Buckethead?

Buckethead?

Joined: July 8th, 2010, 2:40 am

December 13th, 2010, 4:05 am #1

All things considered, I'd be shocked if George hadn't heard the name at least once, but then most people have know idea what Bucket is about.

For the better part of my life, I believed that there couldn't be a "Best" of anything with music, you can have a favorite band ever, but to call them the best is stupid.

Not because everyone has their own tastes, that's redundant, but because "Music" is just such a vague term. Maybe there is a best shredder ever, because that person is more technically proficient than anyone else, but to be the best bassist, guitarist, vocalist, drummer, whatever, is stupid, because they all have so much to them.

Buckethead changed that. First of all, he has an album release schedule to make Frank Zappa look lazy, Frank put out 62 albums between 1966 and 1993, average of just below 3 albums per year.

In 18 years, Buckethead has accomplished 37 solo records, between his actual solo releases, and his "Death Cube K" alternate solo records, along with 8 records with "Cornbugs" (Which he wrote all music for), A record and 2 demos with "Deli Creeps" (His original band), 9 albums with Viggo Mortensen, 10 Praxis records, as well as lead guitar contributions to 29 other albums, and significant contributions (Both lead guitar and composition) to the Frankenstein Monster (But surprisingly good) Chinese Democracy album (Grand total of 95 albums). There is also the matter of the "In Search of The" special release boxset, which contains 13 discs, so I'm not sure if I should count it as 1 album, or 13, so pick your poison, 96, or 108. There are several other multiple disc releases (I can think of two 5 disc sets and a 3 disc set that I've counted as a single release above) but those are clearly one album.

That's between 5.3 and 6 albums per year, depending on how I count ISOT

In addition, he has appeared as a guest on 52 records, as well as contributed to 13 film soundtracks, and 3 Film Scores, and 21 compilation albums. This is all readily available on wikipedia, but I feel like I should outline it to make a point of how prolific he is. For those keeping score at home, that's a total of 185 different albums featuring Buckethead.

But all of that is fairly useless if he's just rehashing the same shit again and again, and instead of going through and compiling all the various genres he's played, and arguing all that, I'll turn again to the magic of wikipedia, who lists the genres of Buckethead as
Avant-garde, avant-garde metal, noise rock, funk, funk rock, industrial metal, instrumental rock, progressive metal, heavy metal, progressive rock, experimental rock, funk metal, ambient, dark ambient, alternative metal, electronica, acoustic music, jazz fusion.

Again, useless if he just dabbles in a bunch of genres, but here's where opinion enters the picture, and that I believe Buckethead, when he plays something, be it rock, metal, funk, whatever, plays with absolute mastery. His Versatility, in my experience, is only matched by his mastery, but technical, and emotional.

Being that Buckethead plays mostly instrumental music, some people criticize him for "Wankery", or his music being "Heartless", but in his music, I can sense as close to the full range of human emotions as I think anyone has ever approached, not to mention the ingenuity in melodic content.

So, in summary, Buckethead releases a lot of music, not only does he release a lot of music, but he releases some of the most versatile and varied music, and he plays it as well as some who would spend their entire lives trying to achieve that level of mastery, both technical, and emotional, not a single note is wasted. Therefore I would make the case that Buckethead is the most talented human being to ever pick up the electric guitar.

Did I mention he also is proficient with nunchuks, and is rumored to be between 6'4" and 7'0" tall. Yeah. He's that awesome.


I honestly don't think George would ever embark on a quest this epic, to review Buckethead, but I've often contemplated dedicating a blog to reviewing his entire body of work.

Just some of his material.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVjxCitVL0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adV8-_hgL4g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHMcXmYYgw4
^played the first solo (The second is handled by Mr. Robin Finck)

(A note on Chinese Democracy, this was just as much a Buckethead album as an Axl Rose album, for a time, the drums were all recorded by Bryan Mantia, and the album had been mostly engineered by Dan Monti, both Buckethead veterans and close friends, Bucket was intended to have played lead guitar on every track, until his replacements demanded to be put on the album so that they would receive royalties)

and that's... that
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Joined: December 13th, 2006, 4:43 am

December 13th, 2010, 4:22 am #2

I like 'im (nt)
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:49 pm

December 13th, 2010, 11:39 pm #3

All things considered, I'd be shocked if George hadn't heard the name at least once, but then most people have know idea what Bucket is about.

