Joined: January 5th, 2008, 5:34 am

February 25th, 2009, 9:48 pm #11

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

Love the "whole box" story, David. I received a whole box of '74 Topps as a First Communion present and felt like I was (ahem) in heaven.
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Joined: February 25th, 2007, 3:32 am

February 26th, 2009, 8:27 am #12

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.



we've been together for almost 50 years!

it was late in the fall of 1959 & i had been recently indoctorinated to the world of sports by virtue of the hometown dodgers' world series victory over the chicago white sox. one afternoon, as i was walking out of wally's pharmacy on fair oaks ave in altadena, ca, i noticed a small picture card resting, scuffed & beaten near the curb... it was a "trading" card of paul hornung. and altho i had NO idea whatsoever who this guy or his team was (the green bay packers?), i captured the card, the card captured my heart, and a lifelong bond was immediately forged!
before long i had discovered the la rams & was purchasing cello packs of 1959 topps football as often as my 10 cent weekly allowance permitted... which was once a week!

it was the following spring however, that i discovered my lasting passion and can remember buying one 1960 topps baseball wax pack for a nickel at wally's then walking up fair oaks to the corner store/soda fountain & spending the other nickel from my allowance on a wax pack of 1960 fleer all-time greats... 12 cards that entertained & educated me for an entire week while bridging the historical gap between babe ruth, ty cobb & cy young and willie mays, mickey mantle & sandy koufax! ahhh... those certainly WERE the days!

still have that '59 topps hornung & altho it would only grade poor to fair, it is safely stored in a card saver & treated like a treasure... as it's sentimental value to me belies it's collectible value (or lack thereof) to anyone else.
but, isn't that what collecting is really about?
Last edited by sando69 on March 15th, 2009, 4:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 6th, 2005, 9:38 pm

February 26th, 2009, 9:00 am #13

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

I opened up the Red-White-Blue LEAF packs in 1949 to find Babe Ruth's, Joe DiMaggio's, Ted Williams', Stan Musial's,
Jackie Robinson's....and, many more clorful BB cards of my favorite players.


.......................1949 Bowman....................................................1949 Leaf




TED Z

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Joined: July 30th, 2004, 2:01 am

February 26th, 2009, 1:09 pm #14

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

In the spring of 1970, when I was nine, my mom sent me to the grocery store to buy some broccoli. For reasons I have never been able to explain, I spent the money on baseball cards. As I was walking home, my dad drove by and picked me up. I explained to him what happened and he took it in stride, driving back to the grocery store, where he bought some broccoli and some more baseball cards. These were 1970 Topps cards, and I recall the posters that came with them. Ollie Brown was in the first pack and Willie Davis was in the second. I was hooked then and I still am ...
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Joined: June 18th, 2007, 6:34 pm

February 26th, 2009, 5:00 pm #15

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

I've told this story before, but here goes. As a little kid we lived in NYC. (I'm talking late 1950's to mid 1960's.) My Dad worked for the A&P Grocery chain, in their Brooklyn plant in the old Bush Terminal. He was the Superintendent of Shipping and Receiving. One of his duties was to co-ordinate the trash pick up at the plant. This put him in contact with the trash hauler who also handled the Topps plant nearby. Knowing that my Dad had 2 sons, he would often drop off uncut sheets that Topps was throwing out for some reason.

My older brother and I would spend many nights at the kitchen table cutting all these sheets into cards, with scissors. I'm not talking about a sheet or two. I'm talking hundreds of sheets per year.

Of course, at the time, sheets had no value, but cards were still cards.
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Joined: July 5th, 2008, 2:19 am

February 26th, 2009, 9:55 pm #16

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

First card memory:

Seeing several neighborhood kids trading '49 Leafs, including Babe Ruth. Since I was only seven, and had no ATM card, all I could do was watch (and wonder why anybody would want a card of a guy who hadn't played ball in years!)

Best card memory:

In those years, boys and girls, cards came out in series. What would prove to be the last series of '53 Topps never got to my little town. But a friend had found a pack in a larger burg nearby. For my birthday, my dad drove me there, and we bought a BOX of them. WOW!!! I was in heaven on the way home, mainly because there were so many Pirates, and, oh yeah, Willie Mays. And yes, I still have every one. In sheets.
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Joined: June 26th, 2006, 5:05 pm

February 27th, 2009, 12:04 am #17

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

It was around March 1982. A cousin of mine had started collecting cards in 1981. He came down and mentioned to me and another cousin of ours that we should start collecting cards so we could trade around. Sooooooo.....I went home and asked my older brother if he had ever collected. he said that he had some in his room in a drawer, to go look. I went in there and......1975 and 1976 Topps cards including a 1975 Munson and Frank Robinson. I then started stopping every day after school to get my 30 cent pack of Topps, Donruss or Fleer. The rest is history........(I remember getting Football cards and Hockey cards back in those years---1981s and 1982s.....we used to "flip" the football cards....we had probably 20-25 Montana Rookies between us.....all with dinged up corners....I remember having a 5000 ct box of football at one one time from years 1981-1986......there was like 10-15 each of Montana, Elway, Marino and Rice RCs.....sold the whole box for like $50 bucks........not to mention the Gretzky cards)
Last edited by wolfdogg on February 27th, 2009, 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 16th, 2008, 10:17 pm

February 27th, 2009, 12:13 am #18

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

So Jim, do you remember the earliest sheet you ever got to cut up? Was it only baseball, or did you get to cut up other sports and non-sports? Wow, that had to be quite a treat as a kid! I'm jealous. My earliest baseball card memory is getting the game cards out of the 1968 Topps. It's funny, I don't remember the cards themselves, but there was just something about those game cards... And my earliest card memory is the 1966 Batman. We all loved Batman as kid. Sorry, even before we liked baseball!
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Joined: June 18th, 2007, 6:34 pm

February 27th, 2009, 1:39 am #19

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

I was born in 1955, so I don't remember much of the early years of cutting. My brother was born in 1946, so he was the chief culprit in the 1956-1961 range. I do remember cutting the 1962's with that wood grain edging. Then, suddenly, around 1965, our supply dried up and I never knew why. At that same time, the A&P was consolidating 3 plants into a new facility upstate NY and we moved. Until recently I always assumed that was the reason for no more free cards. Years later, I found that was when Topps had moved their printing to Duryea, PA.

I don't remember cutting anything other than baseball, but I could be wrong.
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

February 28th, 2009, 10:24 pm #20

For me, it was opening packs of 1973 Topps, purchased from the concession stand at Pee Wee Park, the little league field in Bowling Green, Ohio. I remember how the wax paper felt, how the gum smelled, and how much of a bummer it was to realize, the following spring, how "old-fashioned" my stack of about 200 cards had suddenly become.

My first baseball card memories are cutting out the cards off of boxes of HoHo's and Twinkies....I also recall getting the 3D cards out of Frosted Flakes. I'm not sure which of those events took place first, but I can distinctly recall both of them. I'm pretty sure my first pack of cards I bought was 1975. I remember a kid coming to school with a small stack of the colorful 75's and thinking they were about the coolest things I'd ever seen.
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