Anyone Heard of c1880 Old Pop Smith Tobacco Tin with Crossed Baseball Bats?

Anyone Heard of c1880 Old Pop Smith Tobacco Tin with Crossed Baseball Bats?

Joined: November 14th, 2007, 1:53 am

November 16th, 2007, 6:34 am #1

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Last edited by leonl on November 16th, 2007, 1:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 19th, 2007, 8:54 am

November 16th, 2007, 6:40 am #2

Carlton... What an amazing piece! I bet it was thrilling to see this one turn up. This would have to be the oldest sports-related tobacco tin that I am aware of.

Have you ever encountered another Baseball-themed Tin as old as this? Thanks for sharing!
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Joined: March 20th, 2006, 7:29 pm

November 16th, 2007, 6:44 am #3

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Pop Smith was the Yale mascot. As an Oxford man I wouldn't
give this tobacco the time of day.
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Joined: November 14th, 2007, 1:53 am

November 16th, 2007, 6:59 am #4

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Mark,
Thanks for the kind words! Good question if it's the oldest sports tobacco tin...might be come to think of it.

David,
Actually the Yale mascot was a bull dog named Handsome Dan, of which there is a tobacco tin...I have it but can't recall where it is...there have been a whole line of Handsome Dans over the years.

Well of course if you're an Oxford man you'd have no use for Old Pop Smith tobacco...you and Bill Clinton...you'd probably beat it with your cricket paddles....or bats or what ever they call um
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Joined: March 20th, 2006, 7:29 pm

November 16th, 2007, 7:06 am #5

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
I know of the bulldog. Not related to the MLB player, Pop Smith was the Yale super
fan in the 1800s. He was considered something a sports mascot as he an elderly man
who attended nearly every Yale sporting event.
Last edited by drc1 on November 16th, 2007, 7:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 14th, 2007, 1:53 am

November 16th, 2007, 7:11 am #6

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
David, You really knew who Old Pop Smith was?? It took me all kinds of research!!! How did you know? Are you from around New Haven? You the man! I lucked out and caught a quick reference to Pop Smith Little League in New Haven and followed it ! I tell you untill recently there wasn't reference to him on the web

Mark, Did you get my re-forwarded email yet?
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Joined: October 19th, 2007, 8:54 am

November 16th, 2007, 7:19 am #7

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Carlton...

Something must be wrong with Yahoo Mail, as it still hasn't come across. You can try my other (work) email... Msteinberg@kraft.com

They have been known to occasionally "block" emails of the personal, non-business variety, so hope it gets thru this time!
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Joined: November 14th, 2007, 1:53 am

November 16th, 2007, 7:24 am #8

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Mark,
OK, done!
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Joined: November 14th, 2007, 1:53 am

November 16th, 2007, 7:49 am #9

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Mark, I forgot to mention there is another cool c1880 sports tin, a multi sport tin called CHYP...It is a very undervalued tin in the Tins market...great graphics...lotta bang for the buck

you can see more shots of it it on my home page
http://www.sportsantiques.com/
click on the eBay Search link at right top, then scroll down...you'll see it.

Actually there is one being auctioned on eBay currently, by my friend Tom Cardiopoli, eBay handle "walnutts"...below the link to it:
http://cgi.ebay.com/1893-IVY-LEAGUE-C-H ... dZViewItem
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Joined: October 19th, 2007, 8:54 am

November 16th, 2007, 8:56 am #10

Has anyone here ever heard of a c1880 Old Pop Smith tobacco tin? Dimensions 4 1/2" wide x 3 3/8" deep x 1 3/4" tall


Below is part of the elaboration on this interesting tin I excerpted from my site

I first saw an Old Pop Smith tin about twenty years ago, pictured in a 1986 edition of a book titled: Tobacco Tins and Their Prices, by Al Bergevin. The crossed baseball bats and the bearded old timer sitting in the chair seemed to echo a civil war connection, but I've never learned that for sure. The flags with the "Y'" clearly imply Yale since the tobacco company M. Zunder & Sons was located in New Haven Connecticut. To the left and right of the word "mixture" are football goal posts, below it is a baseball. The bats have "squared barrel" ends (sawed of look), which date them to the 1880's.

For twenty years I kept an eye out, but never saw a single Old Pop Smith tin. I put it in my eBay permanent search to be notified if it ever surfaced. Very early A.M., the week of.......

You can read the whole story about this tin at my site http://www.sportsantiques.com . Just click the "See what's new" link at the top of my home page. Recently I located the history of it, of which I posted a copy of the original New York Times newspaper clipping from Nov. 10, 1890.

edited scan size
Wow... you aren't kidding, Carlton. That Tin is gorgeous, and appears to be way under-valued. This current one on Ebay is doing better than the one posted on your site. I cannot believe that piece could sell for under $100. Thanks for showing us this cool Tin!
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