Who is the Real Father of Baseball?

Joined: October 1st, 2007, 2:59 pm

December 19th, 2007, 4:04 pm #31

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Barry, you mention that Mrs. Spalding and Mrs. Doubleday knew each other at least through Madame Blavatsky. Has there ever been any mention as to why Doubleday's widow went along with the Mills Commission report? She had to know that it was nonsense.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 19th, 2007, 4:44 pm #32

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I was going to add something to this thread but I didn't have anything worthwhile to add. With that being said I vote for Harry Wright being the Father of Baseball....as I have a card of him. It's always about "me" ....
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 5:30 pm #33

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Leon- that's the best reason yet.

Tom- I don't know when Mrs. Doubleday died; it's possible it occurred before 1905. I really should read that chapter again, as there are many details I'm sure I've forgotten.
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Joined: February 13th, 2006, 1:34 am

December 19th, 2007, 5:57 pm #34

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
It has to be Harry Wright otherwise Barry would have to change his ebay handle to alexandercartwright
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 19th, 2007, 6:14 pm #35

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Heh! I've always kind of liked AJC and we share a birthday too...I wanted to name my kid AJ Cartwright Bretta, but my wife nixed it (she nixed all baseball related names ). Imagine if she'd let me and documents were uncovered that showed he had ZERO to do with the formation of the modern game's rules. Would I have gotten a do over?

You think there were baseball fans that named their kid Abner because of their love for baseball?
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 6:18 pm #36

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Steve is right- my ebay handle is in honor of my favorite 19th century baseball figure.
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Joined: January 3rd, 2006, 8:03 pm

December 19th, 2007, 7:30 pm #37

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I'm with Leon on this one because I don't have a Cartwright card.


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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 7:59 pm #38

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
You know, when I wrote articles on a regular basis for VCBC, I checklisted all the known photographs of Cartwright, Chadwick, and Wright, and clearly Harry Wright had far more known than the other two.

Unfortunately, that article appeared in issue #7, the one that turns out to be the hardest to find.
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Joined: March 24th, 2007, 5:15 pm

December 20th, 2007, 4:15 am #39

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Dan,

I like your theory about why the Hall named the ballfield after Doubleday - to keep the Spalding people happy. But what I have never understood, is why the opening of the Hall to commemorate the centennial of the Game's invention occurred in 1939 (the Doubleday myth stems from 1839)? And furthermore, if they were still intent on sticking with this story, why wasn't Doubleday inducted? I realize they had already inducted 3 classes starting in 1936, and maybe it just took three years to complete the process - which coincidently corresponded to the centennial of the myth. Does anyone know when the Doubleday story began to fall out of favor with true baseball historians? Nice thread.

Ken
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 20th, 2007, 4:31 am #40

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I think the Doubleday myth has been widely known as a myth amongst baseball historians for a very long time...and true historians of the game never accepted the Mills Commission findings. There are no known documents where Doubleday even mentions baseball...he was nowhere near Cooperstown in 1839, he was at West Point and the only testimony came from someone who was only 5 years old in 1839...who actually went on to murder his wife. Not a very credible witness. A 1911 Encyclopedia article on Doubleday doesn't even mention baseball so it's evident that historians didn't buy into Spalding's ruse.
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