Weathering question

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Weathering question

Joined: January 24th, 2006, 4:49 pm

February 11th, 2007, 11:10 am #1

Forgive me if this sounds a little basic but could one of you gents clarify the following for me?

Once the basic colour has been applied what would be the suggested sequence for the filters, pin washes chips etc ?


Would a gloss coat after the intial colour application prior to any further applications be advised?

Thanks in advance.


Andy
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

February 11th, 2007, 5:36 pm #2

You would apply your base coat first, then any airbrush shading like a faded dusting over the base shade.

Filters next to adjust the overall look of the base coat.

After that add smaller dark washes or pin washes to pick out details

Do a little dry brushing with light or dark colors if desired

Add any chips, scratches, etc.

Personally I dont use any gloss coat, and see absolutely no need for one. I paint with Tamiya acrylics, Gunze acrylics, Testors and Humbrol enamels, and some other paints now and then. When dry, I use Weber's Turpenoid and artists oils for my filters, washes, etc. They don't soften or hurt the dry paint at all. I have found gloss coats can change the color of the base coat (usually make it darker) and also sometimes washes tend to bead up on them.
DAVID NICKELS
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Joined: January 24th, 2006, 4:49 pm

February 12th, 2007, 10:43 am #3

Thanks for the help, much appreciated.
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Joined: August 12th, 2004, 3:14 pm

February 12th, 2007, 2:05 pm #4

Theres not one hard/fast way of doing weathering. I think some things like chipping and rust should always come pretty much last, but there is no reason you cant go back and repeat some of the steps at different points to increase an effect, change a color, tone something down, brighten it up, etc.
DAVID NICKELS
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