I feel for these guys... ...I really do...

I feel for these guys... ...I really do...

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

October 12th, 2009, 3:59 am #1

Saudis want aid if world cuts oil dependence http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33225373/ns ... vironment/

BANGKOK - There are plenty of needy countries at the U.N. climate talks in Bangkok that make the case they need financial assistance to adapt to the impacts of global warming. Then there are the Saudis.

Saudi Arabia has led a quiet campaign during these and other negotiations demanding behind closed doors that oil-producing nations get special financial assistance if a new climate pact calls for substantial reductions in the use of fossil fuels.

That campaign comes despite an International Energy Agency report released this week showing that OPEC revenues would still increase $23 trillion between 2008 and 2030 a fourfold increase compared to the period from 1985 to 2007 if countries agree to significantly slash emissions and thereby cut their use of oil. That is the limit most countries agree is needed to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

The head of the Saudi delegation Mohammad S. Al Sabban dismissed the IEA figures as "biased" and said OPEC's own calculations showed that Saudi Arabia would lose $19 billion a year starting in 2012 under a new climate pact. The region would lose much more, he said.

The head of the Saudi delegation Mohammad S. Al Sabban dismissed the IEA figures as "biased" and said OPEC's own calculations showed that Saudi Arabia would lose $19 billion a year starting in 2012 under a new climate pact. The region would lose much more, he said.

'Very serious'
"We are among the economically vulnerable countries," Al Sabban told The Associated Press on the sidelines of the talks ahead of negotiations in Copenhagen in December for a treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012.

"This is very serious for us," he continued. "We are in the process of diversifying our economy but this will take a long time. We don't have too many resources."

Saudi Arabia, which sits atop the world's largest proven oil reserves, is seeing economic growth slide because of fallout from the global meltdown, but experts still expect the country, flush with cash from oil's earlier price spike last year, to be better able than other nations to cope with the current crisis.

Al Sabban accused Western nations of pursuing an agenda against oil producers, under the guise of protecting the planet.

"Many politicians in the Western world think these climate change negotiations and the new agreement will provide them with a golden opportunity to reduce their dependence on imported oil," Al Sabban said. "That means you will transfer the burden to developing countries, especially to those highly dependent on the exploitation of oil."

Al Sabban said his country wanted a new deal and was not impeding progress in talks as some activists have claimed.
Quote
Share

John
John

October 12th, 2009, 4:27 am #2

that as far as we're concerned, they can eat their sand and drink their oil.
Quote
Share

Dennis
Dennis

October 15th, 2009, 9:00 am #3

Funny, very funny! Like John said, they have plenty of fixin's for the ultimate SANDwich. We are however not ready to cut the cord their oil provides us.
Quote
Share

Freya123
Freya123

October 18th, 2009, 1:45 pm #4

Saudis want aid if world cuts oil dependence http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33225373/ns ... vironment/

BANGKOK - There are plenty of needy countries at the U.N. climate talks in Bangkok that make the case they need financial assistance to adapt to the impacts of global warming. Then there are the Saudis.

Saudi Arabia has led a quiet campaign during these and other negotiations demanding behind closed doors that oil-producing nations get special financial assistance if a new climate pact calls for substantial reductions in the use of fossil fuels.

That campaign comes despite an International Energy Agency report released this week showing that OPEC revenues would still increase $23 trillion between 2008 and 2030 a fourfold increase compared to the period from 1985 to 2007 if countries agree to significantly slash emissions and thereby cut their use of oil. That is the limit most countries agree is needed to avoid the worst impacts of climate change.

The head of the Saudi delegation Mohammad S. Al Sabban dismissed the IEA figures as "biased" and said OPEC's own calculations showed that Saudi Arabia would lose $19 billion a year starting in 2012 under a new climate pact. The region would lose much more, he said.

The head of the Saudi delegation Mohammad S. Al Sabban dismissed the IEA figures as "biased" and said OPEC's own calculations showed that Saudi Arabia would lose $19 billion a year starting in 2012 under a new climate pact. The region would lose much more, he said.

'Very serious'
"We are among the economically vulnerable countries," Al Sabban told The Associated Press on the sidelines of the talks ahead of negotiations in Copenhagen in December for a treaty to replace the Kyoto Protocol, which expires in 2012.

"This is very serious for us," he continued. "We are in the process of diversifying our economy but this will take a long time. We don't have too many resources."

Saudi Arabia, which sits atop the world's largest proven oil reserves, is seeing economic growth slide because of fallout from the global meltdown, but experts still expect the country, flush with cash from oil's earlier price spike last year, to be better able than other nations to cope with the current crisis.

Al Sabban accused Western nations of pursuing an agenda against oil producers, under the guise of protecting the planet.

"Many politicians in the Western world think these climate change negotiations and the new agreement will provide them with a golden opportunity to reduce their dependence on imported oil," Al Sabban said. "That means you will transfer the burden to developing countries, especially to those highly dependent on the exploitation of oil."

Al Sabban said his country wanted a new deal and was not impeding progress in talks as some activists have claimed.
the nerve of those people. Down here in oil country, we call it Oil Welfare!
Quote
Share

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

October 18th, 2009, 2:45 pm #5

`
I gotta laugh when they call themselves a land of 'rugged individualists'... ...I mean, the place is a Socialist Republic of grotesque proportions. The federal gov't owns almost 3/4 of the land, they get 2 bucks back for every one they pay in taxes, and every citizen gets an annual gov't provided stipend which is the result of a special tax levied on the biggest industry in the state !

Quote
Share

Dennis
Dennis

October 21st, 2009, 9:34 am #6

Yep, TOT my dear Loki. Rugged individualists indeed. Why the ex-governor "tits" said so didn't she?

And we all belive her, don't we? After all, she even kind of could guess where Russia was! Which of course made her competent enough to be a heart beat away from the Presidency.........
Last edited by D1J1 on October 21st, 2009, 10:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share