Exciting New Discovery: Archibald "Moonlight" Graham item (Field of Dreams)

Exciting New Discovery: Archibald "Moonlight" Graham item (Field of Dreams)

Joined: February 7th, 2004, 1:48 am

July 5th, 2008, 7:29 pm #1

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
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Joined: September 17th, 2001, 5:28 pm

July 5th, 2008, 7:35 pm #2

That's incredibly cool. Thanks for sharing. He looks nothing like Burt Lancaster.
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Joined: October 11th, 2004, 4:37 pm

July 5th, 2008, 7:37 pm #3

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Nice to see something not related to money on here. Old Doc Graham must be looking down today pleased as can be that he is remembered by baseball fans who never even met him.

Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc
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Joined: November 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm

July 5th, 2008, 7:47 pm #4

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Oddly enough, his signature brings incredible money. Although he died in 1965, there are precious few holographic examples in existence. I understand that Kinsella (and Lancaster) created an endearing character, but to me it's silly to base memorabilia value on a fictitious persona, even if some of the facts are indeed true. Then again, there would be no market for items dealing with Calamity Jane and other historical figures whose legends are mired in falsehood if this were the case.
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Joined: February 7th, 2004, 1:48 am

July 5th, 2008, 7:59 pm #5

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Jodi, to be honest I don't find it odd in the least bit. History (and certainly baseball history) is full of similar examples. Does it really make sense that people collect and pay thousands on players like Fred McMullin, Hap Felsh, Swede Risberg, etc? Maybe not to some, but they are novelties in and of themselves. I for one would rather have his signature than 50 other players who had similar death dates but wouldn't mean that much to me. To each his own I guess.
-Rhett
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Joined: October 11th, 2004, 4:37 pm

July 5th, 2008, 8:03 pm #6

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
I think part of the allure of autographs of historical figures, even historical figures whose stories have been mythologized, is that it allows you to prove that they really did exist. Having an autograph from a Wyatt Earp or Calamity Jane is no less puzzling than having one of Cary Grant or Marilyn Monroe. All represent an effort to touch something tangible that belonged to an exceptional member of the human race, one who has achieved practical immortality.

Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc
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Joined: November 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm

July 5th, 2008, 8:18 pm #7

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Sorry, perhaps I should have added that I understand and appreciate the allure of a McMullin or a Charlie Faust. These men actually played a role in the history of the game, and that is the reason why they are remembered. Graham is only remembered and revered due to W.P. Kinsella needing a character with a great name to fit his storyline. It is the character that is loved, not the actual person. Ergo, I find it silly that people would shell out four figures to own something signed by a semi-fictitious individual. Just to show my hypocrisy, I'll happily buy any authentic Graham signatures at decent rates to add a few bits to my savings account!

***To add some backbone to my position, there was a WWII-era player named Lawrence "Crash" Davis, whose name was used for a fictional character in Bull Durham . Despite the cult status of the film, his autograph carries no premium.***
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Joined: November 18th, 2007, 4:30 pm

July 5th, 2008, 8:29 pm #8

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Adam,

I should add that I wholeheartedly agree with your eloquent comments, and hope that the above response clarifies my views.
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Joined: September 14th, 2001, 4:18 am

July 5th, 2008, 8:31 pm #9

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
I always find great interest in players who only appeared in one game in the majors,especially if it happened awhile ago. One of my favorite personal autographs I have is from a guy named Ty Pickup who died back in 1974. He played just one game for the Phillies in 1918 and had a 1.000 avg,1 hit in 1 AB. Gotta love the name and that batting average! Usually if you search hard enough you'll find a cool story behind why a guy played just one game,sometimes all you need to see is the stats and its obvious
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Joined: February 7th, 2004, 1:48 am

July 5th, 2008, 8:31 pm #10

I have been around this hobby for a long time and this was new to me, so I figured I would share with the collective. I have always liked the 1902-10 W601 Sporting Life Team Composites, as they are rare opportunities to see players of whom cards were never made.

I picked up the 1907 Scranton BBC W601 a few weeks ago and was thrilled to find a young man known to most of us through the epic baseball movie "Field of Dreams." The player was Archibald "Moonlight" Graham, who just as was said in the movie played in the majors but never had an official at bat. He would later quit professional baseball and become the town Doctor in a small Minnesota town for the rest of his life, earning the respect of nearly everyone who would come to know him.

I was unaware of any items that could even loosely be described as "baseball cards" or anything included in the ACC that included Graham up until now. He plyed for the Scranton Minors off-and-on from 1905-1908 (one of the nearly baseball card free eras) and was one of their usual outfielders.

Anyways, I thought there would be some interest among those in the hobby that really love the history of the game. Below are some pictures, there is some staining, but it isn't as bad as the large picture makes it seem(as can be seen in the close up photo).

I have not yet decided what I will do with the piece, but may just keep it.

-Rhett

Large photo of whole piece:


Close up of Archibald "Moonlight" Graham
Jodi, I understand where you are coming from BUT Graham is not a fictitious person. He was a major leaguer and later became a beloved person in his city of Chisholm, MN and was the town Doctor for nearly 60 years. While it was due to the Kinsella book and the later Costner film that brought him from obscurity to a nearly house-hold name, nonetheless he is now a well known part of baseball (and American) history. I see no difference between him and other "novelties" of the game like Faust. Faust merely had a strange life and suffered from mental/behavioral problems, as did Marty Bergen (a gruesome story there), but all these people are what help give the game of baseball some character (although I hope nothing like what Bergen did ever happens again, and wish it never had)
-Rhett
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