For the better part of my life, I believed that there couldn't be a "Best" of anything with music, you can have a favorite band ever, but to call them the best is stupid.

Not because everyone has their own tastes, that's redundant, but because "Music" is just such a vague term. Maybe there is a best shredder ever, because that person is more technically proficient than anyone else, but to be the best bassist, guitarist, vocalist, drummer, whatever, is stupid, because they all have so much to them.

Buckethead changed that. First of all, he has an album release schedule to make Frank Zappa look lazy, Frank put out 62 albums between 1966 and 1993, average of just below 3 albums per year.

In 18 years, Buckethead has accomplished 37 solo records, between his actual solo releases, and his "Death Cube K" alternate solo records, along with 8 records with "Cornbugs" (Which he wrote all music for), A record and 2 demos with "Deli Creeps" (His original band), 9 albums with Viggo Mortensen, 10 Praxis records, as well as lead guitar contributions to 29 other albums, and significant contributions (Both lead guitar and composition) to the Frankenstein Monster (But surprisingly good) Chinese Democracy album (Grand total of 95 albums). There is also the matter of the "In Search of The" special release boxset, which contains 13 discs, so I'm not sure if I should count it as 1 album, or 13, so pick your poison, 96, or 108. There are several other multiple disc releases (I can think of two 5 disc sets and a 3 disc set that I've counted as a single release above) but those are clearly one album.

That's between 5.3 and 6 albums per year, depending on how I count ISOT

In addition, he has appeared as a guest on 52 records, as well as contributed to 13 film soundtracks, and 3 Film Scores, and 21 compilation albums. This is all readily available on wikipedia, but I feel like I should outline it to make a point of how prolific he is. For those keeping score at home, that's a total of 185 different albums featuring Buckethead.

But all of that is fairly useless if he's just rehashing the same shit again and again, and instead of going through and compiling all the various genres he's played, and arguing all that, I'll turn again to the magic of wikipedia, who lists the genres of Buckethead as
Avant-garde, avant-garde metal, noise rock, funk, funk rock, industrial metal, instrumental rock, progressive metal, heavy metal, progressive rock, experimental rock, funk metal, ambient, dark ambient, alternative metal, electronica, acoustic music, jazz fusion.

Again, useless if he just dabbles in a bunch of genres, but here's where opinion enters the picture, and that I believe Buckethead, when he plays something, be it rock, metal, funk, whatever, plays with absolute mastery. His Versatility, in my experience, is only matched by his mastery, but technical, and emotional.

Being that Buckethead plays mostly instrumental music, some people criticize him for "Wankery", or his music being "Heartless", but in his music, I can sense as close to the full range of human emotions as I think anyone has ever approached, not to mention the ingenuity in melodic content.

So, in summary, Buckethead releases a lot of music, not only does he release a lot of music, but he releases some of the most versatile and varied music, and he plays it as well as some who would spend their entire lives trying to achieve that level of mastery, both technical, and emotional, not a single note is wasted. Therefore I would make the case that Buckethead is the most talented human being to ever pick up the electric guitar.

Did I mention he also is proficient with nunchuks, and is rumored to be between 6'4" and 7'0" tall. Yeah. He's that awesome.


I honestly don't think George would ever embark on a quest this epic, to review Buckethead, but I've often contemplated dedicating a blog to reviewing his entire body of work.

