Frankenstein (1931)

The monstrous studio that sparked a century of monsters.
telegonus
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Joined: July 27th, 2006, 12:07 pm

April 16th, 2018, 6:27 pm #1281

blufeld wrote:
telegonus wrote:
rvoyttbots wrote:

VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA & a many roles on TV including RAWHIDE, ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS, CASINO ROYALE, etc.
Points well taken; and yet there was something about Peter Lorre himself, the mere sight of him, that by the Fifties had become almost a parody of him as a type. A rare case of an actor becoming his own Frank Gorshin maybe. In his prime Lorre was a great serious actor. He could bring dark humor to his characterizations, yet for all that he was a true Master.

I remember, as a child, seeing Lorre in revivals of some of his fairly recent films at weekend matinees,--films like Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea and 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea--and the kids in the audience, hip to films like few people are today, and aware of who Peter Lorre was, got some laughs from him in  certain scenes. Some scenes were maybe intentionally borderline funny; and there were those memories of seeing Lorre in Jerry Lewis movies and the like. Also, some of the old Warner Brothers cartoons that feature "Lorre figures", with Mel Blanc doing a spot on imitation of Lorre.

Another way to put it would be that in his later years Peter Lorre seemed to be carrying some baggage, funny baggage. Not always, and in many films not even most of the time, but it was there all the same. One can see hints of things to come from much earlier in Lorre's career. There are those moments of what I can best describe as "desultory hilarity" in the younger, slimmer Lorre. In his performance as Joel Cairo in The Maltese Falcon, for instance.

Serious or funny, menacing or playful, Peter Lorre was one of the greatest character actors of all time; and as he was also, now and again, a star player, he was one of the great stars as well. I hesitate to call him a true horror star, and yet I suppose that wouldn't be a million miles from the truth, either. He had that aura. An uncanny quality.
Who was Peter Lorre supposed to be on the ROUTE 66, the Penguin?  Boris was F, Lon was WM, Lorre had no monster he was identified with.
Years ago the issue of who or what Lorre represented on the Lizard's Leg And Owlet's Wing episode of Roue 66 was discussed somewhere,--I think it was on this board--on the Web anyway, and I believe someone made the suggestion that he was in effect filling in for Bela Lugosi, and it seems that way to me having watched the show a couple of times since. Lorre is dressed a bit like Lugosi in vampire mode, and I believe that Karloff even makes a reference to the "swirling London fog" or some such to suggest something of a vampire or Jack the Ripper screen image that Lorre presumably had. I guess he was just the spooky guy, while the others in that episode had  clearly defined personas. It was a "nostalgia episode" anyway, clearly referencing the Shock Theater films that had been sold to local TV stations some years earlier, and it probably resonated more strongly with Boomer/Monster kids than adults who grew up on going to those movies in the theater. Vincent Price was absent from the guest star lineup, and like Lorre he had no "monster identification", although he was developing a horror star one with the Roger Corman horrors he was making around the same time. But Price didn't have a classic era horror image, and he was a few years younger than the others. I can't see him fitting into that one anyway, as his stardom was still current and not primarily based on older films.
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thehorrorboy
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Joined: November 23rd, 2005, 5:12 am

April 16th, 2018, 9:16 pm #1282

TomWeaver999 wrote: Great color shot of Karloff as the Monster in FRANKENSTEIN "from the photograph experts with 35 years of experience":

https://www.ebay.com/itm/FRANKENSTEIN-B ... SwFLBaZ1Dm
That photo was taken after Frankenstein performed the OTHER operation on the Monster.  You know, the one the censors wouldn't allow to be shown on screen!
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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

April 16th, 2018, 10:24 pm #1283

Ah, yes - Victor was working in Sweden then, I believe...
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Andy
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Andy
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Joined: August 21st, 2008, 1:43 am

April 16th, 2018, 11:09 pm #1284

Dear Wich,


...At the Jorgenson Clinic, right?

