use of timer

use of timer

Joined: August 4th, 2011, 7:15 pm

August 4th, 2011, 11:24 pm #1

i've been using a timer but i just noticed the manual says not to use a timer.

When I use a timer, i seem to be able to relax as I know that i won't meditate for too long or too short. But it is an abrupt ending when it goes off.

on the other hand, when I'm not using the timer I tend to feel a bit stressed and keep checking the time to be sure I haven't been meditating for too long.

Any suggestions?

thanks
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Joined: November 20th, 2005, 5:44 pm

August 4th, 2011, 11:47 pm #2

Paul,

My suggestion is not to use a timer. Let Nature take care of things, at least in one corner of your life.

As far as being stressed about time, the whole point of meditating is to release stress. So let it happen instead of trying to control it.

Our whole life in this suffering world is governed by rules and anxiety instead of freedom. Create a time, twice a day, where freedom reigns supreme. Dare to be different.

David Spector
Natural Stress Relief/USA
David Spector
Volunteer President,
Natural Stress Relief/USA
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Joined: October 1st, 2011, 9:33 pm

October 1st, 2011, 9:38 pm #3

You say "create a time where..."
To me that's what a timer does. It creates the time so that I don't have to worry about it. I can then free my mind. It's a tool that facilitates the process. Make sense?

I'm just a beginner, so...
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Joined: November 20th, 2005, 5:44 pm

October 2nd, 2011, 10:44 pm #4

i've been using a timer but i just noticed the manual says not to use a timer.

When I use a timer, i seem to be able to relax as I know that i won't meditate for too long or too short. But it is an abrupt ending when it goes off.

on the other hand, when I'm not using the timer I tend to feel a bit stressed and keep checking the time to be sure I haven't been meditating for too long.

Any suggestions?

thanks
davidprej,

I've written several postings here over the years concerning timers. If you've read them, then you have my recommendations.

Nothing about NSR is cast in cement. Guidelines are not rules or regulations that must be followed. The aim here is not to restrict freedom. The aim is to give useful, helpful advice.

Anyone who feels that a guideline is wrong for them is welcome to reject or not follow it. I do ask one thing in return, a small favor. I ask that you post your experiences here after a few weeks of not following the guideline. That way, we can all learn from your experience. A guideline can be overturned, adjusted, or confirmed. This will be helpful to future clients.

Thanks,

David Spector
Natural Stress Relief/USA
David Spector
Volunteer President,
Natural Stress Relief/USA
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Joined: February 19th, 2012, 10:31 am

February 19th, 2012, 10:39 am #5

i've been using a timer but i just noticed the manual says not to use a timer.

When I use a timer, i seem to be able to relax as I know that i won't meditate for too long or too short. But it is an abrupt ending when it goes off.

on the other hand, when I'm not using the timer I tend to feel a bit stressed and keep checking the time to be sure I haven't been meditating for too long.

Any suggestions?

thanks
Hi there,

I have the same problem. I can't seem to totally go with the flow if I don't have a timer. The fact of checking the clock while I'm meditating disturbs me and seems to draw mw out of my meditative state. The first time (I only just started two days ago, mind you) I did use a timer (my iPhone set to 15 min and the alarm is a very subtle harp sound that is barely audible...). Going through the manual, I then discovered that you're not supposed to use an alarm of any sort, so I didn't after that...
I think I will try with the timer again and see what happens.
I mean, the point is to do what works for you, right?

My first impression of NSR is one of relaxation and, for now, that's all I require... it is definitely doing me a lot of good even if I'm not yet transcending...
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Joined: November 20th, 2005, 5:44 pm

February 19th, 2012, 12:35 pm #6

i've been using a timer but i just noticed the manual says not to use a timer.

When I use a timer, i seem to be able to relax as I know that i won't meditate for too long or too short. But it is an abrupt ending when it goes off.

on the other hand, when I'm not using the timer I tend to feel a bit stressed and keep checking the time to be sure I haven't been meditating for too long.

Any suggestions?

thanks
ostndaise,

"...it is definitely doing me a lot of good even if I'm not yet transcending..."

Wait a minute! You are transcending. That's why it is refreshing you, giving you more energy and clarity with which to handle the challenges of life.

