Who is the Real Father of Baseball?

Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 19th, 2007, 1:33 am #21

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I've always had a passing interest in the origins of the game, and I accept that it was a game that evolved out of perhaps many different childhood games so it doesn't really rile me up too much, but Spalding's rigging the origins kind of riles me up a bit. I still think an essential pull to the romance of baseball is that it's true origins still remain shrouded in mystery.
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 1:43 am #22

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
That's a fair point. We may never know the true origin of the game, but there is no way we can condone what Spalding did.
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Joined: November 6th, 2004, 12:48 am

December 19th, 2007, 1:51 am #23

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I would vote for Chadwick. His popularity and standing as a pioneer even in his day can not be overlooked. I think if you could go back in time and ask Harry Wright who he thought was the father of baseball, he would probably give the nod to Chadwick.

Basically there is no right or wrong answer, its like asking who invented a specific pitch; It always can be traced back one step further. However, I think Chadwick did the most over the longest period of time spanning the earliest days of pre-professionalism to the days when the modern game was firmly in place.

Rhys Yeakley
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 19th, 2007, 1:52 am #24

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
He (Spalding) definitely muddied the water, but I don't know, did he destroy anything document wise that may have pointed to something solid? I doubt it.

edited to add: (Spalding) in my response.
Last edited by slidekellyslide on December 19th, 2007, 1:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 2:12 am #25

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
One thing about Spalding and Doubleday that David Block discussed in his book (in a chapter written by David's brother Philip) is that when the Mills Commission published its results in 1905, the two were not strangers.

In the late 19th century Albert Spalding vacationed in the Point Loma section of San Diego (for point of reference, both Don Larsen and David Wells went to Point Loma High School), and his wife attended some spiritual meetings led by Madame Blavatsky, a well known 19th century psychic. Well guess who else attended those meetings- Mrs. Abner Doubleday! So it's reasonable to believe that both Albert and Abner knew each other and were acquaintences years before Doubleday was anointed the inventor of baseball.

Is it possible that the two had a clandestine meeting, and agreed to this whole charade beforehand? Who knows. But it's an amazing fact that has only been recently uncovered.

(and not that it matters, but my oldest friend lives in Point Loma and I have visited it many times- a beautiful place indeed!)

Edited to add Doubleday died in 1893, so let me rephrase my hypothesis- is it possible that when the Mills Commission was looking for the game's inventor, Spalding was well acquainted with Doubleday, and while he knew that Doubleday had nothing to do with the game, felt he would be the perfect person to fill the role? However it worked out, they already knew each other.
Last edited by barrysloate on December 19th, 2007, 2:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 19th, 2007, 2:35 am #26

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Spalding was a sneaky bastard... Getting John Ward out of the country with him in 1888 on his World Tour while John Brush was instituting the player classification system.
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Joined: October 12th, 2004, 1:47 pm

December 19th, 2007, 4:33 am #27

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
My vote is Cartwright. He was the "voice" of the formulating group.

I also say that, if it wasn't for the civil war, baseball today may have been no more popular than lacrosse or, at the least, baseball today would be about 50 years behind where it is now.

Rob M.
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 12:10 pm #28

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
Maybe in the end we should just say the Founding Fathers of the game were the esteemed members of the Knickerbockers, among them Alexander Cartwright, who jointly codified the rules of baseball and laid the groundwork for our national pastime.
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Joined: December 13th, 2004, 5:18 am

December 19th, 2007, 2:47 pm #29

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I think you're right Barry...and thanks for starting this thread. I learned a lot.
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

December 19th, 2007, 3:39 pm #30

Okay, here is a topic just for fun:

Alexander Cartwright, Henry Chadwick, and Harry Wright have all at one time been called "the Father of Baseball." But we can all have only one daddy. So who is best deserving that title?

I think it is Harry Wright. Wright was a player starting in the late 1850's; in 1869 he formed the first professional baseball team, which changed the face of the game forever; when the National Association was formed, he managed the finest franchise in the league and won four championships (1872-75); when the National League was formed he managed Boston, Providence, and Philadelphia for nearly twenty years; and he copiously kept acccurate records of nearly every aspect of the professional game, best illustrated in the yearly scorebooks he preserved for close to fifteen years.

Any other differing opinions?
I was hoping we would have a stimulating discussion, which we did...but did you happen to notice how few people actually chimed in?
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