Andy.
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blufeld
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Joined: March 21st, 2017, 4:34 pm

April 17th, 2018, 11:50 am #1285

I can't keep up, that's Elsa Lanchester as THE MUMMY, right?   And the name is Frankenstein.  Henry Frankenstein.  Not Victor.  Right?
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crissrudd4554
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Joined: June 16th, 2012, 1:34 am

May 2nd, 2018, 12:34 am #1286

blackbiped wrote: Here's another new one:

I had done a similar video to this about two years ago.

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blackbiped
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Joined: April 25th, 2004, 12:58 pm

May 2nd, 2018, 1:03 am #1287

Cool!
Legend, oh legend, the third wheel legend...always in the way.

Porfle's Secret Blog: http://porfle.blogspot.com/
HK and Cult Film News: http://hkfilmnews.blogspot.com/
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blackbiped
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Joined: April 25th, 2004, 12:58 pm

June 23rd, 2018, 4:06 am #1288

New video:

Legend, oh legend, the third wheel legend...always in the way.

Porfle's Secret Blog: http://porfle.blogspot.com/
HK and Cult Film News: http://hkfilmnews.blogspot.com/
My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/porfle
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crissrudd4554
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Joined: June 16th, 2012, 1:34 am

June 23rd, 2018, 2:55 pm #1289

Cool video. I too can’t help but think of the titles to those future films when that scene comes up. Too bad Baron didn’t get around to toasting the ‘Bride of Frankenstein’! ;)
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Andy
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Andy
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Joined: August 21st, 2008, 1:43 am

June 23rd, 2018, 3:40 pm #1290

Dear criss,

By then, the Baron, himself, was toast!

Andy.
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telegonus
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Joined: July 27th, 2006, 12:07 pm

June 23rd, 2018, 6:48 pm #1291

blackbiped wrote: New video:

Thanks for posting, Blackbiped. Prescient video. 😱 Old Baron Frederick Kerr could really sell a scene. Karloff's monster in the 1931 film is by far the most frightening looking of them all, from Universal anyway. Later monsters were maybe bigger, more padded, but his face, just the look of him, could give you nightmares. 😨
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crissrudd4554
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Joined: June 16th, 2012, 1:34 am

June 25th, 2018, 2:52 pm #1292

Interesting Tweet. Director Guillermo Del Toro wants Frankenstein restored to its CUT form! I guess he’s unaware some places did show the film in the uncut form in its original release.

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blackbiped
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Joined: April 25th, 2004, 12:58 pm

July 12th, 2018, 2:09 pm #1293

New video:

Legend, oh legend, the third wheel legend...always in the way.

Porfle's Secret Blog: http://porfle.blogspot.com/
HK and Cult Film News: http://hkfilmnews.blogspot.com/
My Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/porfle
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marbpl2
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Joined: May 8th, 2008, 5:52 pm

July 13th, 2018, 6:35 pm #1294

Actually, it seems like the A & C Monster's mark was raised a few inches (at least in still portraits).

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Wich2
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Joined: September 12th, 2007, 10:09 pm

July 13th, 2018, 6:50 pm #1295

Marb, I think that's largely the angle and the lighting?
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telegonus
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Joined: July 27th, 2006, 12:07 pm

July 13th, 2018, 8:36 pm #1296

crissrudd4554 wrote: Interesting Tweet. Director Guillermo Del Toro wants Frankenstein restored to its CUT form! I guess he’s unaware some places did show the film in the uncut form in its original release.

https://twitter.com/realgdt/status/1011 ... 81536?s=21

I can understand that. The restored version does contain Henry's "I know what it feels like to be God!" line (I paraphrase), which is all for the good, however the little Maria death scene doesn't work for me. It doesn't seem to seriously add to or "enhance" the movie, but that's me. It wouldn't bother me one way or the other if they took it out.
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mrbluesky
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Joined: June 22nd, 2012, 5:11 pm

July 14th, 2018, 9:11 pm #1297

The scene with the child is perhaps the most indicative of the tragic nature of the Monster.

When he throws little Maria into the water it is an act (as Craig has pointed out in the other thread) of a child at play.

He immediately sees that something is wrong. She doesn't float like the flowers. He thrashes the water frantically. 

Terrified, he flees wiping his hands, horrified at what he has done. 

By this point we should know what he is. 

Here, we see who he is.
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