Did you think transcending had to be some flashy, woo-woo mystical experience? That's nonsense, and you won't find it in the NSR manual. As soon as you close your eyes, now that you've learned NSR, you automatically start transcending. That's what the mind wants to do. Then you pick up or remember the syllable, and you dive within even more. But then the deep rest of just those few seconds causes the nervous system to begin dissolving stress, which causes thoughts or other distractions.

All of these experiences that you are already having in each and every meditation session show that you are transcending. You are allowing your consciousness to expand and your body to release stress, efficiently, for the first time you your life. This is not just relaxation.

But, that having been said (and it is all true), your innocent and even skeptical attitude is the best one to have. Let this state of consciousness prove itself to you. And it will, with time.

Concerning the use of a timer, of course we need to keep an eye on the time. Otherwise, we might be tempted to meditate too long, which would trigger too much stress release, or we might accidentally meditate too short, which would not give us maximum results.

However, as I've written elsewhere on this Forum, a timer that makes a noise has drawbacks:

1. It does not respect or develop our inner awareness of when meditation is done.

2. If we are having a clear experience near the level of transcendence, it can shock the nervous system, creating a new stress when our aim is to eliminate all stresses.

But, that having been said, if you feel a strong desire to use an alarm, because of the freedom that seems to give, that is fine. This is only a guideline, which means that it doesn't have to be followed all the time, or slavishly.

Feel free to use an alarm. All I ask is that you keep us aware of your experiences in using it. Whether it works for you or you find a problem, either way, please post it here. Okay?

David Spector
Natural Stress Relief/USA
David Spector
Volunteer President,
Natural Stress Relief/USA
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Joined: February 1st, 2012, 6:13 pm

February 19th, 2012, 10:32 pm #7

I prefer using an alarm. I find I enjoy the freedom of not having to watch a clock for 15 minutes twice a day. The volume level of the alarm is key in providing a comfortable experience. Having an alarm that that leaves me feeling as if I have been hit by a school bus isn't exactly the way to finish a meditation. A very soft volume level, just enough to get me to notice that time is up, has provided a positive experience for me.
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Joined: November 20th, 2005, 5:44 pm

February 19th, 2012, 11:51 pm #8

i've been using a timer but i just noticed the manual says not to use a timer.

When I use a timer, i seem to be able to relax as I know that i won't meditate for too long or too short. But it is an abrupt ending when it goes off.

on the other hand, when I'm not using the timer I tend to feel a bit stressed and keep checking the time to be sure I haven't been meditating for too long.

Any suggestions?

thanks
Jon,

Thank you for generously sharing your experience. I hope others who have used alarms will be encouraged to share their experiences, too. If we have enough responses, maybe we can find enough evidence to modify the guideline.

How long have you been timing your meditation using an alarm?

David Spector
Natural Stress Relief/USA
David Spector
Volunteer President,
Natural Stress Relief/USA
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Joined: February 1st, 2012, 6:13 pm

February 20th, 2012, 6:36 am #9

Hi David,

I have been using an alarm or meditation timer for at least one year. It allows me a way to maintain a consistent daily meditation practice without fear of rushing to stay on schedule because I went overtime on my meditation (this is easy for me to do). In practice, I have become habituated to the sound. It has become just another part of my routine: a car goes by, a dove is cooing, someone closes a door, my timer goes off. Nothing special.
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Joined: December 29th, 2011, 8:08 pm

February 23rd, 2012, 8:51 pm #10

As a long time practitioner of mindfulness meditation, I have tons of experience using meditation timers. Timers, chimes, bells, etc. are part and parcel of mindfulness meditation.

I have found NSR meditation liberating in this sense: no worries about time! As David says, just let Nature takes it course and that's what I've been doing.

So what if I don't meditate for precisely 15 minutes? Take today for example, for my afternoon session I meditated for over 18 minutes. It felt like I meditated for only ......well, I don't know what it felt like to be honest with you.....time itself I guess was transcended in a sense.

Anyway, my point is that perhaps my body/mind/spirit needed the extra time in transcendence. I came out of meditation refreshed, relaxed, happy, even joyful. It was wonderful.

So, here's what I do: I use a simple kitchen timer I bought at Walmart and just press the Start button. It goes 00:00...00:01...00:02...00:03...00:04, etc. And I forget about it. It really is liberating.

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