Alfred Lai
Alfred Lai

3:13 PM - Feb 15, 2013 #11

Good Lord Graeme!

This thread started a decade + ago! There was a war, countless bought and un-built kits, and a different trade for me in between!

I am still interested in this subject. It shows how robust our interests are.

The two black and white pictures are very interesting. I came across the RCD ones in various other sources. Have you noticed in the B/W pictures?

- The 30 Cal was on a tripod mount and tied down by a rope on the turret!

- each Sherman had a manpack radio while they have their own antenna. I guess that must be for range control safety net before the motorola days.

- The cap badge worn by the loader was the Armoured Fist; presumably he wasn't trade qualified. The crew commander's cap badge was barely visiable but very fade. I blew up the picture but still could not make it out. The shape is round-ish and is more like the Ontario Regiment then the Horse Guards.

- The crew command had a piece of camo material with him and again on his shoulder in the second picture. What was that and what pattern was that? CF issue or his own gucci kit?

- In the second picture judging by those classic "life firing range" poses I presume there were life ammo on board and yet the crew commander had a cigarette in his mouth! This picture is a perfect reference for those whose is good with figures for a diorama, sadly I am not.......

Thanks for pictures! Meaford looks as misersable as ever.

By the way, this is my first post here for over five years! Nice to be back.


Alfred




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Jason Bobrowich
Jason Bobrowich

3:45 PM - Feb 15, 2013 #12

Hey Alfred,

Good to have you back!

I think those Shermans with the painted on stars might have been used for OPFOR for the Centurions.

That is probably why the GPMG on the tripod is lashed to the turret and the Commander is wearing what looks to be an old U.S. style HBT camouflage (Herringbone Twill camouflage) jacket.....seen holding it on the turret ring in the first pic and wearing it standing up in the turret in the second pic with the ciggy butt hanging off his lip.

I don't think the second image is live firing...the driver identifiable in the first pic is standing on the back deck with the binos and the co-driver from the first pic is standing next to him on the back deck....and the driver's hatch is open which would not occur during live firing.

To me they are acting as OPFOR and simply in a hull down position waiting for the Centurions.
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Alfred Lai
Alfred Lai

4:34 PM - Feb 15, 2013 #13

Hi Jason,

Thanks, nice to be back. I haven't built anything in the last few years (but keep buying though) and have nothing to contribute but keep reading the posts. Wouldn't miss it for anything; people here are so knowlegable! Learned so much about the CF.

Yes, you are right. Come to think of it, it couldn't be on a fiting range. There shouldn't be vegitation on the pad and there were no colour flags etc.

Interesting to think about that time period circa 1967. While our Shermans were training vehicles by then other Shermans were still on front line service. The Israeli and the Eygptians both had them in their war the same year. A couple of years earlier in 1965 the Indians and the Pakistani had Shermans fighting each others' Pattens and Centurions.


Alfred
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Joined: 1:33 AM - Aug 25, 2004

6:02 PM - Feb 15, 2013 #14

Hey Alfred,

Good to have you back!

I think those Shermans with the painted on stars might have been used for OPFOR for the Centurions.

That is probably why the GPMG on the tripod is lashed to the turret and the Commander is wearing what looks to be an old U.S. style HBT camouflage (Herringbone Twill camouflage) jacket.....seen holding it on the turret ring in the first pic and wearing it standing up in the turret in the second pic with the ciggy butt hanging off his lip.

I don't think the second image is live firing...the driver identifiable in the first pic is standing on the back deck with the binos and the co-driver from the first pic is standing next to him on the back deck....and the driver's hatch is open which would not occur during live firing.

To me they are acting as OPFOR and simply in a hull down position waiting for the Centurions.
the NDIl captions the last one as being 1954 in Korea, as Cdn returning US tanks. But the serial #'s on the tanks, they look very Canadian - at least - they look the same as the colour picture above which is labelled Borden.

Would Canadians paint their own serial #'s on loaned tanks?