Just some of his material.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVjxCitVL0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adV8-_hgL4g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHMcXmYYgw4
^played the first solo (The second is handled by Mr. Robin Finck)

(A note on Chinese Democracy, this was just as much a Buckethead album as an Axl Rose album, for a time, the drums were all recorded by Bryan Mantia, and the album had been mostly engineered by Dan Monti, both Buckethead veterans and close friends, Bucket was intended to have played lead guitar on every track, until his replacements demanded to be put on the album so that they would receive royalties)

and that's... that
And if that's Buckethead at his best I have little desire to hear anything else. I'll just sit back and admire his technical mastery from a distance.
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Joined: July 8th, 2010, 2:40 am

December 14th, 2010, 12:41 am #4

Not "As his best", but I think he was certainly the best player on that record, I'd love to hear a collaboration between Robin Finck and Buckethead, but from reports, they didn't get on well, or at least, Finck was uncomfortable around Bucket they'd sit in practice and keep trying to outdo eachother with more and more absurd solos (Think Steve Vai's Zappa audition). The best contrast of Bucket's abilities is that he played the entire guitar track of "Sorry" and the acoustic guitar on "If the World".

But I have to REALLY disagree about Chinese Democracy, the melodies are brilliant, Axl sounds incredible, the orchestration is top knotch, and the cast of guitarists is one of the best ever assembled, and it's produced with absolute precision. I MUCH prefer songs like Madagascar, There was a Time, and Prostitute to anything old GNR did. I don't think I've ever heard a solo in mainstream rock and roll quite as epic as the one that closes "There was a Time"

Last edited by Daggor on December 14th, 2010, 12:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 13th, 2006, 4:43 am

December 15th, 2010, 6:05 am #5

And if that's Buckethead at his best I have little desire to hear anything else. I'll just sit back and admire his technical mastery from a distance.
What's there not to like about it?
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Joined: July 8th, 2010, 2:40 am

December 16th, 2010, 1:25 am #6

of Chinese Democracy was comically terrible. He doesn't mention Buckethead once, and forgets to mention the fact that addition to being on a Primus Record, Brain was on like 20 Buckethead projects.

Allow me to summarize.

"This record sucks because GNR fans reading this review hate it and I haven't heard of these musicians"
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Joined: June 22nd, 2005, 5:49 pm

December 16th, 2010, 5:27 am #7

So what if Prindle didn't know anything about Buckethead? If he thought the guitar work was good he would have mentioned it. If Buckethead was so good on the album wouldn't his guitar playing have stood out, even to someone who was unfamiliar with him?
I think you're biased in favour of Buckethead. So you are more likely to hear his contributions and consider them to be positive. No shame in that, I have that with many musicians/songwriters too.

Your summary doesn't work at all btw, Prindle also wrote: "The result is an epic bombastic presentation of simplistic, predictable crap songs buried under five trillion instrumental overdubs. The bulk is comprised of rotten piano ballads, faceless heavy metal chord progressions, and rank funk rockers -- every one dragged out to interminable length through multiple guitar solos and endless repetitions of anthemic Linkin Parky choruses."
That right there is a very solid description of why it's a bad album.
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Joined: July 8th, 2010, 2:40 am

December 16th, 2010, 6:29 pm #8

On the credits, Buckethead was listed as second behind Axl Rose. Prindle dedicated a significant portion of his review to how Axl hadn't gotten anyone "Noteworthy" to play on the record, at the very least, he certainly didn't do his research. Or if he did, conveniently ignored information that contradicted his argument. When you're referring to Brain as the "One Time Primus Drummer", it's like referring to Ian Gillan as the "One Time Black Sabbath singer", or Gus G as the "One Time Ozzy Osborne Guitarist", it looks unprofessional because either A. You did virtually no research, or B. You did research, but ignored their entire body of work.
Last edited by Daggor on December 16th, 2010, 6:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 8th, 2010, 2:40 am

January 13th, 2011, 2:34 am #9

All things considered, I'd be shocked if George hadn't heard the name at least once, but then most people have know idea what Bucket is about.

For the better part of my life, I believed that there couldn't be a "Best" of anything with music, you can have a favorite band ever, but to call them the best is stupid.

