hall of Fame is NOT FOOLING ANYBODY.
Sure, I'd like to see Janet, The Marvelettes, Mary Wells, The Spinners, Dionne Warwick, and Gene Chandler get in....
But , they're not Rappers, are they ?
Neither are The Commodores, Barry White, The Delfonics,The Whispers, The Manhattans, The Chi-Lites, Patti LaBelle & The Blue Belles/ LaBelle, The Pointer Sisters, Rick James & The Stone City Band, Jr Walker & The All-Stars, The Dramatics, The Stylistics,  or any of the other deserving R&B acts.
R&B , one of the most important progenitors of Rock and Roll, and the artists that make it, is being completely ignored , as if it NEVER EVEN EXISTED....
and the Hall of Fame is OK with that.
It has become, in essence, a RAWKERS' PARADISE.
...or should I say, "ROCKIST".
So, C'mon, Hall of Fame.
Prove me wrong .
Last edited by Bill G on 01 Aug 2017, 08:35, edited 7 times in total.
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Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 12:28 #3

Correction:  five white acts, and one BLACK act, not just rap, and it's an average, and this only concerns the performer category by the voters.  In fact, performers inducted by special committee, along with inductees by special committee into the Lifetime Achievement, Musical Excellence and Early Influence categories, seemed like attempts to counterbalance what the voters were doing with the performer category. 

And it's been going on starting with 2010's performers.


Let's write it out, shall we?


Acts inducted into the performer category by voters.


2010 - ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis, the Stooges and. . . Jimmy Cliff.
2011 - Alice Cooper, Dr. John, Neil Diamond, Tom Waits and. . . Darlene Love.
2012 - Laura Nyro, Beastie Boys, Donovan, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Faces/Small Faces and . . . the voters inducted no black acts as performers this year.  All the other acts inducted in 2012 were inducted by special committees.
2013 - Heart, Randy Newman, Rush and. . . Donna Summer, Albert King and Public Enemy.
2014 - Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates, KISS, Nirvana, Peter Gabriel and. . . Linda Ronstadt, who is Hispanic, not black, but at least this year wasn't all white.
2015 - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Green Day, Lou Reed, Stevie Ray Vaughan and . . . Bill Withers, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which was a mixed race act.
2016 - Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, Steve Miller (without his Band) and. . . N.W.A.
2017 - Joan Baez, Electric Light Orchestra, Journey, Pearl Jam, Yes and. . . 2Pac.


So, over the last 8 years, the voters inducted 35 white acts, 8 black acts, 1 mixed race act and 1 Hispanic act.


The precise ratio of voter-inducted white acts to black acts for the last eight years is 4.3 to 1.


This ratio persists despite each ballot pretty much being half white and half other ethnicities, mainly black.
Last edited by Charles Crossley Jr on 01 Aug 2017, 12:32, edited 1 time in total.
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Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 12:35 #4

[Grumble] Lesley Gore. . . Marty Robbins

. . . Rufus Thomas. . . Percy Mayfield. . .


[Grumble] Chubby Checker. . . The Chantels (nominated twice)


. . . Mississippi John Hurt. . .


[Sigh] . . .
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TrekkiELO
Registered User
Joined: 15 Feb 2004, 13:24

01 Aug 2017, 13:47 #5

Charles Crossley Jr wrote:
Correction:  five white acts, and one BLACK act, not just rap, and it's an average, and this only concerns the performer category by the voters.  In fact, performers inducted by special committee, along with inductees by special committee into the Lifetime Achievement, Musical Excellence and Early Influence categories, seemed like attempts to counterbalance what the voters were doing with the performer category. 

And it's been going on starting with 2010's performers.


Let's write it out, shall we?


Acts inducted into the performer category by voters.


