Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

June 19th, 2018, 12:08 am #21

As I recall, the Hopkins was the one which was virtually a remake of the Laughton as opposed to another version of the novel.

I've seen at least 8 film or TV versions of HUNCHBACK and ya know what? Not one of 'em was a horror film, that's what.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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countplastica
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Joined: April 13th, 2008, 11:05 pm

June 19th, 2018, 12:10 am #22

It has some horrible events but it's not a horror story. It is one of the only books I read as a teen that brought me to tears at the end. Now that I think of it, I can't recall the others, though I know there were some.
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will
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Joined: November 17th, 2009, 2:23 am

June 19th, 2018, 12:27 am #23

The Laughton one comes pretty darn close to a horror movie. That ending, " Why couldn't I be made of stone like you?" as Quasimodo practically turns into a gargoyle, has a definite horror vibe.
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

June 19th, 2018, 12:28 am #24

I don't feel horror in that conclusion at all. It's incredibly human and almost unbearably sad, not horrifying.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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will
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Joined: November 17th, 2009, 2:23 am

June 19th, 2018, 12:32 am #25

Neither is much of Bride of Frankenstein horrifying. The ending is sad for the Monster. The Bride doesn't try to kill him. She just rejects him.
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

June 19th, 2018, 12:38 am #26

But the Monster is made of dead men, the Bride is made from God-knows-what, murders and grave robbing and skeletons oh my.

Quasimodo is a guy suffering from severe birth defects who has fallen in with bad, but not supernatural, company.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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blufeld
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Joined: March 21st, 2017, 4:34 pm

June 19th, 2018, 2:00 pm #27

Rick-or Wich2, if you read this-have you ever involved, or acted in, a version of THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME?  Or does it not play well on the stage?
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

June 20th, 2018, 2:16 am #28

Blu, I've never acted in, nor seen, a stage HUNCHBACK. I did work with a couple of guys who had performed in a musical version of the show (before Disney's musicalization) in Las Vegas. I gather it was pretty successful there. But then again...it was Las Vegas.

I know a stage adaptation of the Disney movie has been done in many places (but not Broadway). I gather it's not likely to make it to the Great White Way anytime soon.

Not long ago I read of yet another production of a musical HUNCHBACK somewhere. Not sure if it was the Disney or the one from Vegas or something else altogether.  There certainly could be multiple versions. I know there are at least 5 musical versions of PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, probably more.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Robolly
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Robolly
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Joined: March 13th, 2018, 9:19 am

June 20th, 2018, 9:35 am #29

I've seen the Chaney version (I've got that on Laser Disc!), Laughton's and the one starring Anthony Quinn (I get the impression that the Aurora model with more based on the Quinn version than Chaney's).  I found all three good, with Laughton's being the best.  As for silent films that may be "watchable" for people who aren't into silents,  I think THE MAN WHO LAUGHS may work for them.
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

June 20th, 2018, 3:10 pm #30

blufeld wrote: Rick-or Wich2, if you read this-have you ever involved, or acted in, a version of THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME?  Or does it not play well on the stage?
Nope, never did, blu.

Some horror-ish things I have done include HOUSE OF USHER, DRAC and FRANK (to be revived this October) as audio dramas, and the gory, avenging Elizabethan ghost in the Indie film THE CHANGELING.

Could HUNCH work on stage? Well, as usual that depends on three things: script, script and script. There are certainly enough meaty scenes to be adapted, among interesting characters.
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marbpl2
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Joined: May 8th, 2008, 5:52 pm

June 20th, 2018, 3:43 pm #31

DonM435 wrote:
blufeld wrote: How many movies has Disney "ruined" by remaking them as cartoons?  "Ruined" is a harsh word, but I'm using it as a generic term, not a damning one, because this movies were probably great to the would-be audience of children (and entertaining to the grown ups).  My point is remaking them, when a superior movie is already out there for Monster Kids.  I can think of three without even trying:
THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
HERCULES
TARZAN 
Any more?
There was a 'toon remake of THE KING AND I with a new, happy ending, but I don't think it was Disney. Same idea, though.
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countplastica
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Joined: April 13th, 2008, 11:05 pm

June 21st, 2018, 12:02 am #32

Wich2 wrote:
blufeld wrote: Rick-or Wich2, if you read this-have you ever involved, or acted in, a version of THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME?  Or does it not play well on the stage?
Nope, never did, blu.

Some horror-ish things I have done include HOUSE OF USHER, DRAC and FRANK (to be revived this October) as audio dramas, and the gory, avenging Elizabethan ghost in the Indie film THE CHANGELING.

Could HUNCH work on stage? Well, as usual that depends on three things: script, script and script. There are certainly enough meaty scenes to be adapted, among interesting characters.
Lovely Esmerelda hanged as brutally as in the book would be an utter shock for any audience. The "dust to dust" epilogue would be a great closer, too. Kind of a reverse nod to the opening of Webber's PHANTOM.
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marbpl2
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June 21st, 2018, 1:12 pm #33

countplastica wrote:
Wich2 wrote:
blufeld wrote: Rick-or Wich2, if you read this-have you ever involved, or acted in, a version of THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME?  Or does it not play well on the stage?
Nope, never did, blu.

Some horror-ish things I have done include HOUSE OF USHER, DRAC and FRANK (to be revived this October) as audio dramas, and the gory, avenging Elizabethan ghost in the Indie film THE CHANGELING.

Could HUNCH work on stage? Well, as usual that depends on three things: script, script and script. There are certainly enough meaty scenes to be adapted, among interesting characters.
Lovely Esmerelda hanged as brutally as in the book would be an utter shock for any audience. The "dust to dust" epilogue would be a great closer, too. Kind of a reverse nod to the opening of Webber's PHANTOM.
She actually does die in the 1956 Anthony Quinn and 1977 Warren Clarke versions.
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Joined: August 10th, 2015, 9:50 pm

July 10th, 2018, 10:32 pm #34

Wich2 wrote:
BaronessMeinster wrote: I can´t stand modern films and TV. I have tried, really tried, but visually or otherwise... I just see horrid bore or worse.   I don´t know what gives.  
Baroness, they were ALL "modern," once! Good is Good.
There is old Finnish saying Hyvää päivää, kirvesvartta.  Good day! Ax handle.  

Wiki: Expression means that two people are not at the same wavelength, meaning they do not understand what the other means, even though they speak with seemingly the same terms. A similar expression is the one speaking about the fence and another about the picket of the fence.

Let me rephrase  I have genuinely tried.  I´m not saying the whole world is wrong, and I´m right!  Obviously that´s not the case. On the contrary:  I just don´t understand art of cinema.  I´m not boasting, I´m lamenting. 
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Robert Troch
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Joined: October 8th, 2007, 4:20 pm

July 12th, 2018, 1:18 pm #35

Rick wrote: But the Monster is made of dead men, the Bride is made from God-knows-what, murders and grave robbing and skeletons oh my.

Quasimodo is a guy suffering from severe birth defects who has fallen in with bad, but not supernatural, company.
Very true. Like i always say...context. context, context.

And by the way Cabinet of dr. Caligari, City Lights, and Haxan are also worth a watch. All excellent silents.

Robert T.
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

July 12th, 2018, 2:25 pm #36

Robert Troch wrote:

 And by the way Cabinet of dr. Caligari, City Lights, and Haxan are also worth a watch. All excellent silents.

And SUNRISE, THE GENERAL, THE BELOVED ROGUE, DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE, THE THIEF OF BAGDAD, THE WIND and...
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