Not because everyone has their own tastes, that's redundant, but because "Music" is just such a vague term. Maybe there is a best shredder ever, because that person is more technically proficient than anyone else, but to be the best bassist, guitarist, vocalist, drummer, whatever, is stupid, because they all have so much to them.

Buckethead changed that. First of all, he has an album release schedule to make Frank Zappa look lazy, Frank put out 62 albums between 1966 and 1993, average of just below 3 albums per year.

In 18 years, Buckethead has accomplished 37 solo records, between his actual solo releases, and his "Death Cube K" alternate solo records, along with 8 records with "Cornbugs" (Which he wrote all music for), A record and 2 demos with "Deli Creeps" (His original band), 9 albums with Viggo Mortensen, 10 Praxis records, as well as lead guitar contributions to 29 other albums, and significant contributions (Both lead guitar and composition) to the Frankenstein Monster (But surprisingly good) Chinese Democracy album (Grand total of 95 albums). There is also the matter of the "In Search of The" special release boxset, which contains 13 discs, so I'm not sure if I should count it as 1 album, or 13, so pick your poison, 96, or 108. There are several other multiple disc releases (I can think of two 5 disc sets and a 3 disc set that I've counted as a single release above) but those are clearly one album.

That's between 5.3 and 6 albums per year, depending on how I count ISOT

In addition, he has appeared as a guest on 52 records, as well as contributed to 13 film soundtracks, and 3 Film Scores, and 21 compilation albums. This is all readily available on wikipedia, but I feel like I should outline it to make a point of how prolific he is. For those keeping score at home, that's a total of 185 different albums featuring Buckethead.

But all of that is fairly useless if he's just rehashing the same shit again and again, and instead of going through and compiling all the various genres he's played, and arguing all that, I'll turn again to the magic of wikipedia, who lists the genres of Buckethead as
Avant-garde, avant-garde metal, noise rock, funk, funk rock, industrial metal, instrumental rock, progressive metal, heavy metal, progressive rock, experimental rock, funk metal, ambient, dark ambient, alternative metal, electronica, acoustic music, jazz fusion.

Again, useless if he just dabbles in a bunch of genres, but here's where opinion enters the picture, and that I believe Buckethead, when he plays something, be it rock, metal, funk, whatever, plays with absolute mastery. His Versatility, in my experience, is only matched by his mastery, but technical, and emotional.

Being that Buckethead plays mostly instrumental music, some people criticize him for "Wankery", or his music being "Heartless", but in his music, I can sense as close to the full range of human emotions as I think anyone has ever approached, not to mention the ingenuity in melodic content.

So, in summary, Buckethead releases a lot of music, not only does he release a lot of music, but he releases some of the most versatile and varied music, and he plays it as well as some who would spend their entire lives trying to achieve that level of mastery, both technical, and emotional, not a single note is wasted. Therefore I would make the case that Buckethead is the most talented human being to ever pick up the electric guitar.

Did I mention he also is proficient with nunchuks, and is rumored to be between 6'4" and 7'0" tall. Yeah. He's that awesome.


I honestly don't think George would ever embark on a quest this epic, to review Buckethead, but I've often contemplated dedicating a blog to reviewing his entire body of work.

Just some of his material.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mVjxCitVL0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adV8-_hgL4g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHMcXmYYgw4
^played the first solo (The second is handled by Mr. Robin Finck)

(A note on Chinese Democracy, this was just as much a Buckethead album as an Axl Rose album, for a time, the drums were all recorded by Bryan Mantia, and the album had been mostly engineered by Dan Monti, both Buckethead veterans and close friends, Bucket was intended to have played lead guitar on every track, until his replacements demanded to be put on the album so that they would receive royalties)

and that's... that
Just found out that he managed to put out a fourth solo album in 2010, some sort of happy holidays release, although its certainly not Christmas music, his total on the year is 4 solo releases, and 8 additional discs with Brain and Melissa Reese in 2 releases (5 disc and 3 disc). And then 1 other collaboration with Brain, and one with Travis Dickerson.

The new lead tone is beautiful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gG0oQm- ... re=related
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