Joined: April 22nd, 2007, 10:37 pm

February 8th, 2017, 10:41 pm #441

I like it, It didn't get a lot of play [if any] on UK TV and the friends I've shown it to liked it too. It has a reputation and lived up to it, not just because of the cast.
The scene with Sally Yarnell in the dungeons is a jumper and certainly would have been the talk of the playground when we were kids [if we could have seen it]

Russ
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Burt Wilson
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February 23rd, 2017, 4:17 am #442

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Burt Wilson
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February 23rd, 2017, 4:33 am #443

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Burt Wilson
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February 23rd, 2017, 6:35 pm #444

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Paul Haight
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May 26th, 2018, 4:53 pm #445

560807-sheep.jpg

BLACK SHEEP is definitely my favorite Borlis Karloff movie ever.
It'll be dawn soon. Get rid of that eye!
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PJAceto
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May 26th, 2018, 5:10 pm #446

Ya know, sometimes CometTV lists it by this name.
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CucamongaDan
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Joined: October 25th, 2006, 1:24 pm

May 26th, 2018, 8:09 pm #447

Don't forget Cornell Wilde when you're listing the best extra-l actors.
Come one, come all, come check out the New Blind Hermit's Hut and Lounge . (The password is cucacuca3 ).    The new home for CHFB movie chats! Open 24/7  for CHFB members' conversations and random comment leaving.
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Monsterpal
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May 27th, 2018, 7:07 pm #448

They named a university after him.
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kcor
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kcor
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May 27th, 2018, 7:26 pm #449

University Girls Go Wilde!
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Joined: November 25th, 2017, 8:55 am

May 30th, 2018, 1:44 am #450



"Bela, we present you with this commemorative award for....well, for living through this shoot, because we weren't sure for a while there.  And best of luck on your next film."
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telegonus
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June 11th, 2018, 6:08 pm #451

FritzFassbender wrote:

"Bela, we present you with this commemorative award for....well, for living through this shoot, because we weren't sure for a while there.  And best of luck on your next film."
It's so nice to see these three together and, apparently, pleased to be in one another's company. Pops is being a good sport and the Lonster looks clean and sober (emphasis on looks, not too shabby for the big guy circa 1956).
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Andy
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Andy
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June 11th, 2018, 9:22 pm #452

Dear Tele,

Interestingly, Poor Bela was 73 and a few months away from his date with the Grim Reaper.

Rathbone was 63, and looks pretty good given all those Fatimas he fired up.

Lon Chaney, Junior, only 50, appears to have many more miles on him than your usual five-decade dude.

Regards,

Andy.
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Joined: November 25th, 2017, 8:55 am

June 12th, 2018, 2:02 am #453

telegonus wrote: Lonster looks clean and sober (emphasis on looks, not too shabby for the big guy circa 1956).
Well, if by 'clean and sober' you mean not sloshed at the exact moment the picture was taken, I'll say....maybe.

This is about the time frame where Chaney Jr. transitioned from a somewhat more worn version of the leading man we knew (like the way he looked in say, Bride of the Gorilla) to the more haggard character-actor look that would serve him through the 1950's.
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Andy
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Andy
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June 12th, 2018, 2:24 am #454

Dear Fritz,

In Lon Chaney, Junior's Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man production stills, the guy looks great! Lean, fit, and youthful at age 36.

By the time our hero bowed out of his Inner Sanctum series, he looked bloated, puffy, and mottled. That would be around late 1945-46.

He appeared healthier in Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, but Lon Chaney, Junior was only 42 at that point.

We are sadly aware of our hero's appearance at publicity photo opportunities in the late 1950's and early 1960's.

Alcohol abuse, excesses with food and tobacco, and youth's flight all contributed to the late-in-life visage with which we became only too familiar.

By 1970, Lon Chaney, Junior had been diagnosed with throat cancer. Chemo therapy of that era did not contribute to the sufferer's appearance.

Think about the sad visage Lon Chaney, Junior recorded in 1971's Dracula Versus Frankenstein.

One would imagine that a working actor for thirty years, especially one as busy as our hero, would have been well-fixed financially. 

Unfortunately, Lon Chaney, Junior's impetus to keep working was to remain qualified for healthcare benefits that attended his employment.

By 1971, Lon Chaney, Junior would have qualified for Medicare, and, given his steady employment, would have benefitted from healthcare available to actors.

Respectfully,

Andy in Vancouver.
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telegonus
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June 12th, 2018, 6:18 am #455

Andy wrote: Dear Tele,

Interestingly, Poor Bela was 73 and a few months away from his date with the Grim Reaper.

Rathbone was 63, and looks pretty good given all those Fatimas he fired up.

Lon Chaney, Junior, only 50, appears to have many more miles on him than your usual five-decade dude.

