Wash disaster

Hosted by Dave Parker from AFV Modeller magazine and Adam Wilder, this discussion group is geared towards modelling technique questions ranging from construction to final weathering. This forum was created so that "newbies" can post without being intimidated by the sometimes highly technical nature of the other discussion groups.

Wash disaster

Brian Finlayson
Brian Finlayson

September 2nd, 2003, 2:28 pm #1

Help, my washes look great when I apply them, but when they dry, they look horrible. I am using oils and terpenoid thinner over acrylics. The problem is that the thinner evaporates, and paint that had been in the crevices and corners has dried in splotches.
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Dave O'Hara
Dave O'Hara

September 2nd, 2003, 9:23 pm #2

wiping the excess pigment and thinner away, using a soft rag (lint-free, of course) or a tissue. Still another way to reduce the unwanted residue would be to gently brush the offending pigment and thinner with a brush dipped in thinner, using a light scrubbing motion. Subsequent drybrushing should further enhance the look of your washed model. HTH, Dave
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stephen brezinski
stephen brezinski

September 4th, 2003, 2:39 pm #3

Help, my washes look great when I apply them, but when they dry, they look horrible. I am using oils and terpenoid thinner over acrylics. The problem is that the thinner evaporates, and paint that had been in the crevices and corners has dried in splotches.
applying the wash over a gloss or flat finish? A coat of acrylic floor wax allows a wash to flow more evenly and is less prone to be splotchy when dry. The wash does not soak into the paint.

Try a pin, or point wash. This involves using a fine brush and applying the wash only around the crevices and shadow areas you wish to darken. Not applied over the entire model.

What I like is a technique Adam Wilder showed me. Paint a base coat of your color. Apply the wash. Then apply a lighter shade of the base coat to blend & feather the wash in. This also can be used to lighten the upper surfaces to simulate sun fading. This does require a good airbrush and technique.

G'luck

Stephen
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Joined: September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am

September 11th, 2003, 10:08 am #4

Help, my washes look great when I apply them, but when they dry, they look horrible. I am using oils and terpenoid thinner over acrylics. The problem is that the thinner evaporates, and paint that had been in the crevices and corners has dried in splotches.
I have found that the oil paint must be well mixed with the turpentine and using a broad soft brush, cover the whole model as quickly as possible. Touch up the uneven areas and then allow model to dry under a lamp. The quicker the drying, the more even the finish. This technique also reduces the gloss "tide" marks that are sometimes left behind.

Always follow up with a dry brush 24 hours later to create a more even tone. Concentrated washes can now be done around recesses etc.

A messy wash, especially the brown pigments are great at simulating dirt especially on armoured vehicles. Most often many completed models look too clean to simulate something that has been outdoors for several years.
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john memoli
john memoli

September 12th, 2003, 8:39 pm #5

Rember after combat the crews didn't just hang out. They spent considerable time mainting the vechicle. Ask any former crew member. The amount of dirt built up would not be years worth ,since a tank in that condition would likely breakdown. The tank would be washed even in combat and paint would be retouched or reapplied. John
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