Semi-auto versus bolt/lever action...

Semi-auto versus bolt/lever action...

Joined: October 30th, 2005, 12:58 pm

August 14th, 2012, 1:01 pm #1

What really is the difference in accuracy between the semi and manually operated actions for the average shooter/hunter?

I would argue either none whatsoever or not enough to make a difference. Last survey I saw indicated that the vast majority of deer killed in my region were shot at a maximum range of about 60 yards. Not enough distance to affect shot placement except for misses caused by operator error.

Looks more like an attempt by manufacturers to squeeze a few more bucks out of the average nimrod than anything else to me.

I suppose it could be an issue for those who enjoy blazing at varmints at a few hundred yards, but other than that?! Perhaps even then with a correctly sighted scope the difference would be marginal. And the 50 cal. sniper rifles are semi-auto are they not?

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mooster
mooster

August 14th, 2012, 3:02 pm #2

Go with the model weapon featured on the front page of the LZ below the title. Use the grenade launcher - against rabbits & squirrels.

Deer hunting is one shot-one kill. If you don't have the shot you don't take it. I go bow hunting and I have to get within 30-35 yards. Do I wish I had an automatic arrow flinger? Yes, but that's beside the point. When I do gun hunt, I use an M1 Garand, iron sights, no scope. It's a semi of course, but I'm only going to fire once.

Why? Is there a debate going on between you and a hunting buddy? You get my vote as being right, Dennis. In the end, it's what's in your freezer that counts not what's in your gun locker.

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Joined: October 30th, 2005, 12:58 pm

August 14th, 2012, 5:24 pm #3

Just the old tale of bolt being more accurate. Might matter punching paper, but not for 90+% of shots in the woods for 90+% of the average hunters.

I'm down with you on the one shot thing. I'd rather load it in the Ram and head for camp, heat and hot running water than warm myself by tracking and dragging for a few hours.

I admire bow hunters. I don't shoot badly with one, but know myself too well to use one. Practice shooting with the bow would not be a strength. There is no need to be out with one just to earn the nickname "Great Wounder!"
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mooster
mooster

August 14th, 2012, 6:34 pm #4

In target practice I'm deadly out past 50 yards. I read that the English longbowmen were expected to consistently hit a one foot by one foot target at 100 yards. Wow. That's my goal but I'm not there even after several years of archery.

Hunting is a completely different thing though. I won't take a shot unless I'm absolutely positively certain that it's a kill. That not only involves being in under 35 yards, but a good broadside or quartering away profile is a must. I'll hold the shot and come back empty handed before I take a shot I'm not certain of. There's definitly a morality issue there, but the main reason is like you said, I'm not following a blood trail for hours and then dragging all night through hellish terrain (for non hunters, wounded deer will try to go home and they bed down in dense thickets). And fark that.

Peace,

PS: Bowfishing doesn't count. Take the shot. It's always a best guestimate if you've judged the size and depth properly and a wounded fish is on the line regardless. Plus, ta hell with 'em. They're fish.
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Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

August 15th, 2012, 3:57 am #5

What really is the difference in accuracy between the semi and manually operated actions for the average shooter/hunter?

I would argue either none whatsoever or not enough to make a difference. Last survey I saw indicated that the vast majority of deer killed in my region were shot at a maximum range of about 60 yards. Not enough distance to affect shot placement except for misses caused by operator error.

Looks more like an attempt by manufacturers to squeeze a few more bucks out of the average nimrod than anything else to me.

I suppose it could be an issue for those who enjoy blazing at varmints at a few hundred yards, but other than that?! Perhaps even then with a correctly sighted scope the difference would be marginal. And the 50 cal. sniper rifles are semi-auto are they not?
`
At least in the county I live in. I think farther away from semi-sorta-kinda population centers hunting with rifles is allowed by SSRNY law. Hunters here seem to get along fine with shotguns, though. There's a bow season as well, of course, but unfortunately crossbows are not permitted - hence my idea of using a Medieval siege crossbow is right out.
As to shotguns... ...if I were inclined to such an undertaking, I should like to utilize the impressive looking AA-12 model.

Though I suspect the 32 round drum capacity violates another law regarding magazine capacity.

