What is the difference between?

The Dioramas discussion group is hosted by Marijn Van Gils and is dedicated to all aspects of military model dioramas.

What is the difference between?

Ian MacAulay
Ian MacAulay

November 13th, 2001, 5:48 pm #1

Hi guys,

What is the difference between Celluclay and polyfilla (stucco) Is there a difference, because the powder sure looks the same in the bag. Also what is the difference between these two and plaster of Paris?

Thanks,
Ian MacAulay
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

P.S. I thought I posted this yesterday but don't see it anywhere, so if this is a double posting I apologize!
Quote
Share

Jordan Baker
Jordan Baker

November 13th, 2001, 8:35 pm #2

Hi Ian.

There is a big difference between Celluclay and Polyfilla. The Celluclay is a form of pre-mixed paper mache. The pollyfilla is a form of plaster. The difference is that Celluclay takes longer to dry and can be resculpted somwhat after it has dried by adding water. Once pollyfilla sets it is set. I personally enjoy Celluclay better as I find that I can add scenery over the course of a few days. It also had a slightly matted earth texture to it. The down side to is that it can take days or even weeks to fully dry and it can warp as it dries. To avoid this put in lots of white glue and score the base. Plaster of paris is similar to polyfilla but holds better detail.

The plasters are good for casting building walls and such.

Hope this helps.
Jordan Baker
Quote
Share

Bob Collignon
Bob Collignon

November 16th, 2001, 6:08 pm #3

Celluclay is a fantastic medium if done right.
I always add white glue and I usually precolour the mix using cheap craft store acrylic paints in an appropriate colour. I apply with various sized and home made spatulas. My "slurry" is the consistancy of lumpy pudding or thin and lumpy mashed potatoes.
About 60-70% Cellu-20% water-20ish% paint and glue.
I've been using Celluclay for about 20 yrs now and have never had it warp or crack.
I speed dry the mix eitherr in the oven or really speed dry it in the micro wave, if there is no metal present.
Make sure your wooden base is well primed if you speed dry and don't super rush it so things melt or actually start to burn. Yes I have speed dried in the oven with plastic figs. and vehicles in the oven,BUT on very low heat and constant checking.
Using a microwave and thin layers of Celluclay I can have a base ready to start painting in about 20-40 minutes. My 2c Bob ps I hate plaster for bases it's way to fragile and "Chippy"
cjltd@ no spam adelphia.net
Quote
Share

Tim Lehmann
Tim Lehmann

November 17th, 2001, 12:49 pm #4

Hi guys,

What is the difference between Celluclay and polyfilla (stucco) Is there a difference, because the powder sure looks the same in the bag. Also what is the difference between these two and plaster of Paris?

Thanks,
Ian MacAulay
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

P.S. I thought I posted this yesterday but don't see it anywhere, so if this is a double posting I apologize!
How about combining the best traits of the two materials? Polly filla (or plaster of Paris, for that matter) sets rock hard real quick, so you could use that to make a rough base, with the basic shape of the dio.,then use the celluclay in successive thin layers to fine tune the shapes, etc.
That way you get the texture and other good qualities of the celluclay without the drying difficulties.For all those times when nuking the stuff isn't practical!
One thing about plaster though, if you make biggish dioramas, they can get heavy...the last big one I made (500mm x 470mm)almost gave me a hernia getting it in/out of the car!
Colouring the celluclay is a great idea, and a must...like an idiot I didn't, on that same dio.,and every time I look at it I have to get out the brush and raw umber paint to zap yet another pin-prick of gleaming white peeping out from under a brick.
Also, if you use MDF (craftwood or whatever else it's known by) for your base, you must seal it with an oil based undercoat or someting like that to stop it soaking up water, because not only dose it warp when it gets wet, it bulges.
Quote
Share

Jordan Baker
Jordan Baker

November 18th, 2001, 12:16 am #5



Quote
Share

Bob Collignon
Bob Collignon

November 19th, 2001, 9:14 pm #6

Shaping foam to size and shape is A LOT easier than using Plaster of Paris for a bottom base shaping coat and A lot lighter My 2c Bob
Quote
Share