There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

Joined: May 14th, 2005, 7:03 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 5:08 pm #1



For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
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Joined: November 9th, 2007, 11:01 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 5:32 pm #2

I wish I bought these back in 1975.
http://bid.robertedwardauctions.com/lot ... w=1&auc=15
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

April 23rd, 2009, 5:46 pm #3


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
I guess PSA should be expecting about 100,000 Topps Minis submitted in the near future.
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Joined: November 28th, 2006, 6:30 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 6:06 pm #4


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
The article does not address 1960s and 1970s cards.

Adjusted for inflation (using the article's 1989 benchmark), I suspect 1960s and 1970s HOFers have not appreciated much, but have fared much better than 1980s stuff.
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 12:27 am

April 23rd, 2009, 7:00 pm #5


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
I bought a really nice 1933 Goudey Grove at a show in Manhattan in March 1989. It cost me about $225, and for a 16 year old kid was about all I could afford to spend on a baseball card back then. About 15 years later, I had it graded by SGC and it came back a 60. That card in that condition just sold for about $350 on ebay. So while I am happy that there was an appreciation in value there -- as opposed to my collection of 1980s and 1990s Topps cards -- mid-grade Goudeys have only somewhat appreciated since the late 1980s.

Similarly, I bought a beautiful T206 Bender Portrait in 1997 for about $150. The card later graded an SGC 50 and is not worth much more than what I paid for it. The $350 I put on a Matty White Cap that came back an SGC 60 on the same day is a different story, as that card has basically tripled in value.

All I'm saying is that there is some luck involved and it is not as simple as just picking card collecting eras.

_ </u> _ <u> _ </u> _ <u> _ </u> _ <u> _ _

Visithttp://www.t206collector.com for Net54 T206 archive, signed deadball card galleries, articles and more!
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Joined: May 1st, 2008, 8:14 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 7:06 pm #6


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
I remember buying a beautiful Hal Chase Port Blue Background. The dealer advertised it as Nr-Mt and when I got it I didn't think otherwise.

Of course, years later I got it graded and it was only a 5 and I didn't make much on that purchase.

I was really confused about grading after all the years of dealers saying their cards were Mint+ and learning what grades cards really were.
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Joined: October 11th, 2004, 4:37 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 8:21 pm #7


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
Any card being bought and sold in 100 or 1,000 card bricks of identical top condition items wasn't destined to pay for the kids' college tuition through long term appreciation. That was apparent in 1989 and it is playing out now. Plenty of people made tons of money on modern cards; they just had to time it right. It was pure casino capitalism, the poor man's penny stocks.

Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc
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Joined: October 19th, 2004, 12:02 am

April 23rd, 2009, 8:45 pm #8


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
I bought 100 Dave Magadan rookies in 1987. I plan to sell them and use the proceeds for my retirement.
Last edited by barrysloate on April 23rd, 2009, 8:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 28th, 2003, 11:26 pm

April 23rd, 2009, 8:49 pm #9


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
Barry I would never tell someone how to spend his money but when you sell those cards this might be something you would want to look at...

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Joined: May 27th, 2002, 8:15 am

April 23rd, 2009, 8:51 pm #10


For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html
Those 500 and 1000 card brick of rookie cards are great for wallpaper...I'm still trying to decide between Pete Incaviglia and Kal Daniels to do the upstairs bathroom.
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