2010 - ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis, the Stooges and. . . Jimmy Cliff.
2011 - Alice Cooper, Dr. John, Neil Diamond, Tom Waits and. . . Darlene Love.
2012 - Laura Nyro, Beastie Boys, Donovan, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Faces/Small Faces and . . . the voters inducted no black acts as performers this year.  All the other acts inducted in 2012 were inducted by special committees.
2013 - Heart, Randy Newman, Rush and. . . Donna Summer, Albert King and Public Enemy.
2014 - Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates, KISS, Nirvana, Peter Gabriel and. . . Linda Ronstadt, who is Hispanic, not black, but at least this year wasn't all white.
2015 - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Green Day, Lou Reed, Stevie Ray Vaughan and . . . Bill Withers, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which was a mixed race act.
2016 - Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, Steve Miller (without his Band) and. . . N.W.A.
2017 - Joan Baez, Electric Lynne (NOrchestra), Journey, Pearl Jam, Yes and. . . 2Pac.


So, over the last 8 years, the voters inducted 35 white acts, 8 black acts, 1 mixed race act and 1 Hispanic act.


The precise ratio of voter-inducted white acts to black acts for the last eight years is 4.3 to 1.


This ratio persists despite each ballot pretty much being half white and half other ethnicities, mainly black.

Corrected!
ImageImage
Rick Vendl II
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PopeCharming
Registered User
Joined: 17 Aug 2014, 21:14

01 Aug 2017, 13:50 #6

A very fun and informative protest prediction, Charles! Despite the fact that my list is actually trying to predict the nominees and yours is not, we still have four in common. Which four?  Well, I'm waiting until mid-August to announce my picks.

Maybe you've answered a question like this before, but what are your thoughts about a veterans' committee that might get to automatically induct a pre-Beatles act each year? As you note, the voting committee and the Nom Com must trend toward younger voters who weren't there in the 1950s and early 60s to listen to these acts.
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Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 15:23 #7

TrekkiELO wrote:
Charles Crossley Jr wrote:
Correction:  five white acts, and one BLACK act, not just rap, and it's an average, and this only concerns the performer category by the voters.  In fact, performers inducted by special committee, along with inductees by special committee into the Lifetime Achievement, Musical Excellence and Early Influence categories, seemed like attempts to counterbalance what the voters were doing with the performer category. 

And it's been going on starting with 2010's performers.


Let's write it out, shall we?


Acts inducted into the performer category by voters.


2010 - ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis, the Stooges and. . . Jimmy Cliff.
2011 - Alice Cooper, Dr. John, Neil Diamond, Tom Waits and. . . Darlene Love.
2012 - Laura Nyro, Beastie Boys, Donovan, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Faces/Small Faces and . . . the voters inducted no black acts as performers this year.  All the other acts inducted in 2012 were inducted by special committees.
2013 - Heart, Randy Newman, Rush and. . . Donna Summer, Albert King and Public Enemy.
2014 - Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates, KISS, Nirvana, Peter Gabriel and. . . Linda Ronstadt, who is Hispanic, not black, but at least this year wasn't all white.
2015 - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Green Day, Lou Reed, Stevie Ray Vaughan and . . . Bill Withers, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which was a mixed race act.
2016 - Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, Steve Miller (without his Band) and. . . N.W.A.
2017 - Joan Baez, Electric Lynne (NOrchestra), Journey, Pearl Jam, Yes and. . . 2Pac.


So, over the last 8 years, the voters inducted 35 white acts, 8 black acts, 1 mixed race act and 1 Hispanic act.


The precise ratio of voter-inducted white acts to black acts for the last eight years is 4.3 to 1.


This ratio persists despite each ballot pretty much being half white and half other ethnicities, mainly black.

Corrected!

ImageImage
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage


No wonder the R&RHoF simply lists them as ELO on their website.  They can't say "Orchestra" because there is "Norchestra"!
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Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 15:29 #8

PopeCharming wrote:
A very fun and informative protest prediction, Charles! Despite the fact that my list is actually trying to predict the nominees and yours is not, we still have four in common. Which four?  Well, I'm waiting until mid-August to announce my picks.