GD
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Jason Bobrowich
Jason Bobrowich

9:52 PM - Feb 15, 2013 #15

The RCD Squadron did have the last tour in Korea but those are Canadian M4A2E8s in the image and I would bet the caption is wrong as the image would have been taken in Canada.
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Rod Henderson
Rod Henderson

3:55 AM - Feb 16, 2013 #16

Al, found this thread while I was looking for the same thing (thankfully JP has this fourm set up so replies will bring a thread to the top, unlike ML where the same questions get asked over and over because once a thread drops of page 1, it ceases to be a discussion point...but that's a rant for another day).

I have managed to find scant pics of Shermans, and none of post-war Stuarts. I woudl be really interested in seeing post war Stuarts.

These are captioned as being Meaford c1967. Turret looks to have a 8-pointed star on it. Maybe Ontario Regiment? They had Shermans until 1972 (!), QYRANG turned in their tanks for jeeps in 1965 when they became Armd Recce. Centurions are probably RCD.




"Sherman Tank at Petawawa" Going to say RCD based on location.


Possibly the same exercise (image tags are sequential).


The above markings are very similar to those RCD Shermans as they appeared on return to US-loaned tanks in Korea in 1954:
78-976 was an RCAC School tank, not directly issued to the Ont Rs, as far as I know. Those could be Ont Rs crewing the tank though. By 1967 they were one of the few regiments to have Sherman-trained personnel. Alternatively, they may be crew from the RCAC School. Would that explain the RCAC cap badge or did they wear their own regiment's badge?

I'm going to agree with Jason that the lineup of tanks in B&W is not from Korea. I've seen that photo labelled as Korea before but it doesn't make sense. The Korean tanks did not have those type of numbers. Those are the exact numbers that were being used in Canada.

The second-last shot, 78-874, must have been taking prior to 1960. That tank was turned into an APC, along with 22 others that year.

Photos of post-war Stuarts seem to be rare. Clive Law found some of the them at LAC. The shots are the Stuarts and Shermans being delivered to Longe Pointe in November, 1946.

Here is one in the Windsor Star:http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Px ... uart&hl=en




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Joined: 3:48 AM - Apr 08, 2011

1:32 PM - Feb 16, 2013 #17

I am looking for some details on the marking carried by Shermans (M4A2 76mm HVSS (W)) and Stuarts in the post war period.

I am particularly interested in those vehicles served in the Land Forces Central Area (i.e. Ontario ).

Thanks in advance.

Alfred
I have some access to our historical archives.
There are some pics of the 8th NB Hussars/8th Canadian Hussars using shermans after WW2.
Need help on how to post the pic here, can someone point out the thread on how to post pics, can't find it.

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Joined: 1:33 AM - Aug 25, 2004

3:51 PM - Feb 16, 2013 #18

78-976 was an RCAC School tank, not directly issued to the Ont Rs, as far as I know. Those could be Ont Rs crewing the tank though. By 1967 they were one of the few regiments to have Sherman-trained personnel. Alternatively, they may be crew from the RCAC School. Would that explain the RCAC cap badge or did they wear their own regiment's badge?

I'm going to agree with Jason that the lineup of tanks in B&W is not from Korea. I've seen that photo labelled as Korea before but it doesn't make sense. The Korean tanks did not have those type of numbers. Those are the exact numbers that were being used in Canada.

The second-last shot, 78-874, must have been taking prior to 1960. That tank was turned into an APC, along with 22 others that year.

Photos of post-war Stuarts seem to be rare. Clive Law found some of the them at LAC. The shots are the Stuarts and Shermans being delivered to Longe Pointe in November, 1946.

Here is one in the Windsor Star:http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Px ... uart&hl=en



Thanks for info Rod.

GD
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Jason Bobrowich
Jason Bobrowich

5:48 PM - Feb 16, 2013 #19

I have some access to our historical archives.
There are some pics of the 8th NB Hussars/8th Canadian Hussars using shermans after WW2.
Need help on how to post the pic here, can someone point out the thread on how to post pics, can't find it.
Don,

For sure those images would be of interest to see. You can use a photobucket account to host the images. If you need assistance just email me.
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Alfred Lai
Alfred Lai

7:36 PM - Feb 16, 2013 #20

I have some access to our historical archives.
There are some pics of the 8th NB Hussars/8th Canadian Hussars using shermans after WW2.
Need help on how to post the pic here, can someone point out the thread on how to post pics, can't find it.
Thanks, I look forward to it. If I remember correct your Regt had Grizzlys too.
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