Artifacts of monster mania. Plus the CHFB Monster Kit Gallery!
Crow T Robot
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Joined: May 16th, 2007, 11:28 pm

January 18th, 2018, 1:46 am #21

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Wendigo
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Joined: September 15th, 2017, 3:25 pm

January 18th, 2018, 5:42 pm #22

We all seem to have looked at ( and often ordered from) the same ads. It's amazing I somehow missed the flying saucer one. I was frequently tempted by the submarine, but never quite got to the point of sending for it.

Unless one was able to order two copies and save one in-opened, I expect most of these eventually fell apart and landed in the dumps somewhere. Anybody have any idea how pricey surviving posters or submarines are?
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MadScientist
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Joined: January 31st, 2015, 6:59 pm

January 21st, 2018, 5:30 pm #23

Wendigo wrote: We all seem to have looked at ( and often ordered from) the same ads. It's amazing I somehow missed the flying saucer one. I was frequently tempted by the submarine, but never quite got to the point of sending for it.

Unless one was able to order two copies and save one in-opened, I expect most of these eventually fell apart and landed in the dumps somewhere. Anybody have any idea how pricey surviving posters or submarines are?
The Flying Saucer was never in a comic or kid magazine as far as I can remember. I have never seen this item advertised anywhere and seems to be fairly rare. I am fairly certain it was some sort of RCA promotion.  My mum worked for RCA in the 60s and that's where it came from.  I will have to go through my old things and post a photo of the album cover for it had a photo of the assembles saucer with kids shown for size.  I haven't found a photo of this on the Internet.  Ebay has the loos 45s for sale.  The record has the RCA Victor label and it Number PRM 252-2  UNKM-5008 (disk 1) and Number PRM 252-2  UNKM-5010.

I will dig out my album during this years spring cleaning and (hopefully find it ) and post an image.
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SAM33
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Joined: December 18th, 2005, 3:28 am

January 21st, 2018, 6:10 pm #24

The framed Frankenstein and Dracula posters make very cool collectibles today Kookster!
Lucky you, thanks for sharing...

SAM33
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tv horror
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Joined: August 25th, 2006, 6:58 am

January 23rd, 2018, 8:32 pm #25

I always wanted these toys especially the Submarine, while I live in the U.K these seemed impossible to own but hey a kid can dream. However I still have the wall posters of Karloff Lugosi Chaney still in their mailing tubes from the Captain company. Those giant posters look great framed maybe one day if I can find a wall! 
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Wendigo
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Joined: September 15th, 2017, 3:25 pm

January 24th, 2018, 5:03 pm #26

My own room looked a good deal like Mark's in the '79 SALEM'S LOT which perhaps is another reason I'm fond of that TV-film. I even had some of the model-kits as in his room. It's odd I didn't order more of the posters and "submarines" and like from the comics, I must admit.
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tv horror
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Joined: August 25th, 2006, 6:58 am

January 24th, 2018, 9:42 pm #27

It's funny you should mention the comic adverts, I used to scratch my head at those adverts asking you to sell Grit? What the heck was Grit, I always thought it was soil or as it is called in the U.S dirt. I always picked out the telescope binoculars or the rocket and as a sideline the multi-tool compass, happy days. 
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Joined: November 10th, 2004, 5:32 am

January 26th, 2018, 12:33 am #28





I LOVED reading GRIT when I was a kid!  They printed the best comic strips!

- GJS
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

January 26th, 2018, 2:21 am #29

It was actually a decent (if you were okay with the rural/conservative lean) little general-interest paper. With, as Gary says, decent funnies - and even some fiction.
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

January 26th, 2018, 2:31 am #30

I never knew anyone to read GRIT, and, actually, don't believe I ever saw a copy of it. I was always confused about the ads asking kids to sell GRIT. Far as I knew the newspaper -- if it existed at all -- must have been read by so few people that I couldn't understand how anybody could make any profit from it, and I halfway thought those ads were some sort of scam on the children of America.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

January 26th, 2018, 3:10 am #31

Nope.

In fact, it was still doing well in the '90s, when the ad placement company I dayjobbed at had it as a a client! In a weird way, it was a proto-version of USA TODAY.
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

January 26th, 2018, 3:18 am #32

Must not have made much of a dent in the Jeffersonville, Indiana market. I honestly believe the only times I ever heard of it were in those comic ads.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

January 26th, 2018, 3:20 am #33

Oh, it wasn't big. But I saw it back in the day.

And it WAS "national."
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tv horror
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Joined: August 25th, 2006, 6:58 am

January 26th, 2018, 3:03 pm #34

Thank you for the information on Grit that's another of life's mysteries solved, a newspaper!
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kneeteartap
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Joined: May 1st, 2009, 4:17 am

May 17th, 2018, 4:41 am #35

The newsletter that came with the Moon Monster stated that Boris Karloff was Russian.

So much for journalistic integrity.
Kneeteartap
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tv horror
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May 30th, 2018, 11:02 pm #36

Technology he did take the name from a Russian family member the Boris came later as it sounded Russian. 
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

May 30th, 2018, 11:42 pm #37

Wellllll.....Boris's story was that "Karloff" was a family name, but no researcher has ever found the name in Mr. Pratt's family tree. So who knows?
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
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DonM435
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Joined: April 8th, 2005, 11:16 am

May 31st, 2018, 12:37 am #38

Note:

http://www.erbzine.com/mag7/0764.html

In December 1918, All-Story Weekly published a serial H.R.H. the Rider, by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The story features one Prince Boris of Karlova.

There's no evidence that Pratt borrowed the character's name, nor any that Burroughs borrowed the actor's name. Probably a coincidence, with both coming up with a name that sounded just right.


 
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Rick
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 2:22 pm

May 31st, 2018, 12:51 am #39

Also, the villain of DRUMS OF JEOPARDY was named Boris Karlov, but William Henry Pratt became Boris Karloff by 1912 at the latest and that predates both JEOPARDY and THE RIDER. And since Karloff was a nobody when those were written, it's doubtful that the lifting went the other way.

Stephen Jacobs discusses the name question in his book BORIS KARLOFF: MORE THAN A MONSTER. He says that at least one of Karloff's brothers discounted the Russian family name idea.

And Jacobs quotes someone's research which turned up a 1904 novel titled THE MAN ON THE BOX which featured a villain named Count Karloff. A stage version of that novel played Canada in 1909, and Pratt was in Canada at just about that time, so that seems a pretty good possibility.
“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be.”
~ Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
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Joined: November 10th, 2004, 5:32 am

June 1st, 2018, 10:53 am #40



And how do we account for Warner Oland's character's name in DRUMS OF JEOPARDY - Dr. Boris Karlov?


Also, the villain of DRUMS OF JEOPARDY was named Boris Karlov, but William Henry Pratt became Boris Karloff by 1912 at the latest and that predates both JEOPARDY and THE RIDER. And since Karloff was a nobody when those were written, it's doubtful that the lifting went the other way.

Stephen Jacobs discusses the name question in his book BORIS KARLOFF: MORE THAN A MONSTER. He says that at least one of Karloff's brothers discounted the Russian family name idea.

And Jacobs quotes someone's research which turned up a 1904 novel titled THE MAN ON THE BOX which featured a villain named Count Karloff. A stage version of that novel played Canada in 1909, and Pratt was in Canada at just about that time, so that seems a pretty good possibility.
Oh...  beat me to it.


- GJS
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