Remember to include your contact information for unregistered guests. Feel free to "bump" your ad if it "falls off" the screen. Before you buy or sell, check out the Horse Buyers Checklist and the Horse Sellers Checklist

Other Places to Advertise Your Horse; Photo Tips & How to Add Pics to Your Ad

msequine
School Master
School Master
Joined: May 15th, 2005, 5:16 pm

August 31st, 2007, 12:08 pm #1

First eMail the photo you want to post to the following address:

MSEQ_photo.36572@uploads.photobucket.com

You should receive an eMail confirmation message if you successfully sent your picture. The message will contain a link to your photo. Click on it, and it will take you to your uploaded photo.

As you're viewing your photo, look on the right side. You will see a box with the IMG code. Copy the code in this box, paste it in your post, and the photo will display in your post!



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msequine
School Master
School Master
Joined: May 15th, 2005, 5:16 pm

September 18th, 2007, 1:14 pm #2

I think most of us tend to look at ads with pictures more so than those without. It has been said that horse ads with pictures or videos tend to sell faster than those with words only. However, some photos actually hurt more than help. With that in mind, I’ve scoured the web and compiled a few tips on how to photograph your “Horse for Sale.” Although the last two tips seem to be converse, if you click the links and read the articles, you’ll notice that both are trying to avoid the same potential pitfall.
wrote:“Ads with photos get far more "hits"/attention and therefore those horses usually sell quicker. Most people don't like to consider checking out or buying a horse they haven't even seen a photo of yet, so use the full potential of those sites to reap the greatest number of reachouts coming your way …” http://www.naturalhorsetraining.com/TrainingTips72.html
wrote:“You might have a very nice horse, but the wrong picture can turn sellers off.  … As an amateur photographer, you should take at least a full roll of film per horse (or as many digital pictures as it takes!), to ensure that you get at least six that are good.” http://www.equineobsession.com/launch.htm
wrote:“Photos and videos give the buyer instant gratification, something that you want them to have!
If you can, post more than one photo. Post photos with an up close head view, a side view, rear view, and a picture of the horse moving, or being ridden. If you are only allowed to post one photo, make sure it is a good quality, professional if you have one, photo showcasing what the horse does best.”  http://www.horseresource.org/BuySell-Horse.php
wrote:“… any old picture of your horse won't do the trick. You need to consider what impression you want the buyer to get and then choose an appropriate picture, which is clear and sharp.”  http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/best/art ... ?aid=33693
wrote:“Pick an uncluttered background. A natural background such as a field, woodland, or pasture is a good choice. The barnyard or driveway, no matter how neat and clean, is not a great choice because of the stuff that is bound to be in the background. You want the viewer to be wowed by your horse, not your new Cadillac Escalade. Look at the details before you click! Sounds crazy, but how many amateur photographs have you seen that depict horses with pitchforks growing out of their heads? As improbable as it sounds, I bet at least one, right? It bears repeating—check the background!”  http://www.amazines.com/article_detail. ... eid=223256
wrote:“Because horses are so large, it is necessary to get back at least 15 or 20 feet to prevent distortion, and a camera with a telephoto lens is a great help. Otherwise, keep your distance, and enlarge the prints if necessary. If you get too close, and say it's a head-on shot, the horses nose and face will be huge, and the rest of the body will appear quite small.”  http://www.horsesonly.com/finder/phototips.htm
wrote:Take photographs of light-colored horses against darker backgrounds and of dark horses against lighter backgrounds so their coat color doesn’t blend into objects behind them.”  http://www.painthorsejournal.com/archiv ... tMar05.pdf
wrote:“Photos should be clear, cropped and have sharp contrast between your horse and the background.  Photograph your horse at his best.  If you are selling him as a show jumper, download your best jump shot.”  http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-exclu ... nline.aspx
wrote:“Choose a bright, but not necessarily sunny, day. Strong sunlight creates dark shadows that aren't particularly helpful, especially on a dark horse. If you are taking your picture on a sunny day, use a flash to eliminate some of the shadows.”  http://www.newrider.com/Library/Misc_Ti ... horse.html
wrote:“Submit high quality pictures that show your horse's best attributes:
*Show a rider on the horse if trained to a discipline.
*Scan more than one picture together to create an image for your ad: head shot, side view, rear view, riding or moving.”  http://www.todayshorse.com/Articles/Tip ... elling.htm
wrote: “When setting a horse up for a profile (side view) picture, do not set their feet together. The front leg closest to you should be slightly in front of the far front leg. The rear leg closer to you should be behind the far rear leg.
The horse in a front ¾ view photograph should have its feet offset just a little. This gives the animal an appearance of being square. A ¾ rear view is taken the same way, except the horses’ head should be turned toward the camera so the eye can be seen.”  http://www.myhorseforsale.com/horsesens ... tid=6&id=6
wrote: “Trying to photograph a horse milling about in a pasture does not produce good results. Instead, halter the horse and have a helper hold it during the photo session. 

Don't photograph a horse from the 3/4 fore view... that is, don't photograph a horse with its shoulder closest to the camera... it is almost always unflattering even to very nice conformation horses. It tends to distort proportions the opposite way you want to. You will create a photo that makes the shoulder & head look larger (coarser) and reduces the size of the handsome hindquarters. Also don't stand above a horse - get down where the camera height is about level with the horse's mid body.  Whenever you take a 3/4 view photograph, position yourself where the camera is closer to a hind leg than a front leg. This way, any potential distortion will be flattering to the horse's conformation rather than unflattering. The hip will not appear shrunken in size, and the head and neck will be shown well, but not enlarged.  http://www.curlyhorseweb.com/horsepics.html


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msequine
School Master
School Master
Joined: May 15th, 2005, 5:16 pm

March 22nd, 2008, 4:11 pm #3

If you don't see your favorite Horse Ad Site listed here, please feel free to eMail me with a link and I'll add it to the list!

Ag Direct

Eq-Western.com

Equine.com

Dream Horse

Equine Hits

Horse Clicks

Horsetopia

Horse Web

Horse Marketer

Horseville

Horse Ads

MidSouth Horses Forum

Web Pony

Bits & Bridles

eHorse

PHJ Forum (QH & Paint)


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