How the devil does something like this happen ?

How the devil does something like this happen ?

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

July 6th, 2010, 5:07 am #1

`
I have a small tomato plant in a pot - a "late arrival" from among some generously donated to me by way of replacements for the ones which fared poorly enough during the "Spring deluge" of rain to croak on me.

All of a sudden these other things sprouted up out of the dirt in the pot for no readily apparent reason -

I've since identified them tentatively as sunflowers.

Thing is, I never planted them, and have no idea how the seeds got in there.

I thought they might have been squash at first, as I did try to start some sqash in small containers & tossed the dirt from 'em into a bigger tub to use for whatever when they didn't do well enough & I decided to just plant more right in the ground.

I guess unless some meandering squirrel stashed 'em in the pot, they must have been in a bag of dirt I bought or some damn thing.

The bonus is that I found out that sunflower sprouts are edible, so even though I think I'm going to try growing the ones in the pot to full size, I have another item to attempt to grow enough of to add to me old salad bowl !

Quote
Share

Dennis
Dennis

July 6th, 2010, 9:16 am #2

Was there a whole batch of unshelled seeds in a clump? They would be the culprits then. If not, I'd put my money on our little feathered friends.

Squirrels is among our stooopidest peoples though. The silly things bust their humps securing food for the winter, then forget where they put it much of the time. It is funny to watch their antics when two or more belive the same stash is their's alone.

I'm certain if you got the ID of sunflowers from the seeds, but the tiny ones do look exactly like some kind of nusiance thing that regularly falls victim to roundup here at the fiefdom.
Quote
Share

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

July 6th, 2010, 3:16 pm #3

`
I had no idea anything was alive in the pot but the tomato - except for those wee things you mentioned. No idea what they are, but they do seem to appear "out of nowhere" in an equally "miraculous" manner. I just pick 'em out of pots or the ground whenever they get big enough to uproot and await the next batch.

I only found that the larger ones might be sunflowers by "Googling" aorund for photos of plant sprouts until I found shots of something which resembled them.
Quote
Share

mooster
mooster

July 6th, 2010, 4:59 pm #4

Did you use your own dirt or commercial potting soil? Either way (and most likely with the store-bought stuff) if the dirt isn't "sterilized" then all kinds of things can come growing up out of it. Depends upon what was in the soil before. In your case it was apparently sunflowers.

I didn't know the shoots were edible. In Kansas there are sunflowers everywhere as you can imagine. These idiots made it their state symbol. I think it should be chewing tobacco but I don't get a vote.

Loke, since you've obviously looked into it already, how is the nutrtional value of sunflower greens as opposed to spinach? I always make spinach salads because lettuce is worthless. But if sunflower is just as good (and quite a bit more costless) I might start doing my salads that way.
Quote
Share

Loki Luv, MD°
Loki Luv, MD°

July 6th, 2010, 5:30 pm #5

`
Some dirt from the plot I cleared of grass for the garden, some compost mix a firend of mine made, some "store bought" topsoil, some potting soil, some hummus mix froma bag of that I bought... ...probably some powdered dried leaves from a tree in my yard. Maybe I dug up a squirrel stash, put it in the pot, and didn't even know it.
LoL

I know what you mean about all manner of stuff popping up from bagged topsoil. One "bargain" bag I used is a likely suspect in a mini-plague of some sort of wee weeds that grew in among the turnips I planted... ...weird.

Concerning sunflower nutrition - one site I found declares them to be "The Super Food"

An interesting note is the apparent protien content, among other things, of course.

Considering that sunflower seeds are almost 25% protein, it is no wonder that sunflower sprouts and greens, grown from these seeds, are nutritional super foods with few rivals. A mere 3.5 ounces of sprouted seeds contains a whopping 22.78 grams of protein! The same amount of chicken breast meat contains just slightly more protein at 26.25 grams. Sunflower sprouts and greens are a rich source of vitamins A, B complex, D, and E and minerals including calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and zinc.

In addition to these vitamins and minerals, sunflower sprouts and greens are a rich source of lecithin which helps break down fatty acids into an easily digestible water soluble form, and chlorophyll which benefits many functions within the body, including building blood supply, revitalizing tissue, calming inflammation, activating enzymes, and deodorizing the body. But if they are this good for you, they must taste bad? Wrong! Sunflower greens are considered a delicacy among gourmets and are known for a crisp nutty flavor.



Read more at Suite101: Sunflower Greens, the Super Food!: Growing this Nutritional Powerhouse is Easier than Many People Thinkhttp://kitchen-gardens.suite101.com/art ... z0svM2c3ZV
Quote
Share