Turps wash... now that wasn't supposed to happen.

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Turps wash... now that wasn't supposed to happen.

Phil Fisher
Phil Fisher

February 29th, 2004, 2:29 am #1

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
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Ken Neil
Ken Neil

February 29th, 2004, 5:40 am #2

Acrylics are generally sealed with a gloss coat such as Future floor wax, washed, and then sprayed with a matting agent such as Testors Dullcoat. Practise on an old model first.
Turpenoid is available in art supply stores although I have seen it here (North America) in some department stores such as Wal-Mart that have well supplied craft sections. Hope this helps.
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Bob Johnston
Bob Johnston

February 29th, 2004, 9:09 am #3

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
Try using White Spirits its not as strong as turps Iam in aus so u should be able to get it .
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Stuke Sowle
Stuke Sowle

February 29th, 2004, 3:07 pm #4

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
...that you find some turpenoid. I got mine at a local art supply store, but if you are having trouble at a local store, there is plenty to be found on the internet.

I use Tamiya acrylics with no clear coat, and it has not attacked the paint. I have also used white spirits, but the turpenoid seems to give me better results.

Stuke
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Phil Fisher
Phil Fisher

March 1st, 2004, 1:54 am #5

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
I've been trying to fix the damage done to my poor model and I noticed it's only on the top where the turps sat and was allowed to dry. I think if I'd dabbed the excess off it might have worked better. D'you think?
I tried asking for white spirits at a hardware and the guy just gave me turps and said it was white spirits. Is the stuff actually labelled "white spirits" or is it a kind of generic term?

Many thanks for all your help.
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Stuke Sowle
Stuke Sowle

March 1st, 2004, 2:48 am #6

.."white spirits". I was at Home Depot today, and they had tons of it in the thinner section. Cheap too.

I'd be wary of anything that says thinner or turpentine.

Stuke
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Jim Hayes
Jim Hayes

March 2nd, 2004, 1:32 am #7

I've been trying to fix the damage done to my poor model and I noticed it's only on the top where the turps sat and was allowed to dry. I think if I'd dabbed the excess off it might have worked better. D'you think?
I tried asking for white spirits at a hardware and the guy just gave me turps and said it was white spirits. Is the stuff actually labelled "white spirits" or is it a kind of generic term?

Many thanks for all your help.
I think you are quite correct in assuming that the spots you are trying to deal with are from "puddling" caused by an excess of the wash medium.
If I may, I would like to make the following suggestions:
Try using Gum Spirits of Turpentine for your wash thinner when doing an oil based wash. Although a bit more expensive this product is readily available, of a much higher quality than other thinners, and also flows more readily.
Testor's oil based figure painting colors, such as their raw and burnt umbers and siennas and their standard flat black work very well when thinned with gum spirits.
A flat acrylic sealer (I use Polly S or Model Master) seems to help alleviate the "attacking" problem.
Most importantly, learn to allow for adequate drying times bewteen coats, which easily vary for all of us.
HTH, Jim
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Phil Fisher
Phil Fisher

March 2nd, 2004, 3:42 am #8

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
.
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Alan Caylor
Alan Caylor

March 3rd, 2004, 3:05 pm #9

...that you find some turpenoid. I got mine at a local art supply store, but if you are having trouble at a local store, there is plenty to be found on the internet.

I use Tamiya acrylics with no clear coat, and it has not attacked the paint. I have also used white spirits, but the turpenoid seems to give me better results.

Stuke
...highly agree on the turpenoid, I love this stuff. I use it with oil paint as a wash over enamels. WORD OF CAUTION..do not use "Turpenoid Natural", don't know what this stuff is but it has a drying time of about 200 years, use plain Turpenoid, dries fast.
Alan
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neilson
neilson

March 10th, 2004, 8:58 pm #10

I don't use washes, but I just experimented with a mineral turps and oil paint wash on a tank I'd painted with Tamiya acrylic and left to dry for several days. The turps attacked the paint here and there and I had to repaint it. I've read articles where people say they painted their model the same way but only left it a few hours before applying the turps wash with no ill effects. So what gives? Is it possible mineral turps are different strengths around the world (I'm in New Zealand)?
I also tried with Humbrol thinners and that worked ok so I might experiment more with that and see how I go.
I also tried asking at my local hardware store about turpenoid and they guy just giggled and said he didn't have any, which was even more annoying than the usual blank stare and the "duuuuuhhh... what?"
use this mixture of turpenoid and artist oil paints in the tube. it works perfect and will not affect the paint at all.
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