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Pete the steam
Honorary Life Member
Joined: January 30th, 2010, 9:00 pm

July 15th, 2018, 3:50 pm #11

tiger1john wrote: Peregrine falcons?! Not common. Must be great to watch them pick off the odd meal. Can just see it too right of your photo. I think you need to spend more time in that pub Pete do you can catch done clearer photos...
There are making a come back round here John now that the industrial ares are returning to nature.
My real name is FRIDAY. When I was born me Dad looked at me and said to me Mam..........
'We'd better call it a day'
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Spot99
Hero Steamer
Joined: March 29th, 2017, 9:34 pm

July 15th, 2018, 6:26 pm #12

They are very partial to chicken, especially Old Speckled Hens.
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Pete the steam
Honorary Life Member
Joined: January 30th, 2010, 9:00 pm

July 15th, 2018, 6:30 pm #13

Spot99 wrote: They are very partial to chicken, especially Old Speckled Hens.
Flamin' hell, I must be a Peregrine😜
My real name is FRIDAY. When I was born me Dad looked at me and said to me Mam..........
'We'd better call it a day'
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MrDuck
Steam God!
Joined: March 5th, 2010, 5:48 am

July 15th, 2018, 8:42 pm #14

A great experience. Shy birds.
Et in Arcadia Ego
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txlabman
Steam Legend!!
Joined: May 24th, 2017, 2:25 pm

July 15th, 2018, 9:26 pm #15

The Peregrine Falcon and Falconry

This bird is native to North America and Europe and has traditionally been one of the most prized and common birds for falconry. It is highly effective and easily motivated to work with its handler. It is known for its trademark stoop and excels at waiting on. Typical quarry caught with the Peregrine are large birds including grouse, pheasant, ducks, huns, pigeons, doves, and ptarmigan. 

This bird is known for it's stooping strikes at quarry. It will ring, or circle, up high above potential prey, thousands of feet up, then fold its wings and drop out of the sky. The attack style is to overtake and attack directly. The strike is aimed at the head of the prey and will kill the target instantly. These birds have been clocked at speeds upwards of 230 mph, and it is thought that they can dive faster than that. 
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