There's one in every crowd...

There's one in every crowd...

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

August 13th, 2011, 3:54 am #1

LoL

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Asmara
Asmara

August 13th, 2011, 5:30 am #2




for vine ripened !!!



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Dennis
Dennis

August 13th, 2011, 10:25 am #3

Fresh picked tomatoes! Nothing better!

What are the prognostications on the quantity and quality of the crop from the collective this year!?
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John
John

August 13th, 2011, 2:00 pm #4

We've been eating them on a daily basis for the past few days. Nothing I like better than sliced, fresh tomatoes with a sprinkle of black pepper on two slices of whole wheat toast smeared with low fat miracle whip. The simple pleasures are the best!.
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mooster
mooster

August 13th, 2011, 9:04 pm #5

John, I thought you lived in a Hellmann's Zone?

Do you ever make your own Mayo? I love it when I feel like doing it. Can't be beat. But when I'm not whipping my own miracle (no dirty minds) I prefer the Miracle Whip too. To my tasting, Helmann's (Best Foods Mayo in Celt's neck o' the woods) taste Hellishly like good mayonnaise gone bad. Not rotten, but worth throwing out and starting over.

Miracle Whip has the zing! and possesses awesomeness all its own, but doesn't taste like real mayo. At least not the way I make it and I learned from Julia Child. Well, I learned from her book.

Julia, you magnificent bastard.......



Peace,
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Dennis
Dennis

August 13th, 2011, 10:47 pm #6

But I like my tomatoes plucked washed and eaten with a little salt.........sometimes I even take the time to slice 'em before chomping!
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John
John

August 13th, 2011, 11:59 pm #7

The tomatoes from our garden this year are almost sugar sweet and damn tasty. RE: Miracle Whip. I was born and raised on the stuff. The "Lite Variety" tastes so much like the original, I've started buying it all the time, except when I make potato salad.
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Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

August 14th, 2011, 5:12 am #8

Fresh picked tomatoes! Nothing better!

What are the prognostications on the quantity and quality of the crop from the collective this year!?
`
People's Collective Farm Number Zero may be officially out of the tomato growing business after this season for a period of 3 years, in order to break all known disease cycles. Some manner of ailment has affected 8 of 14 plants grown this year - same one which killed 2 plants last year, and which can apparently survive over the Winter season. I've already been eating this year's crop, and will undoubtedly get more from the looks of things, but the combination of this plant disease and a growing season reduced by inclement weather will result in less than hoped for results.
My alternate plan for next year is all tomatoes grown in pots filled with "store-bought" soil, since the ones I'm growing that way now have not been affected by whatever is killing the others.
On the upside, any non-ripe specimins I must pick as the plants die mean that many more for green tomato soup.

Other items "on the menu" thusfar which have come from PCF#0 include green beans, radishes (mostly the greens, though I did pull out a couple actual radishes), a variety of lettuces, and cucumbers.
I've also got 2 varieties of spuds growing which I have yet to dig up, and spaghetti squash I planted late - on a whim, mostly, as the seeds were on sale, and a friend of mine gave me these 3 circular stone "wheels" he claimed had once been part of a blade sharpening device which I used as planters - that are maturing nicely. Plus a couple or 4 more vines that I transplanted to another spot because I jammed the whole bag of seeds into these stone rings, and all of them germinated and grew, and were sucking up more water than I could pump into 'em even watering twice a day.

The broccoli I planted seems to have been a waste of time. I think it was too hot again this year. I'm through with trying to grow this as well, since it's the 2nd year without satisfactory results.

Some animal apparently consumed the young sprouts of all the Swiss chard I planted, as all of a sudden within a matter of days, there were nothing but stubs where the plants had been. Half an old brick I picked up at the site of a demolished building some time back was thrown at a rabbit seen in the vicinity of the farm a couple of weeks later just out of spite, but the loss of the chard meant I used that space to plant the radishes, and I've thoroughly enjoyed the greens (Thanks YouTube "gutter gardening" guy whose video I saw that gave me the idea to plant radishes - tho' I didn't do so in a length of gutter attached to the side of a stoackade fence like you did...).

I have some green pepper plants which seem mature enough to be producing peppers, but there are only wee weensy ones visible thus far - and I mean really weensy. I suppose there is enough time left in the growing season for a crop to mature. We shall see.

The Brussels sprouts I planted also seem to be a "sorta kinda maybe" item at this point. I think I didn't thin out the plants enough for them to grow "properly". They seem healthy, but I dunno if there will be enough time for them to produce anything before the growing season is over, since they don't yet look anything like the mature specimins of the plants I saw last year. Again, we'll see.
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Dennis
Dennis

August 14th, 2011, 11:08 am #9

Anything that lives through your winters should be bottled and sold to the gumbimnt for the next generation of biological warfare weapons!

Best of luck on the rest! Seems you've got quite a variety too. How many acres did you plant!?
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Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

August 14th, 2011, 3:07 pm #10

`
Although whatever this is is definitely not the same "Late Blight" which struck a couple or 3 years back, my research into that garnered the info that fungi can produce what was termed "hardened" spores capable of surviving the Winter freeze. Can't recall the exact terminology, but I think this results from the "fungoid' equivalent of being polinated or fertilized, as opposed to those which are not. It's not that surprising - even if it IS that irritating. Plant bulbs survive over Winter, after all. Even the chives I have in pots grow back every year. (forgot to mention those !)

Below are a couple of pics of this year's operation - most of it, anyway. I also used 6 pots the size of a small bucket for the broccooli, and 10 6-inch x 2-foot "window box" style planters for the peppers - and spinach, which I also forgot to mention, and have already consumed the entire crop which grew before the plants "bolted" due to the heat.

From fore to background are green beans, radishes(almost too short to see), lettuce mix, brussels sprouts, then from left to right squash, one type of spuds, and cucumbers - the latter also run along the right edge to the back of the shot (except for some more squash, the vines of which look quite like the cukes, even including these weird little tendrils which keep trying to wrap around every other plant they encounter as the vines grow. might have to invest in or make some sort of trellises if I grow cukes next year). Tomatoes at the back of this shot - 9 plants in the ground, and 5 potted because I ran out of room - yet again, I might add.
LoL


Here's the same setup from the opposite side. (Gotta luv that dead brown lawn !)
On the right in the foreground is the other type of spuds in a planter I made from stacked rings of landcape edging, and you can see 3 of the 4 big pots with tomatoes in 'em. Barely visible at left is a small red pot with a tomato called a "Tiny Tim" in it, which somebody gave me as a wee sprig that I didn't think would survive. a pic of it is below.


Tiny Tim tomato. It's about 10 inches or a foot high, and the tomatoes are about the size of a small grape or less.



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