Concerts

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bc gal
G3 Curtain and Duvet!
G3 Curtain and Duvet!
bc gal
G3 Curtain and Duvet!
G3 Curtain and Duvet!
Joined: May 29th, 2006, 2:09 am

July 16th, 2006, 4:38 am #11

richard wrote:Thanks ever so much, bc gal for the review which is certainly accurate from the 'Maid of Constant Sorrow' album which I have. What was interesting was that Judy Collins performed this material and from what she said to the audience, how rooted is her knowledge of folk music. She explained that American folk music and UK folk music have a common ancestry depending on how the people travelled.
Hey, Richard...
You must go out(if you have not already) and rent, buy, or borrow the movie "Songcatcher" previously mentioned. Its storyline is centered around this music professor who travels to the Appalachians to capture (write down and record) the mountain tunes back in the early 20th century. She discovers that alot of the tunes originated from English, Scotch-Irish settlers...exactly as our lovely JC stated. I am sure you will enjoy it.
"Save the Earth... it's the only planet with chocolate!!!!"
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richard
The Garden Assistant
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Joined: May 31st, 2006, 6:22 am

July 16th, 2006, 4:23 pm #12

I'll certainly take your tip, bc gal, when I'm not so short of money.
By the way, I flipped on the TV at random and saw a real treat for the senses of Carole King performing in a series called 'In Concert.' The format of the programme, made in the 1970s is a real treat for the senses, no showbiz introductions, no overdone glittery presentation but just a plain and simple production.
She largely performed the songs off the well known 'Tapestry' album with the addition of 'Up on the Roof' and it was brilliant. It showcased her very soulful voice and piano playing to perfection with a shifting cast of a few backup musicians (including James Taylor for one song). This is an album that I've heard a long time ago and the performance reminded me just how good it is.
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Sarah Harding Is A Babe
Down the Block
Down the Block
Joined: April 22nd, 2007, 10:30 am

May 1st, 2007, 8:22 pm #13

Going seeing Girls Aloud this month, as 30 yes im a bit old but Sarah Harding is amazing
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Joined: May 23rd, 2007, 5:27 am

June 29th, 2007, 3:10 pm #14

Pink is comming to SA in Sept...

I can't wait!!!!

?For it was not into my ear you whispered but into my heart. It was not my lips you kissed, but my soul.? Judy Garland

Ste ovde, Ja to znam
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Baileysqueen
Out of Dorm
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Baileysqueen
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Joined: January 15th, 2007, 2:20 am

January 11th, 2008, 11:52 pm #15

I dont know if anyone is interested i just noticed this thread. But UH HUR HER, which is the band liesha Hailey from The L word (alice) performs is coming to the shepards bush empire in london on the 3rd of March. I cant really aford the tirp to london and back, but any L Word fans out there might be interested!

x










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richard
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richard
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Joined: May 31st, 2006, 6:22 am

January 26th, 2008, 10:14 am #16

I had the real pleasure of seeing Tom Paxton in concert in Sheffield last week. He is one of the group of 1960s American folk singers who hung out in Greenwich Village and their scene created a wave of socially committed writing whose outward ripples are not lost to today's generation. (Bob Dylan is the best known member of that group)

He was accompanied by another guy on mandolin, second guitar which nicely fleshed out the melodies. The guy had a real humanity and wit in his music, ranging from touching songs about his two daughters to a standout song 'Comedians and Angels' being his retrospective of his roots in New York. His talk in between songs was similarly pitched, with nice self deprecating humour of the help he needs from his grandson to load stuff up on his website from a guy who was brought up on the radio. Back in 1965 he wrote a song called 'Lyndon Johnson told the Nation' about the Vietnam war. His rewite 'George W told the Nation' fits in seamlessly to modern times

"I got a letter from old George W.,
It said, "Son, I hate to trouble ya,
But this war of mine is going bad.
It's time for me to roll the dice;
I know you've already been there twice,
But I am sending you back to Baghdad."

Chorus:
Hey! George W. told the nation,
"This is not an escalation;
This is just a surge toward victory.
Just to win my little war,
I'm sending 20,000 more,
To help me save Iraq from Iraqis.

And, so, I made it to Iraq
In time for one more sneak attack,
And to my old battalion I was sent.
We drive around in our Humvees,
Listening to The Black-Eyed Peas
And speaking fondly of the president. (To Chorus)

Celebrities all come to see us,
Grateful they don't have to be us,
Politicians show their best face card.
Where is Bubba? Where's our leader?
Where's our favorite lip reader?
AWOL from the Texas National Guard."

Of course, I could add Dylan's 'Masters of War' and the late Phil Ochs *an all time hero of mine) 'Cops of the World' and 'I ain't Marching anymore' to this list of songs with modern resonance.

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