Maybe you've answered a question like this before, but what are your thoughts about a veterans' committee that might get to automatically induct a pre-Beatles act each year? As you note, the voting committee and the Nom Com must trend toward younger voters who weren't there in the 1950s and early 60s to listen to these acts.
You're scaring me, PC.  Like I wrote, last time I posted a protest prediction, I wound up with 5 right.  Now you're telling me at least four have a chance this time around. . . .

As for a veteran's committee, we Rock Hall watchers have suggested that a thousand times.  As an alternative, I suggested a split ballot, where the upper part is the usual post-Beatles acts from which five acts would be selected and the bottom part are pre-Beatles acts where one would be selected.  Someone suggested a special committee.  I suggested another alternative of having a yearly President's pick.


The veteran's committee is the popular suggestion, but whatever method is used, something needs to be done.


I just wish the voters would induct these groups every once in awhile when the nomcom puts them on the ballot.  I feel strongly that would be the best way.
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Charles Crossley Jr
Registered User
Joined: 07 Sep 2002, 09:13

01 Aug 2017, 15:34 #9

[Grumble] Mary Wells, nominated twice. . . Johnny Ace, nominated twice. . .

Conway Twitty with his rock single releases, nominated once. . . Charlie Rich with his rock single releases. . .


[Grumble] Huey Piano Smith And The Clowns. . .


Screamin' Jay Hawkins. . . Wynonie Harris. . . 


[Grumble] Sarah Vaughan . . . Merle Haggard. . .


Little Jimmy Scott. . .


[Sigh]
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TrekkiELO
Registered User
Joined: 15 Feb 2004, 13:24

01 Aug 2017, 17:29 #10

Charles Crossley Jr wrote:
TrekkiELO wrote:
Charles Crossley Jr wrote:
Correction:  five white acts, and one BLACK act, not just rap, and it's an average, and this only concerns the performer category by the voters.  In fact, performers inducted by special committee, along with inductees by special committee into the Lifetime Achievement, Musical Excellence and Early Influence categories, seemed like attempts to counterbalance what the voters were doing with the performer category. 

And it's been going on starting with 2010's performers.


Let's write it out, shall we?


Acts inducted into the performer category by voters.


2010 - ABBA, the Hollies, Genesis, the Stooges and. . . Jimmy Cliff.
2011 - Alice Cooper, Dr. John, Neil Diamond, Tom Waits and. . . Darlene Love.
2012 - Laura Nyro, Beastie Boys, Donovan, Guns N' Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Faces/Small Faces and . . . the voters inducted no black acts as performers this year.  All the other acts inducted in 2012 were inducted by special committees.
2013 - Heart, Randy Newman, Rush and. . . Donna Summer, Albert King and Public Enemy.
2014 - Cat Stevens, Hall & Oates, KISS, Nirvana, Peter Gabriel and. . . Linda Ronstadt, who is Hispanic, not black, but at least this year wasn't all white.
2015 - Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, Green Day, Lou Reed, Stevie Ray Vaughan and . . . Bill Withers, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, which was a mixed race act.
2016 - Cheap Trick, Chicago, Deep Purple, Steve Miller (without his Band) and. . . N.W.A.
2017 - Joan Baez, Electric Lynne (NOrchestra), Journey, Pearl Jam, Yes and. . . 2Pac.


So, over the last 8 years, the voters inducted 35 white acts, 8 black acts, 1 mixed race act and 1 Hispanic act.


The precise ratio of voter-inducted white acts to black acts for the last eight years is 4.3 to 1.


This ratio persists despite each ballot pretty much being half white and half other ethnicities, mainly black.

Corrected!

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No wonder the R&RHoF simply lists them as ELO on their website.  They can't say "Orchestra" because there is "Norchestra"!

Yes indeed, thanks Charles, LOL! Image Image


But the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame originally had Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) on their official nominee website, press release, ballot and fan poll, for some reason it got changed only after they made that SiriusXM VOLUME Channel live announcement as to who were 2017 Rock Hall inductees http://ourrockandrollhalloffame71305.yu ... eply-38003
Last edited by TrekkiELO on 01 Aug 2017, 22:19, edited 1 time in total.
Rick Vendl II
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