OKJA

Dick
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Dick
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Joined: 4:12 PM - Dec 24, 2012

4:24 PM - Mar 29, 2018 #1

This is director Joon-ho (THE HOST, SNOWPIERCER) Bong's latest film, rather unfortunately financed by Netflix, which shows zero interest in releasing it on Blu-ray. It's available for streaming, of course, but those of us who like to have physical copies are being told what I was when I called the company: "Netflix has no plans at this time." This also goes for the superb MUDBOUND, which was nominated for an Oscar, and a bunch of other films they have produced. I protest, and will keep calling them and writing to them. I'd love a little support!

Phone support #: 866-579-7172
Address: Netflix Corporate Headquarters 100 Winchester Circle Los Gatos, CA 95032

Many thanks, fans!
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Joe Stemme
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Joined: 6:38 PM - Jul 16, 2013

9:39 PM - Apr 08, 2018 #2

Topic currently exists in CURRENT FILMS section: okja-2017-directed-by-joon-ho-bong-char ... 67153.html

I do echo your comments on Netflix in the review:

Nobody is ever going to confuse Bong Joon-Ho with an Alfred Hitchcock or a Sidney Lumet - direct, precise filmmakers. Joon-Ho's films veer wildly in tone. OKJA is no different than SNOWPIERCER, MOTHER, THE HOST etc. in that regard. But, no matter the apparent looseness of his filmmaking style, Joon-Ho's movies work on a deeper emotional level. And, so does his current work.
It's a Girl and her Pig tale meets Whistleblowing on evil corporate scientists - Charlotte's Web meets The Insider. Don't let the idyllic early scenes of the Mija and Okja the pig in South Korea fool you - this movie gets pretty dark before it's over (Parental warning: the movie is unrated, but it would be an R). Tilda Swinton has a dual role as twin sisters who run the evil food-processing corporation Mirando which has developed Super Pigs like Okja. The Mirando scenes are played very broadly which can be off-putting at first compared to the more naturalistic farm scenes. There's also a militant animal rights group (the ALF) lead by Paul Dano - and, those scenes often play as wacko as the Mirando ones.
All three story strands come together when Okja and Mija come to NYC and New Jersey for a Super-Pig convention, that, naturally, will be crashed by the ALF. As I noted earlier, the movie gets pretty grisly and dark towards the climax, but a strand of black satire and a touch of humanity makes it bearable - and brings the theme into focus.
OKJA (and Joon-Ho's work overall) is not for everybody. His methods border on the undisciplined, but, for me, they burrow into the subconscious like few other movie-makers working right now.

It's a damn shame that Netflix is dumping OKJA into only a handful of theaters. The $50M production with plentiful CGI deserves to be seen on the big screen. But, like the Mirando corporation, Netflix has their own corporate agenda.
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dracsback
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Joined: 9:52 PM - Dec 13, 2008

2:17 AM - Apr 19, 2018 #3

Why should Netflix release their movies on physical media?  Subscribe and be captive.
"I saw what I saw when I saw it!"
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Dick
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Dick
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Joined: 4:12 PM - Dec 24, 2012

2:26 AM - Apr 19, 2018 #4

dracsback wrote: Why should Netflix release their movies on physical media?  Subscribe and be captive.
Nope. I won't play that game, and they won't play mine (I want physical discs), so we're at a impasse for the time being.
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Dr Kelp
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Joined: 2:34 AM - Nov 27, 2016

8:37 PM - Jun 28, 2018 #5

I enjoyed Okja, although I think it was a bit too long at over 2 hours. This could have been a PG13 movie if they toned down the swearing and some of the violence and it would have played to a larger audience. Anyway , CGI was well done and the storyline unique, but would the public really allow the slaughter of an animal that was obviously the smartest animal on the planet next to humans, capable of communicating with humans more-so that even apes? I guess if they were starving they would.
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