blufeld
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August 23rd, 2018, 12:54 pm #21

How does he handle "The Hound of the Baskervilles"?  My favorite Holmes story.  I've read the novel 15-20 times, and see most of the movies, but skipped Cooke and Moore.  I've even seen th Matt Frewer one.  Peter and Andre were the best of the movies.
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Wich2
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August 23rd, 2018, 1:57 pm #22

Glad you liked it, Rick.

I guess the highest kudos I can give it personally, is that I generally hate "The Game." Too cutesy-poo, by several magnitudes. 

But I like this book, which as you say rides on that wave, very, very much!

- Craig
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Rick
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August 23rd, 2018, 10:26 pm #23

blufeld wrote:How does he handle "The Hound of the Baskervilles"?  
There's nothing special to tell about his handling of HOUND. It's presented, as are most of the other stories, as an episode in the lives of Holmes and Watson. Passages from the book are quoted, often streamlined, and most of HOUND's story is told in shorthand, but Baring-Gould seems to always stop short of spoilers, just in case some non-Sherlockian is reading.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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ryanbrennan
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Joined: December 5th, 2004, 2:56 am

August 25th, 2018, 3:04 am #24

When I was listing the pastiches I have I thought the list seemed a little light.  I walked past a shelf and noticed three more:

SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE GOLDEN BIRD -- Frank Thomas
SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CASE OF SABINA HALL -- L.B. Greenwood
SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CASE OF THE RALEIGH LEGACY-- L.B. Greenwood

I haven't read these three.
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Rick
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August 25th, 2018, 3:48 am #25

Well now, whatcha got there, Ryan, is three titles I've never even heard of. 
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Wich2
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August 25th, 2018, 3:21 pm #26

ryanbrennan wrote: SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE GOLDEN BIRD -- Frank Thomas
God rest ol' Frankie Thomas, who I've had the mixed blessing of seeing In Full Rig ~

Frankie Thomas.JPG

~ but his several HOLMESes* annoy me. They're weak Rathbone and Bruce, filtered though an odd Camp-ish sensibility.

*(BRIDGE DETECTIVE, TREASURE TRAIN, MASQUERADE MURDERS, BIZARRE ALIBI, SACRED SWORD, cranked out during the mini-pastiche boom era ushered in by Nicholas Meyer.)
Last edited by Wich2 on August 25th, 2018, 3:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Wich2
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August 25th, 2018, 3:40 pm #27

On the bright side, I recall liking this collection ~




~ with early pastiches, including those by such Eminent Sherlockians as Fr. Ronald A. Knox, Vincent Starrett, and Adrian Conan Doyle.
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Joined: April 22nd, 2007, 10:37 pm

August 25th, 2018, 6:25 pm #28

early pastiches, including those by such Eminent Sherlockians as Fr. Ronald A. Knox, Vincent Starrett, and Adrian Conan Doyle.

That one is enjoyable

Russ
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Rick
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August 26th, 2018, 5:24 am #29

I started this thread because I had some Sherlock Holmes books on the shelf which I hadn't read and, since I was planning to thin out my stuff, I decided to read 'em and get rid of 'em. So far so good. But...being a hopeless case, I have counteracted my own intentions by acquiring three more books. Not gotten rid of, no, but acquiring more. Oh, well.

Here's what I've just bought, based on recommendations in the books I just read by Vincent Starrett and William S. Baring-Gould.

SHERLOCK HOLMES: FACT OR FICTION   by T.S. Blakeney
PROFILE BY GASLIGHT   edited by Edgar W. Smith
SPOTLIGHT ON A SIMPLE CASE    by Robert  S. Morgan

Oh, well...at least they're all supposed to be good reading.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Wich2
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August 27th, 2018, 12:13 am #30

A madness, Rick - but a FINE one!
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ryanbrennan
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August 27th, 2018, 6:04 am #31

I found two more lurking on my shelves.

SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE THISTLE OF SCOTLAND -- L.B. Greenwood
GOOD NIGHT, MR. HOLMES -- Carole Nelson Douglas.  This is one of the Irene Adler series I mentioned earlier.
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Wich2
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August 27th, 2018, 3:00 pm #32

Another on me own shelf -

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ryanbrennan
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August 29th, 2018, 1:12 am #33

Sherlock Holmes meets Tiny Tim, Craig?
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Wich2
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August 29th, 2018, 1:13 am #34

(Haven't read it! Though Tim would not be tiny by the 1890's!)
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ryanbrennan
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September 5th, 2018, 5:15 am #35

Found another one lurking on the shelves: THE HOLMES-DRACULA FILE by Fred Saberhagen.
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Rick
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September 5th, 2018, 10:23 pm #36

I used to have that one, never read it, and it's disappeared somewhere along the line.

I think there's a healthy handful of Holmes-Dracula books, as with the Ripper. Of course, Sherlock would have had his hands full in late-Victorian London, with Dracula, the Ripper, a certain Mr. Hyde, even Dorian Gray if he'd cared to look into it...it was a troubled time, obviously.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Rick
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September 12th, 2018, 1:29 am #37

Couple of very recent (as in--today!) and very brief reads.

SPOTLIGHT ON A SIMPLE CASE by Robert S. Morgan is a book. Of sorts. It's one essay, less than forty pages, but there it is between two solid hardback covers, all by its lonesome. Among the shorter "books" I've ever read.

I bought this because one of the previous books I'd read just raved about it. I can kind of understand why...and can kind of not. The thing is, basically, a deconstruction of A STUDY IN SCARLET, purporting to show what really happened and how Holmes sort of, errr, lied

There is an odd and unexpected diversion of several pages into the depths of 19th Century American Presidential politics. Interesting stuff and it -- sort of -- has a point in its inclusion. Sort of.

I will say that there is one notion -- almost certainly the source of all the praise I'd read -- which sort of makes the whole thing worthwhile. It's a bizarre, out-of-the-blue thing which caused me to unexpectedly laugh out loud. Actually I laughed a couple of times, but both were due to this one bizarre, silly, hilarious idea. I'll say no more.

The other thing I read is a short story titled "The Darkwater Hall Mystery" by Kingsley Amis. I found this story on my shelf when I removed some of the Holmes books from their ancient hiding place there a while back. I had cut the story --very very precisely trimmed -- from an issue of Playboy decades back. I used to do this sort of thing all the time, figuring I'd save a story or article for the future. Well, the future is now, I guess. 

I have numerous stories by Bradbury, Clarke, Asimov and some others which are still around here somewhere, still neatly trimmed from Playboy or Readers Digest or one of the s-f mags, still waiting for me to finally get to them.

Amis has given us here not really a Holmes story at all, but very much a Watson story. Sherlock is shipped off for some r&r right off and the case falls into the lap of the Good Doctor. 

Amis gets the style, the language, and the feel of Doyle quite well. But the story itself is bland and the mystery is nonexistent. It's all so incredibly straightforward and obvious that I was sure, right up to the last sentence that the author would spin some bizarre twist to make it all worthwhile, but...no. The mystery is not at all, and the villain is just as supposed from the get-go and there is nary a surprise to be seen. Very strange. Extremely so.

Amis was a noted writer and clearly he knows his Doyle, but there is just simply nothing here beyond a pleasant recreation of appropriate style. Very strange. Disconcertingly so.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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blufeld
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September 12th, 2018, 11:23 am #38

What about Amis' COLONEL SUN?  Did he catch Ian Fleming?
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Wich2
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September 12th, 2018, 12:57 pm #39

Not too terribly.

At least, better than the first Gardner BOND, "License Renewed," which I can barely recall.

(Didn't keep either, for what that's worth.)
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Wolfman Joe
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September 12th, 2018, 2:18 pm #40

I'm selling a small lot of Holmes pastiches & such, please take a look if you are interested in this sort of thing:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/173525277811
Special deals for CHFB members - send me a message!

"Quick! The auction is afoot!"
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