Plus, I fear I would be as likely to attempt to empty the entire drum into some poor, dumb hooved thing as to fire one round, just to see how many I could hit it with before it fell down.

hee hee hee hee hee hee hee hee hee !!!!!
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Joined: October 30th, 2005, 12:58 pm

August 15th, 2012, 12:25 pm #6

Buckshot or slug (aka Punkin' Ball), or both?
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Joined: October 30th, 2005, 12:58 pm

August 15th, 2012, 2:19 pm #7

In target practice I'm deadly out past 50 yards. I read that the English longbowmen were expected to consistently hit a one foot by one foot target at 100 yards. Wow. That's my goal but I'm not there even after several years of archery.

Hunting is a completely different thing though. I won't take a shot unless I'm absolutely positively certain that it's a kill. That not only involves being in under 35 yards, but a good broadside or quartering away profile is a must. I'll hold the shot and come back empty handed before I take a shot I'm not certain of. There's definitly a morality issue there, but the main reason is like you said, I'm not following a blood trail for hours and then dragging all night through hellish terrain (for non hunters, wounded deer will try to go home and they bed down in dense thickets). And fark that.

Peace,

PS: Bowfishing doesn't count. Take the shot. It's always a best guestimate if you've judged the size and depth properly and a wounded fish is on the line regardless. Plus, ta hell with 'em. They're fish.
The old man's luck has been running better lately! Last week I landed a largmouth that ran just about 2 feet and probalby weighed in the 5 1/2 to 7 pound range. I can't be more accurate than that because I couldn't hold him.

He started flopping with the lure still in when I went to grab his lip and seeing those treble hooks coming close to my flesh was enough to make me let go. And yes JB, I would have kept that one!

Monday I got an 18 inch 4 3/4 pound smallmouth at another buddies pond. That one is catch and release only.
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Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

August 16th, 2012, 4:51 am #8

Buckshot or slug (aka Punkin' Ball), or both?
`
The guys I know who hunt all claim to use use slug rounds - except the bow guy who used to work at the paper warehouse, of course.
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Joined: October 30th, 2005, 12:58 pm

August 16th, 2012, 5:37 pm #9

I've never hunted deer with the scatter gun, but feel confident I could handle bagging one that way. I started with my dad's old Winchester Model 94 and moved up to the '06 autoloader. I won't be buying anything else, but I am considering breaking the muzzle loader back out. I did enjoy hunting with it but quit when I dropped out one camp to which I belonged.
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celtredleg
celtredleg

August 19th, 2012, 10:28 am #10

What really is the difference in accuracy between the semi and manually operated actions for the average shooter/hunter?

I would argue either none whatsoever or not enough to make a difference. Last survey I saw indicated that the vast majority of deer killed in my region were shot at a maximum range of about 60 yards. Not enough distance to affect shot placement except for misses caused by operator error.

Looks more like an attempt by manufacturers to squeeze a few more bucks out of the average nimrod than anything else to me.

I suppose it could be an issue for those who enjoy blazing at varmints at a few hundred yards, but other than that?! Perhaps even then with a correctly sighted scope the difference would be marginal. And the 50 cal. sniper rifles are semi-auto are they not?
cant come close to the ability of the weapon, no matter what the action looks like. However, there is plenty of evidence to support the idea that a lot of semi-auto shooters go frp the spray and pray approach. So with a bolt, you are required to go slow and make it count.

I can and have hit running rabbits from the back of a moving Ford Bronco with my gerand. Wound one? no stress, they are just long eared rats. Most ranchers I know are peretty much anti-rabbit as well.

Deer are indeed different. But I hunt them, or did when i stiill got out and hunted with my model 70 in .300 winchester. Why? because I can shoot better with it. And since I got bifocals (hey arent those for old guys?) I have found I cant shoot iron sites very well, cant see the damn things and the target. But a scope works just fine. As for that .300, well I would rather break one more than needed than not enough. If I have a bad day and am off by a little, that .300 creates enough internal havoc to forgive minort sins.

Not finding a wounded animal (rabbits are vermin and so dont count) is not an option in my family. So if you shoot it you are bringing it bsack. I have no fun dragging things over hill and dale, so would rather not shoot than Spend the rest of the day and half the night trying to find it and get it back.

owen
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