Regards,

Andy.
 
Thanks, Andy. Bela looked good in A & C Meet Frankenstein. especially considering his age; well past sixty and all that.

Poor Lon 🙄 (oops!), He never looked really good to me. I mean, well. I suppose in his youth, well before forty, he might have had the potential to have become a rugged (very rugged) cowboy star, but there was always that air of melancholy to him.

Rathbone looked pretty good for a long while. Sadly, the "major" phase of his movie career pretty much ended circa 1946. It was never the same for him afterward. Yet he generally looked healthy, and young for his age. Check him out in Tales Of Terror (1962). He was around seventy at the time and didn't look worn out.

Dear Boris never seemed to have a true "lookin' good" period. He was middle aged by the time he became a star, and he seemed to age fast, on screen anyway, looking much older than his years in the Columbia horrors he appeared in around 1939-40. By the time he began working for Val Lewton and Isle Of The Dead came along his hair was (stupidly, in my opinion) made to look unnaturally curly, and it was also gray. In the next year's Bedlam he seemed somewhat younger and more vital.
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Wich2
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June 12th, 2018, 11:15 am #456

>TELE: - Rathbone looked pretty good for a long while. Sadly, the "major" phase of his movie career pretty much ended circa 1946. It was never the same for him afterward.<

I think something to that effect has been said here before. With respect, I rank it with the "Poor Orson" and "Poor Bela" stuff. All of these folks were successful, working artists for a long time. And I have a pet peeve about the idea that Features Are All That Matters. Post-46, Rathbone worked very much on Stage (including Broadway), on Network Radio, and in the coming medium, Television.

>TELE: Dear Boris never seemed to have a true "lookin' good" period. He was middle aged by the time he became a star, and he seemed to age fast, on screen anyway, looking much older than his years in the Columbia horrors he appeared in around 1939-40.<

I think much of that was intentional makeup and characterization, for those largely mad scientist roles. Here he is in '47:

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blufeld
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June 12th, 2018, 11:37 am #457

Lon Jr. looked pretty good in that appearance at the amusement park (probably early 60s?).
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HalLane
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June 12th, 2018, 6:03 pm #458

Boris wore heavy "straight" makeup for just about every role to cover his naturally dark complexion, making him look a bit unnatural onscreen. Offscreen photos show him looking much more vigorous and relaxed.

The Lonster's character lines unfortunately demonstrate the long-term deficits of alcohol, tobacco and firearms.
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telegonus
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June 12th, 2018, 7:18 pm #459

Wich2 wrote: >TELE: - Rathbone looked pretty good for a long while. Sadly, the "major" phase of his movie career pretty much ended circa 1946. It was never the same for him afterward.<

I think something to that effect has been said here before. With respect, I rank it with the "Poor Orson" and "Poor Bela" stuff. All of these folks were successful, working artists for a long time. And I have a pet peeve about the idea that Features Are All That Matters. Post-46, Rathbone worked very much on Stage (including Broadway), on Network Radio, and in the coming medium, Television.

>TELE: Dear Boris never seemed to have a true "lookin' good" period. He was middle aged by the time he became a star, and he seemed to age fast, on screen anyway, looking much older than his years in the Columbia horrors he appeared in around 1939-40.<

I think much of that was intentional makeup and characterization, for those largely mad scientist roles. Here he is in '47:

My use of the term major phrase was limited to film work, not overall success. Rathbone had agent issues in Hollywood that apparently limited what he could do in films, or that's what I've heard. As to his overall career, he was active and successful on stage and in other media.

Sometimes an actor being off-screen for long or longish periods does indicate personal problems, or professional ones, as the case may be, but not always.. Even the great Vincent Price was largely absent from the screen, in horror especially during his later years. After the Phibes pictures he seemed busier in other media, and doing well at it. He hosted the PBS mystery series for a long while. appeared on stage, wrote cookbooks, appeared on Johnny Carson, had a fair amount of visibility right to the end but his two to three pictures a year, usually horror but not always days were long gone.

That was his choice. It was also Karloff's choice to do other things than star in movies for most of the Fifties, not a busy movie decade for him. Lugosi and Chaney had genuine health issues and were getting on in years, which exacerbated what ailed them. Peter Lorre's general health was in decline in his last decade or more, and that kept him from appearing in major films. Sometimes actors have other interests than acting. Vincent Price had cooking and art, the others did their things as well. It wasn't my intention to suggest than it was win or lose where feature films were concerned, just a comment on what certain actors were up to.
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Wich2
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June 12th, 2018, 9:37 pm #460

Tele, my main point, is usages of the term "major"...

To me, Acting is Acting.

Stage, Radio, TV - it all counts.

- Craig
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